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Cut that pipe out in 2 places. One place is above the bottom shelf of the new cabinet and mid way between the 2 fittings on the upper pipe that goes at a 45 degree angle. Recouple it back together when the cabinet is installed. The supply lines need to be relocated too, but you may be able to move them around to get past their issues. The cutting of the ...


2

I would probably just cut out section of subfloor around this mess, and the section of drywall, and then re-route everything (under the subfloor) so the pipes come out of the wall. It's not that difficult, and it's probably less work than modifying cabinets and doing the creative plumbing necessary to get this to work. Of course, this might also mean ...


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Standard bathroom vanities were made at 32" years ago when many homes typically were 2/1's with a shared bathroom. That means parents and children would be using the same vanity. To accomodate children, vanities were lowered to 32" which is standard height. Now that many homes have multiple bathrooms and even a dedicated bathroom for each room in the ...


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The makers of those tops will have the seam adhesive to join the tops permanently. If they are anything like Corian by Dupont, they want to protect their warranty. You may need to do some convincing to an installer to sell you the adhesive you need. It can be done, I have done it before. It takes a router or a belt sander to get the joint down flush after ...


1

If you're looking for something like this (only hopefully fancier). You could simply build the cabinet in such a way, that there is a brace where the pedestal part should connect. Just make sure the brace is strong enough to support the sink, and has a way to connect the sink to it while also allowing the plumbing to pass through. NOTE: These ...


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This is not a trivial project, as apron front sinks have straight edges on the front sides and bottom. 2 cleats should span under the sink to support the weight. They should be sturdy enough to make the cradle, perhaps 1x3 or 1x4, oriented like joists. You could reinforce the cabinet sides with the same size boards laid flat and extending to the cabinet ...


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I don't think this is a design matter. It is a matter of the flooring. You tile or whatever and it extends close to the wall - well doesn't matter a lot because vanity it over it. So there makes doing that side of floor easy instead of cutting the tile to fit exactly at vanity. And then that is the next point, what do you do if you get a new vanity? If ...


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Most standard type box vanities are constructed with a back stile across the width of the unit at the top/back. We never connect them to the floor. We find the studs in the wall and screw the back stile to it. When doing this, you can correct the level both side to side and front to back. Strategic use of shims helps in the leveling process, but the screws ...


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If you don't care about the existing granite, a hammer strike near a corner should split the slab and make it easy to wiggle a large flat blade screwdriver to "separate and lift". To minimize munging the cabinet, place a smallish piece of broken granite beside the next victim and use the former as a fulcrum.


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You'll have to get it started somewhere, but a thin wire wrapped on a handle at each end (as for cutting cheese) will normally cut things off if glued with something reasonable (ie, silicone or similar.) If they epoxied it in place, it's going to be much more difficult. Heat would be my first approach in that case, hoping the stuff softens, or turns out to ...


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I presume the sink is faux marble. Try Lime Away. Or C.L.R. - they should remove it without hurting the surface. Comet bathroom cleaner (The squirt kind) works good on light rust spots, but would take a while on really severe spots.



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