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You should contact your local government, as codes and laws vary from place to place. The Uniform Plumbing Code, says that there should be valves for every fixture in the unit. Uniform Plumbing Code 2012 Chapter 6 Water Supply and Distribution Section 606 Valves 606.3 In multidwelling units, one or more shutoff valves shall be provided in ...


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For the most part valves have issues with either the seal or collecting gunk near the closing mechanism. The older ones - 60s-mid 80s - seem to have a pretty high failure rate with their seals. I have not run into any specific issues with 90s built homes. But the fact is if one of your valves is having a problem then all/most will. If it is the same ...


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I think the answer to your question is "all of the above". Yes some valves are made better than others. Some types (ball versus globe valve) are better than others. The installation process might have affected them as could how frequently they are used. Certain elements in your water might also be a factor. If you don't want to solder a lot or call a ...


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There are a lot of buildings that have this situation where people may be condo or townhouse owners. The normal thing to do in your situation would be to upgrade your shut-off valve. Maybe even install another one right before/after your first opening on the mainline.


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The first thing you should do it check your static (no flow) water pressure and the pressure with water flowing. Find a place where you can attach a pressure gauge and check the pressure with and without flow. You need to find out if this is truly a pressure issue or if the issue is related to restricted flow. Check the static and flow pressure both ...



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