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8

Water meter calibration is something your water company can do for you, or you can hire an independent company to do it. I saw one water company charge $70 for calibration. When water meters lose accuracy with age it is usually in your favor: large-scale calibration efforts have been profitable for water companies because replacing inaccurate meters usually ...


7

The small black box may be the exterior electronic reader end of your water meter. Trace the wire into the house and if it connects to your water meter then you probably can't do much about that box. You may be able to have it relocated by your water utility. The center grey box appears to be for phone lines and the one on the right looks like cable TV. ...


7

Here's what I'd do to verify your meter is working correctly. First, shut off the water to your house where it enters and note the reading on the meter. Give it a couple hours and check the meter again - it should be the exact reading it was before. If it is not, there is a leak between the meter and your shutoff. Next, turn your houses main supply back ...


6

You can't get rid of the telephone box in the middle. The FIOS connection provides telephone access to the FIOS panel and then the lines running from the FIOS panel to the telephone panel are used to connect all of the phones in your home to the FIOS telephone connection. As for what you can do to make the situation better, I might plant a small tree, maybe ...


5

Since all the telephone companies were deregulated, the practice is to have a demarcation point (which I'm really surprised no one else has mentioned yet). Most homes built within the last 20 years or so will have one, which will be a box or jack (often marked "DEMARC") marking the change in responsibility between their network and your in-house wiring. ...


5

There are several things you can do: Pictures, with clear reference points (eg, natural features of the land such as rock cuts, streams, as well as man-made structures). Drawings using graph paper, and with GPS marking locations For non-metallic water pipes (anything without a metal wire in it), bury a metal wire alongside (really, any kind of continuous ...


4

I would at least take some pictures. Make sure to get some landmarks that will likely be around for a while, so someone else can orient the pictures, if needed. Another possibility is to get GPS readings of the locations of the tracks. If you have, or know someone who has, an Android phone, the My Tracks app will record a GPS track, upload it to Google ...


3

Like Chris says, you'll likely have to pay for this. If the line had become damaged through no fault of your own, they would pay to run a new line, and at that point you might get them to run it a different way. That said, cable lines tend to be buried fairly shallow. You can dig it up yourself and rebury it a short distance away. Just be careful when ...


3

I would want a good separation between the electrical, water, gas, and any other conduits. I doubt you'd be able to push a water line through the conduits anyway unless they are using plastic pipe for the main, and even then it would be a challenge. In terms of what you may need in the future, here we have electrical, water/sewer, gas, phone (copper and ...


2

I have tunneled under a concrete pad using lengths of rigid pipe, a hose, and lots of dedication. You dig a substantial hole on both sides, then you put the hose in the pipes with a pressure nozzle, then you hammer the pipes through the ground and put them together as you need length.


2

If you could map it out on graph paper, that would be a good start. Try to be as accurate as you can - you want to think about trying to read and use this later. What this map will do is tell you where you need to "Hand-dig" if you are digging up the area in the future. There also might be an organization that is setup the local utility companies that ...


2

Not much you can do other than make it easy on the technician to access all of your phone jacks, POTS runs, and where it enters the house. In my experience, however, the problem is likely on their end. If you want to test it yourself, find the line closest to the point it comes in to your house (the point just after it leaves the Century Link Box) and ...


2

I ditched it in to the proper depth and had them lay conduit (thin polyethylene plastic pipe) for future maintenance ease. Since the cable tech had so little to do, they charged me for time and materials which was basically dropping the conduit in the bottom of the ditch with enough left over on each, snaking the cable, putting ends on and connecting them. I ...


2

Ccf stands for 100 cubic feet. So the meter is read 8953 hundred and 9035 hundred, or 895,300 cf and 903,500 cf respectively. More Info: When reading a meter, you'll notice each dial has an arrow. This arrow points the direction the needle spins. The number above the dial indicates how much the value increases, per revolution of that needle. For example. ...


1

Your second set of readings is correct. The meter face clearly states that for the left most dial, the scale is 1,000,000 cf per revolution. Thus each digit on that dial represents 100,000 cf. Each dial to the right is 1/10 of that to it's left. So each digit for the 4 dials, from left to right, indicates 100,000; 10,000; 1000; and 100 cf, respectively. ...


1

Well not to get into DSL troubleshooting but might as well throw this out first: When getting DSL service you may need to have filters on all phone jacks - even those not used. However you may or may not (you shouldn't) need a filter on the jack supplying your modem a feed. If you have a dual jack for your modem then I would try first unplugging phone ...



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