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Your current plywood is suitable for hardwood installation. I do not ever like to use 1/4 subfloor as it is brittle and when screwed sometimes doesn't lay flat. If I added to your subfloor I would at least put in 1/2 inch but like I said you don't need it with 16" OC. Note that a thicker sub might have benefits but at the same time you are adding weight ...


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I would glue and screw down the plywood. If you use hardy backer board I would use a dash patch or leveling compound on that before you set your tile. A good alternative would be to do a mud job on top of the plywood that would take care of the leveling problem. A mud job is tar paper stapled to the plywood with a layer of stainless steel mesh nailed to ...


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I don't know why you would've been advised to glue or lock a floating floor down. This a very bad idea & could make the floor cup or ridge if the floor can't move. Parquet is very different in being extremely small pieces with extremely small omnidirectional movement in a whole lot of very small areas. Having no underlayment is the typical way & ...


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Nothing. You want the wood to breathe & there are plenty of 100+ year old houses to prove & approve this "method". If you're gluing & face nailing the boards, then forget the nails. Screw down the subfloor & then Finish Screw down the finish floor. You'll never have a squeak & the floor will always be solid.


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In agreement with the above and further suggest: 1) Walk the existing floor in silence, use 1-1/4" screws to eliminate real or perceived squeaks. 2) Pay attention to the butt joints, if they are swelled knock them down with a belt sander. 3) At the top of the stairs be sure the entire area is screwed down well, it takes brutal traffic. 4) Go opposite the ...


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I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but particle board is not a good choice of subfloor, unless it has gotten better over the years. (It has, at least in Australia, see edit below)I asked the question of floor suppliers and here on SE about fastening flooring to particle board with an answer that said nobody will guarantee the floor will stay in place. ...


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The goal is a smooth, flat surface for the vinyl to lay on. If you can do that with 1/4, then that is great. But in your case it sounds like you need to step up to 3/8 or 1/2 depending on the gap. Once you put that down, then there is no need to add 1/4 plywood.


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For sound insulation, there are multiple layers where you can tackle the issue, and the more you do, the better the result: Insulation between the joist bays. No vapor barrier needed since this is for sound, not thermal. This is going to eliminate the high pitched sounds like voices, more than the low thumping of walking that will transmit directly through ...


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You could use Cork as a deadening agent or finished product, use it as a deadening agent and it would prevent any off gas issues. As Iggy said, you would want to insulate the joist bay's, however I don't think you want to pack them tight. If you pack a bay tight with insulation the sound waves use it as a vehicle and transmit each wave easier, a loose pack ...


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Insulate the new subfloor in the joists below to thwart any condensation issues first, as much R-value as you can get in there. Other than that no, the "underlayment approved laminate" can just sit on the underlayment & you might be able to double or triple the planned underlayment, depending on the laminate manufacturer. However, Carpet on top of ...



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