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The first issue you need to address is why is the base eroding in the same place time after time? The large majority of above ground pools survive many years with a leveled sand base. The probable reasons for your erosion problem is an unstable base, misguided water runoff or the base is a bit too high in relationship to the surrounding area allowing runoff ...


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Answering my own question here with an email response from a Green Glue associate. In response to me basically asking him the exact same thing as in my original question: This application will certainly work. We would recommend using the heaviest & thickest material that you can...1/4 plywood is going to be a bit too light & thin. If height is ...


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The reason the floor materials aren't as effective is because this problem is best solved with an air-gap and a flexible connection spanning that air-gap. But you have a hard time supporting a floor with that air-gap. Therefore, solving this problem via the ceiling below this floor is better, using resilient or sound attenuation channel there. That said, on ...


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Per request, I'll expand my comment into an answer: as for the joints in the concrete, I'd use polymeric sand (typically used for locking pavers). Then the key is to create some sort of smooth pad in between the concrete and the bottom of the pool. Some options: roofing felt (tar paper). Ice and Shield roofing membrane rubber pond liner epoxy (if it's ...


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There are several good foam type underlayments available. For maximum sound proofing, I'd probably recommend one of the high density closed cell foam pads as opposed to the standard blue or white 1/8" lightweight styles. You may have to visit a flooring specialty store, I have never seen the better grades in stock at the box stores, although they may be ...


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A flexible underlay will compact when walked on. This helps if your floor is slightly imperfect (it is) and people walk on the tongue-and-groove connections (they will). The extra stress could cause the connector to snap off one of the boards. A more compelling reason is that any slight dips in the floor will cause an audible sound every time you step on it ...


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We installed an 18' diameter pool on top of a concrete pad using the 2' x 2' interlocking square foam pieces between the pool and the concrete. It feels great underfoot and the pool has been going strong for 4 years now.


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There is no reason to glue down engineered hardwood floor to an underlayment. This is just for initial aesthetics. The glue will NEVER last (in a residential setting). The only thing the glue will do is give you fits and make your install seem tighter. Within weeks or months the glue will come loose and you will have a floating floor. Nothing wrong with ...


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Per the Armstrong subfloors and underlayment manual, all Armstrong vinyl tile installations require an underlayment. If you don't have an approved underlayment, you may not receive full warranty coverage for the tiles. Further, the underlayment is secured using mechanical fasteners through the old tiles to the subfloor, so you don't have to worry about ...


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As mentioned in the comments of my answer most quality underlayment (minus cork) now comes with one taped side. To install the manufacturers recommend laying out the taped side in the same direction much like you will lay out the wood on your floors - for example if you have to make cuts on a row stagger them. Let's imagine a small room. It is 12 feet ...


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You have the answer in your question. I've used felt cushions in appartments to reduce traffic noise and it makes a huge difference. But beware, if you have a very uneven subfloor you'll get a lot of squeaky noises and no rosin paper or cushions are going to fix the problem.


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You probably missed "the best option for reducing noise to below" if you put down new subfloors and didn't put insulation under them (assuming you actually removed the old subfloor and had open joists.) Your next-best option would be to blow in insulation from below. If you are already committed to nail-down flooring, I don't think the underlayment will ...


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Done. Turns out that there's no glue under the underlayment, instead it's just luaun plywood sheets that are stapled extremely well to the subfloor. Once I was able to grab an edge, it was relatively easy to pry the entire thing off, one sheet at a time.


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On its website it says 8-10 hours. However it is not for the application you used it for. It is for gluing wood to things. Not for gluing foam/felt/whatever to concrete. Your underlayment has basically formed a bubble underneath. The wood glue needs a lot of air to dry - hence wood glue there will usually be a lot of air available. Now that the outside ...


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In this case it is highly unlikely that the actual brand of glue matters. Use your generic brand glue. Honestly I'm surprised it's a glue down floor at all. Usually the laminate floors are floating - at least in my experience...


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You could use some foam underlayment like used for laminate flooring. It is about 3/16 inch thick, cheap and you can use typar or packing tape to hold the seams. The same train of thought, how about blue vinyl siding insulation. It is 1/4 " thick, 4 ft wide and folds out to about 16 feet. Also pretty cheap.


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You can staple it down - not as messy and fairly quick. I've used something like this on a remodel. It was 3/8" cork over plywood subfloor, then bamboo on top.


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You don't have to glue it but it needs to be secured somehow - duct tape. Don't want the pieces rolling up on each other over time. You would just be duct taping the underlayment to the outside flooring or in the inside seams. And duct tape isn't hillbillying your floor. It is used because how well it handles moisture. Maybe someone has a specific ...


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We usually staple down the flooring paper just enough to keep it from shifting, then flatten the staples with a hammer or the back of the stapler. We overlap the rows by about 4 inches and tape the seams with Tyvec tape.


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I would probably attempt to just patch the one area and srape the rest off. Touch up with a grinder. However, that depends on how intact the existing CBU remains after scraping off the tiles and thinset. I would take the path of least resistance. If you try one way and it is taking way longer than the other way, switch.


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The underlayment for laminate is a vapor barrior, it is not to reduce noise. Check the product recomendations of your laminate to see what type of vappor barrior you will need on a slab floor.


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I don't know what Green Glue is other than it appears to form a gasket of sorts. My thoughts would be to try insulation along with layering some dis-similar materials to avoid conductive transfer. I'd suggest a sandwich of XPS foam, topped with cork underlayment, then your finish floor (which, ideally, could be dry-core subfloor panels topped with ...



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