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8

Yes, you should have a grounding block wired to a ground rod before the antenna wire enters your home. It won't necessarily prevent all damage from a direct lightning strike, but it will help. NEC in the States (NFPA 70) says that if you don't ground the grounding box to the same ground rod that is connected to your breaker box, you need a #6 wire between ...


7

The exact path lightning takes is going to generally be the one of least resistance, so if I follow your logic, you're thinking that by grounding it, you're lowering the resistance and thus increasing the likely-hood of a lightning strike. I think the reality is, if lightning is going to hit your house, it is going to hit your house. By grounding your ...


5

Yes- it the number of rods sticking out of the main antenna. 16 on one side 16 on the other side. These rods help remove ghosting, provide a clearer overall signal. They all have their own purpose and lengths are very precise and specific. These should not be bent, extended, shortened or connected to anything else in any way will cause poor signal. ...


4

It sounds like your antenna is for terrestrial broadcast TV, in which case it should be OK. You want it to be facing the transmitter as squarely as possible, but a little bit of variance won't affect the signal reception too much. If you have digital TV broadcasts in your area, you may not even notice anything at all. Furthermore, if you do find that it's ...


4

Yes, satellite dishes are frequently powered by DC current over the coax connection. The DC power comes from a "line power inserter" which will attach somewhere to the coax before it reaches the TV's. It may be a single connection or a splitter as well, but either design will connect to an outlet. Edit: As others have mentioned in the comments below, the ...


4

Grounding the antenna will actually help prevent lightning from striking it. During a Thunderstorm, anything conductive that is not grounded, will collect a static charge... as the charge builds up, it'll attract lightning to it. So grounding the antenna, drains off any charge that might build up attracting a strike. Also an ungrounded antenna, that builds ...


4

First things first, there is no such thing as a digital antenna, RF does not care whether the underlying modulation is digital pulse, FM, AM, SSB, Chirp or Spread Spectrum. Second, if you live any distance away from the transmission antenna, the more aluminum overcast you have, the more signal strength you receive. Whether it's inside or outside, size does ...


3

The amplifier appears to have Belling-Lee connectors (Wikipedia) while the cables look like they have "F" connectors (Wikipedia). Assuming you are in Europe, you should be able to find adapters. If you are in the USA, BL adapters are hard to find but I've gotten them from Radio Shack in the past. Also called PAL or European to F Adapter


3

There's no such thing as a Digital Antenna, the radio wave being intercepted by the antenna doesn't care what it looks like, only that its electrical specs capture the signal. Those fancy cut weird antennas that are made to look digital are just a sales ploy to increase the selling price. You probably need a new antenna with clean connections to the active ...


3

Well, if you are going to split it 3-ways, buy a 3-way splitter not a 4-way. I agree with the comment from Mikes about buying a more expensive model if possible. I would avoid a booster at all costs - power boosters add noise to the line - so yes you get a higher signal, but its noisier. As far as minimizing signal loss, here are the top items to keep in ...


3

There are many factors that affect signal strength, some are in your control like antenna placement, but most are not (other buildings/structures, topography, location of broadcast, atmospheric conditions, etc.). If you are trying to find the "best" placement then you need to do a site survey. The crude version of this is using a long temporary cable, ...


2

The answer depends on the strength of the signal. A weak signal, particularly digital, can have problems if the antenna sways in a way that changes its direction. If the signal is already adequate and the antenna only swings horizontally without turning, you should be fine.


2

In antenna design, 'elements' refers to the parts which convert the radiated signal to an electrical signal, so in this case it means the number of metal bars. They are arranged at distances which will increase the amplitude of the wavelengths you want, and generally more elements gives you a greater signal strength (up to a point)


2

Question 1: The FCC has a website that shows digital TV coverage using Google maps: http://transition.fcc.gov/mb/engineering/maps/ They also have a site that shows PDF maps by broadcast area, although I find them hard to understand: http://transition.fcc.gov/dtv/markets/ Question 1b: You want to scan "Digital STD" Question 2: Yes, you need an antenna. ...


2

Over the air (OTA) broadcasts are all digital now, so you will likely want to scan using the Digital tuner option, probably starting with "STD". You likely will need an antenna. antennaweb.org can help you select the proper type of antenna to get the most channels and provide some information on how it should be aimed. I believe that most antennas will ...


2

An old modulator (which is NTSC) will not be able to modulate a high-definition signal (which would need to be ATSC). The best you'd get would be a modulated SD signal. Rather than a modulator, I recommend an HDMI splitter, and long HDMI cables. I bought mine from monoprice.com, I highly recommend their products. My current configuration is a DISH receiver ...


2

A splitter takes RF power from an input and divides it up between multiple outputs. The splitters are designed to operate at a certain range of frequencies. For cable TV, this might be from 5 MHz to 900 MHz. The important thing to note here is the lower bound, 5 MHz. This splitter would block signals that are below 5 MHz. DC, or Direct Current, is low ...


2

This means that the splitter will allow DC power to pass through from the receiver to the source. This is typically required for satelite TV where the polarity is used to switch the LNB (Low Noise Block) between different bands (if I recall correctly, usually even/odd stations require reversing the polarity).


2

My strategy with satellite dishes was to get the dish aimed close to the final alignment, and then hand tighten the bolts. After this, I used light taps to change the alignment. Once aligned, tighten the bolts the rest of the way. Because the bolts are already snug, I never had problems with the dish moving further.


2

I've cleaned up after lightning hits an antenna, and designed spark gaps to protect electronics. The last thing I'd do is install a lightning rod through my basement. That stuff should stay outside, irrespective of NEC 810.21(J). Ground loops are not a serious concern in this particular application. I'd also consider changing the 8' rod into two 4' rods, ...


2

The antenna should be fine, the frequencies are still the same, it is the format of the information being transmitted that has changed. If that antenna is to be attached to a TV that hasn't been used for 10 years, odds are good that the TV will require a digital to analog converter box.


2

Grounding the mast is a very good idea if it is metal. You can get ground clamps that are designed for use with water pipes and conduit of practically any diameter. They are two curved pieces of metal that have machine screws on either side to clamp to the pipe. There is also a screw terminal for your ground wire. I would put a separate ground rod in, but ...


2

At the shed Grounding Electrode The first thing you'll need to do, is to install an approved grounding electrode at the shed. For this answer, I'll assume a 5/8" x 8' grounding rod will be installed. Bond the Mast You'll have to bond the mast of the antenna to the newly installed grounding rod, which you'll do using a 10 AWG copper conductor. You'll ...


1

SWM splitters aren't really splitters, they're active (powered) switches. The power is applied to the cable on the input side. Here's a page on how they work: http://www.spectrumspot.com/solutions/swm-kit.html No harm to try, but I doubt it will work for you. Passive splitters are fine if the runs from the splitter to the TV are short, and they're ...


1

You should search out "channel modulators" this should help you achieve cctv on whatever channel you have available.


1

Most satellite dishes have something called an LNB at the focal point of the dish which is powered. Power for the LNB is from the satellite receiver which is either from a set-top box or built into the TV. It's unclear why you're getting a shock off the dish itself, you shouldn't. It sounds like there is another power injector as indicated in BMitche's ...


1

I agree with points 1 & 3 of Fiasco Labs' answer. Before replacing the antenna, I would try the following. 1) Mark the current position of the antenna, and find the signal strength display on your TV set (or digital adaptor box) and note the reading and channel you take the reading from. 2) Try orienting the antenna similar to others that are nearby. ...


1

Antennae are just metal structures of some form. Short of rust, they don't really wear out. They may be tailored for particular frequencies, however. With digital TV, the signal isn't as strong as it was with analog, so it helps to have a bigger/better antennae whenever you can. Anyways, the best way to figure this out is to plug the antennae into a TV ...


1

Maybe something like http://www.caworldwifi.com/images/T/univantmnt.jpg. Clamp the bottom to the existing mast (or a leg) with u-bolts. Then clamp antenna on the "mast" portion of the universal antenna mount?



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