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8

This is most likely due to the auto reversing function. This is where the door will reverse open if it hits an obstacle when closing. One possible cause is that there is an obstruction on the floor where the door meets the floor. Look for any irregularities on the floor and on the bottom of the garage door. You might find something stuck to the bottom ...


5

The user manual for your unit can be found here. According to the document the following are possible when no codes are displayed: Clean inlet water supply filter. On new installations ensure hot and cold water lines are not reversed. Check for bleed over. Isolate unit from building by turning off cold water line to building. Isolate the ...


4

Most garage door openers have a feature that when they encounter too much resistance, they will reverse. This is to prevent the door from trapping/crushing something that didn't get out of the way (a car, person, or your dog). It sounds like the door isn't jamming completely, but it is just "rough" in one spot of the travel, which kicks the the opener into ...


4

The answer is not a cut and dry one in your case. The troubleshooting is a process. You will need an understanding of a multiple light parallel circuit. You will also need a proximity type voltage tester and possibly a VOM. Assuming the voltage feed starts at the switch (not always the case, but normal) you will need to verify input voltage at the line ...


4

The thermocouple insures that the flame is on, it's used to shut the gas off if the flame goes out. Your problem sounds more like a thermostat. The thermostat measures the temperature of the oven, and is used to determine when to turn the flame on and off. Check the manufactures documentation for thermostat troubleshooting and replacement information. ...


3

Turned out to be the High Limit switch. The switch had burnt out, which caused the burner not to fire. Turns out when the limit switch senses the heat box is too hot, it shuts down the gas and forces the blower to continue so it will clear the excess heat. When the switch failed it always told the system that the furnace was over heated, so the burner ...


3

Generally, there are not 2 fans. Instead, there are electrically controlled dampers that open and close based on signals from a control unit. The damper for your upstairs vents is probably jammed. The control unit for the dampers is usually mounted on the wall near the air handler, or directly on the air handler. There should be 4 to 6 wires coming out of ...


2

If you have sensors on either side of the garage door, clean them and make sure nothing is obstructing the two from communicating with each other. Perhaps look for something under the garage door (rubber insulation) that may be hanging and obstructing the sensors before the garage hit the floor.


2

I had a similar strobing problem with a light fixture -- it seemed to work fine with an incandescent bulb, but a CFL would blink constantly. My first concern was a problem with the wiring in the walls, but it turned out to simply be the light socket. I replaced the socket only (not even the whole fixture) and the CFL worked fine. I suspect it was a slight ...


2

My approach (not an electrician, just a guy with a meter) would be to start by mapping the circuit (find all of the outlets and fixtures that are on it), then unplugging EVERYTHING that's plugged into that circuit and see if that has an effect. Next up, I'd kill the breaker and open up the switches and take a look. See if there's evidence of burning or ...


2

I'd start by checking the valve, make sure it's all the way open. If the oven has a cook top, you can probably lift up the top and find the valve towards the back where the gas line comes out of the wall and into the oven. If the gas appears to be cycling on and off while the oven is heating, then perhaps it's a bad thermostat. Beyond that, perhaps ...


2

On top of what other people have said: Fridge (door open, temp low) Computer Thermostat (filter reminder) Alarm clock (low battery) Or maybe it's not a beep but rather a squeak (furnace fan, fridge compressor, door opening/closing, window, water meter, gas meter, etc.)


2

First of all, you need some SCIENCE! A multimeter measures one of three things: Current, Voltage, Resistance. Current (I) is the flow of electricity (how much water goes over the falls) In a one path circuit, the current is a constant throughout (i.e. ALL the water reaches the bottom) Voltage (V) shows how much potential energy the current is carrying. ...


2

It sounds like you have a pretty good handle of the problem. Hidden junction boxes do exist but it could also be a failure along the cable. If you've 100% ruled out all known junction boxes then you need to narrow down the problematic section of cable and go hunting between with a cable tracer. With each section of wiring (ie: junction box to next junction ...


2

Are you sure the circuit was live when you measured it? If you try to measure an open (i.e. off) circuit, you can sometimes read a "phantom voltage" caused by coupling with other nearby live wires. Phantom voltages can't generate a significant amount of current and are therefore harmless, but they can be measured by a multimeter. If you say the fixture ...


2

You need to check out a few additional things. From the information you've provided, your panel and breakers could be fine, but the wiring between panel and fixtures could be damaged. You can use a non-contact electrical tester to check the wiring at a few points. Start with the cables exiting your panel, and see if you can follow along to the fixtures that ...


2

Your heat pump switches between heating and cooling mode through a reversing valve. It sounds like that is where your problem is; it could be that your thermostat has gone bad, or it could be something else. The outside condensing unit is blowing 68 degrees because the system is pulling heat out of the outside air, and pumping it into the house.


2

Check the thermostat O (orange) terminal with a multimeter to ground. Most brands energize (apply 24V AC on the terminal) in cooling mode. A bunch of things could be going on such as a wire loose, bad thermostat, bad control board in heat pump or bad reversing valve but the first thing to check is the thermostat then you can work your way back to the ...


1

Looking at the geometry, it can only be paint holding it up. I would stay away from any solvents. I would add a second putty knife, with a stiff blade. Use a slightly larger (wider to distribute the force of the lifting blade) putty knife against the ceiling (and under the lip of the fixture). Put the stiffer, skinny blade between the wide blade and ...


1

Check both the top and bottom outlets when checking gfi receptacles. One might be serving as a junction box. I have a 70's home and one gfi feeds two other outlets, one inside in the master bath and one outside. When a worker started his electric saw outdoors, it blew the circuit and it tested with an open neutral. I had tested all of the inside bathroom ...


1

As others have mentioned, you need to test continuity of every neutral line from the box to the end of the circuit, and then once you have ruled a bad line out, then you should start checking the outlets if they are all carrying the load of the one ahead of it. To test continuity of the lines you do not need power, just a voltimeter tool so you can shut off ...


1

If your outlets are wired so that the "load" goes through the outlet, then you might have a continuity problem with an outlet receptacle. You need to check the continuity of all the outlets on the circuit if they aren't wired with pigtails and instead have the line connected to one set of screws and the load connected to the other set.


1

I'm not completely sure how the drive elements connect up on this. I know there is no belt. Gear box seems very unlikely. You should examine how the agitator attaches to the drive shaft below the top cap of the agitator. Sounds like it's slipping, and if that's the case, it may not be able to spin either. If it works differently than I think, it could be the ...


1

The self cleaning cycle heats the oven up to 900-1000°F so if it worked before it may be that some damage was caused during the cycle either to the socket or to the switch. Try putting a multimeter on the socket to see if you have power, then click the switch and test again. If there is no power during either test then it is probably the switch.


1

What voltage do the bulbs operate at? Here (in the UK) it is common to have recessed lights at 12V and at 240V. In the case that the circuit runs at 12V it is common for the transformer to require a minimum current. This current will be drawn by a single 50W halogen bulb but not by three 6W LEDs - giving the symptom you describe. If this is the case the ...


1

@shirlock homes answer is great but I wanted to one more possibility. It sounds like the scenario is this: With 3rd LED installed, turning switch on blew the breaker. With it removed, it doesn't blow the breaker, but there's now no power to the other lights. Before you put the 3rd one in, everything was fine with 1 & 2 It seems possible that the #3 ...


1

1 verify that the door is leaking and not some other place. have a helper with you and on a dry week spray with a water hose aginst the door where it meets the jam see if any water leaks in from that. give it 30 min to show up and if that doesnt work try spraying around the outside of the frame and see if it leaks in then. 2 follow the stains to the wall. ...


1

I would recommend looking at the tutorial from SparkFun: How To Use a Multimeter. It is a bit specific to the multimeter that they sell.


1

The first source of information is the manual that comes with the meter. Most have a section on applications that explain the use of the various functions (voltage, current, resistance) in everyday repair situations. Your local library will also have a selection of books on electricity for homeowners that will have chapters on using a multimeter.


1

I'd say it's a fire or smoke alarm. Is it a short chirp every couple of minutes. If its not somewhere obvious then it might be a bit difficult to track down, human ears are very bad at locating these high frequencies. You could try using you computer to measure the volume at various points in the room. Sounds elaborate but it might be the only way to track ...



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