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0

If you're good with a torch, you could braze yourself up a flat foot for that loopy safety thing on the brad nailer - I know that little booger, and how it dents softwoods like crazy. An alternative is to carry a flexible 1-1/2" putty knife around with you and buffer under the safety loop with it. TRY NOT to nail through the putty knife, though. 8)


2

Metal is used because it is a LOT cheaper than a wood cover. You can use wood covers, but you have to leave the top open to allow heat to escape (or have a grill). Also, you probably should make the opening at the top somewhat wider than with a metal cover. I would probably put a strip of metal on the inside of the baseboard to protect the wood from heat. ...


3

Your options are: Use a second layer of 1/2" drywall to bring the wall flush to the window; Trim the window casing down by 1/2"; or Use inch thick trim on the window casing. Personally I recommend #2 and would use what's called a Japanese saw: or a multi-tool with a wood blade to trim the casing down to be flush with the wall.


0

The basic procedure for removing a door is: remove casing, remove screws from jamb/brick mold, and push the door out of the hole, brick mold still attached. Unfortunately your situation calls for some more devious tactics. Because the outer molding appears to be part of the transum casing (assuming you're leaving that part alone) you're probably better off ...


4

I personally think adding trim will just draw more attention to the side of the stairs. And no matter now nicely you trim it, it will stand out as people are not used to seeing trim on stairs. In my opinion, I would just use caulk to fill the gap between the existing skirt and treads. The gap looks pretty small and most people will never realize what ...


2

This is a repeat but it is a picture of what I have done. I also cut the top of the crown carefully into the sloped part to reduce the filler at the bottom edge.


4

You might not have to create a fully vertical face to apply your crown. Crown molding is usually either 38 or 45 degrees (with some exceptions, so make sure and check) and it looks like the wall angle is greater than that so all you need to do is create a flat spot for the foot of the crown to land on. Here's a drawing: I wouldn't recommend 1/4 round ...



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