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1

Base shoe is more common these days, partly for this reason. It's only about 1/2" deep, and generally fits alongside appliances without a problem. Still, I'd bet 3/4" quarter will fit along and under the fridge body from what I can see here. Worst case scenario you may need to lift your appliances slightly using a rear wheel shim and the front adjusters.


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I agree with user47333 about the correct gauge nails to be used. I unknowingly loaded the gun with 16 ga nails , got two "shots" and it was all done nailing. I put oil into it , thinking this is the problem , to no avail. When I looked at the pkg of nails , it then sunk in. Had to remove the cover , remove the 16 ga nail , loaded it with 18 ga nails , and , ...


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(after slicing the paint/caulk seam...) A wooden shingle slid behind a small prybar (http://www.hardwareworld.com/SharkGrip-Prybar-~-8-pGJXJX8.aspx) is ideal. It also helps to find the studs and use the prybar over them because 1) that's where the nails in the molding are most likely to be, and hence lessen the chance of damaging the trim 2) the ...


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Cut the paint line / caulk line on the top and sides with a utility knife. To pry, put a metal blade drywall knife against the drywall. On that, use a small pry bar to get behind the top of the trim. (You might have to gently tap the pry bar into the gap with a hammer.) Assuming you're re-using the trim, pull the nails through the back of the trim with a ...


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Purchase a 1" thick by 3 1/2" wide PVC trim to go around the 3 sides of the door. Ripping to width were it fit to a proper set back from the edge of the jamb in all areas below the masonry cap of the walls. In essence, trimming in out in a typical fashion the way interior doors are trimmed. A thinner trim would work but the thicker trim allows the back side ...



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