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26

Pretty easy DIY job. All you'll need is: a hammer, old metal putty knife, utility knife, small pry bar, pliers, and a pencil. For reinstallation, a finish nail gun really makes the job go fast, and a nail set is also useful. The typical procedure: Cut away any caulk on the top edge and corners. Check any inside corners to see if they are coped rather than ...


16

I would cut the bottom of the trim so the tile can slide underneath. Then you only need to approximate the shape of the tile, but you don't have to worry about perfect edges. I've used the Dremel Multi-Max with the 3/4" flush cut blade to cut base trim and door jambs so I could slide hardwood flooring underneath. I borrowed a friend's and decided I needed ...


15

You can add a center section at the corner that runs at a 45° angle to either wall. That cuts down on any gap you might have, but makes the installation and cutting a bit more difficult. My house has a few faux pillars that use this technique: (I know, I know, I haven't gotten around to touch ups after we painted the walls...) And here's a lookup table ...


14

If it's structural (the tread/risers are supported by it), it's called a stringer. If it's not structural, it's called skirting (or simply a skirt). Source (PDF)


13

You could do this as an outside corner, with just a little piece of rail. I did this with some baseboard right beside a closet (that I didn't want to put trim around), and it turned out well. (Taking this picture also reminds me, I never did quite finish cleaning this all up). The hardest part of doing this is cutting the edge piece so you get a ...


13

Getting a smooth finish without purchasing an expensive HVLP sprayer is fairly easy. Start with any good grade paint, and treat it with Flotrol acrylic additive at a rate of about 1/2 pint per gallon and mix well. If you get a real thick paint, you can increase the amount of Flowtrol up to one pint per gallon max. I use and recommend Purdy brushes. For ...


13

I use a painters multi tool to pry loose baseboards. Its wider and thickeer than a putty knife. It also has a hard place on the end of the handle where its meant to be tapped with a hammer. I find it pretty handy.


11

You would usually caulk the gap between the baseboard and the wall. This is why I usually don't bother painting the trim before putting it up (unless I'm staining it). Usually I would prime the wall first, then put up the trim, putty/caulk, paint the trim, then finally paint the walls.


11

Dimensions on your photo would help make a better model, but here is what I might do in this situation. The easy way End the upper trim with a bevel (30-45°) at the edge of the stair, then continue in the lower room as normal. Transition You may want to use a transition piece to pull the pieces together. You could even cut an angle into the top ...


11

I think you're on the right track. I'd apply enough glue so some squeezes out, wipe the face with a damp towel to remove the residue, and either clamp it or wrap it with blue painters tape until dry. Just make sure that the wood remains flat and not bowed when you clamp it. After the joint is dry, remove the tape or clamps, and you should be good to go. ...


9

It depends on a couple of things. How much time you want to invest, how your current baseboards are installed, size of current baseboards, and what you want everything to look like. As long as it isn't a HUGE deal to take baseboards out I would almost always go with removing them. Your finish will look better. No quarter round looks way more ...


8

I'd agree with @aphoria about just cutting back the trim (unless this is a temporary job, as you're not going to be able to extend it later if the floor gets lowered). ... but I wouldn't use a dovetail saw. Yes, the fine teeth will minimize tearing, but the handle placement and rigid spine make it much more difficult to get a horizontal cut. Instead, try ...


8

In your situation, I'd use reducer molding instead of T molding:


8

Although this is sort of an arbitrary question, and might get flagged, I'll pen a few thoughts. There are no real rules to chair rails, I've installed them from 28 to 38 inches. Traditionally, some feature, like a window sill or a side board dictates the height so the lines flow around the room. But I always say, "beauty is in the eyes of the beholder". If ...


8

Measure in a foot or so from one inside corner and make a mark. Then measure from the opposite corner to your mark. Add the two measurements together for the full length. Note that this process is shown with pictures over on the blog.


7

I have done this 3 different ways: 1) Bevel the edge and sand it to make even smoother rounded edges. This actually looks okay and is the easiest, unless there is the hollow back problem like you have. You'd have to fill it like you mentioned with a custom shim-type piece. 2) Cut and prepare the edge as in the post above by gregmac. That looks great and ...


7

For an inside corner, don't concern yourself with mitering the moulding, instead cope the crown moulding. Basically what you do is cut one piece so it goes to the end of the wall. Cut the other piece at about a 38 degree angle and then cope the angled piece. It's a little hard to explain in text, but here's a picture and a link to the corresponding ...


7

Most crown molding is going to have to be cut flat on the table. the angles are going to be 52 degrees on the angle, and 38 degrees on the bevel. For your corners, you are going to want to cope them instead of trying to fit these angles. Coping is the proper way of installing any type of trim (crown mold, base, shoe molding, cherry rail ect.) How you ...


7

What is important when nailing crown molding is hitting a solid background. This can be plates for small crowns or studs. What I prefer to do is add a profile (triangle) piece of scrap wood, such as mitered plywood or ripped 2X4 stock into the corner and nail it into the plates and studs. No problem if you miss or have to use a lot of nails to find a good ...


7

General practice is going 6 inches above molded area and cut it out. You must inspect the backside of the drywall. If you can't you need to keep cutting out until you hit 6 inches of unaffected wall. You then need to follow a mold remediation plan - not sure how anything else in the wall looks but useless replacing the drywall if you will put up new ...


6

This is a simple job for caulk. Just get a tube, run a bead, and smooth with your finger. Allow to dry, and paint it the same color as the baseboard. If the space is wide enough, first try to close the gap by nailing the moulding into the closest stud. If the caulk shrinks too much, after it dries you can run another bead on top. Note that spackle would ...


6

You might have some more flexibility if you went with aluminum. Something like this: Or this:


6

I ended up taking advise from @chris's answer and making my own transition from actual flooring. I cut away part of the flooring to make the transition piece sit flush on the floor and then on top of the tile. I then routed a rounded edge so the piece on top of the tile flowed down more gradually. I was a little worried about the routed part and how it ...


6

If you are serious about this project, you have two options: 1) Scour various retailers and specialty stores (and the internet?) for a moulding match at an appropriate price. 2) Take a sample of your moulding to a professional millwork shops and they can match it. Option 2 will likely be pricey depending on the complexity of the work piece. We had ...


6

There needs to be a 1/4" gap next to all walls to allow the flooring room to expand. This gap should be covered with trim of some sort. The problem with baseboard alone, is that most baseboard is 3/8" thick, leaving only an 1/8" of an inch for the wood to contract without exposing the edge. This also assumes that the flooring is laid with tremendous ...


5

The strips you made and installed are called extension jambs. We use them all the time to fit new windows and doors. I usually sand and prime them before I install them, but if you have already installed the jambs and old trim, here are a couple of ways to finish them off. Put a straight piece of blue painters tape down the wall adjacent to the door ...


5

Look for a local furniture shop or woodworker and ask if they can make it.


5

I just installed baseboard through my entire house. I caulked the top of the baseboard, as you are thinking. I used a paintable silicone caulk, like DAP Dynaflex. Once it dried, I went back with a detail brush and painted the caulk the color of the baseboard. It's a few extra hours of work, but it looks great. Our painter did a couple rooms, and this is ...


5

I usually prefer to nail or screw a backing piece(Usually pine 2x4 ripped at 45 degrees) to the studs and nail the crown to that. That way you can spend more effort focusing on your joints as opposed to worrying whether or not you're hitting a stud.



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