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7

It looks like all that is seperating the drywall from the tile is a bead of caulking. To fix this, I would first remove all of the existing caulking. Then I would cut out the area of the affected drywall and patch in a new piece, using the factory taped edge as the end that butts up against the tile. Tape, mud and sand the new section and paint to match. ...


7

Yeah, that 4" would be a long cut. It could be done in two passes, one from each side. The middle area would have a bit of an overlap and maybe a blade mark, but that could be sanded down. Plus you are probably going to finish it anyways. What I would recommend though is changing the shape of your transition piece to make it easier to cut, and would also ...


4

I think you should be more concerned with the expansion gap than other types of expansion. In my opinion you should use some kind of separation between the living room and the bedrooms, because bigger rooms require bigger expansion gaps. And that difference in expansion could give some bowing.


3

In a normal room-sized install, both tools are used. The kicker for the first edge and the stretcher for the rest. Kickers are also used in corners where the stretcher is awkward to use. On stairs, just a kicker is used. A kicker is ideally only used to attach the carpet to the tack strip. A stretcher is used to attach the unanchored sides. You anchor ...


3

Since each room in your house will have different temp and humidity levels, the T moulding allows each room to contract, expand, and flex independently of the others. This helps prevent warping and cracking.


3

One potential location is on the last rise on the stairs. This is depicted below on my crude diagram. Make the cut of the carpet right under the lip of the top of the 2nd floor. Use a piece of trim to hide the cut and make it finished. Other options include: Create a small carpet landing at the top. Take the carpet off all the stairs and make the ...


3

A usual method is to go down the edge of the wall with a surface bullnose, showing a "knife edge" at the corner. This means the tile rolls down to meet the corner. Another method, if your bullnose has finished bottoms, is to overlap the edge and go "around the corner", having the bullnose round into the outside wall (the wall that has the striped ...


2

You should not be regrouting between changes in surfaces unless it appears that your grout has damage or significant age. A lot of people will say that this change of surface should never be grouted because it will almost always crack like yours do to wall or house movement. I disagree and I usually grout these areas... but I know there will be a crack ...


2

Solid hardwood is a tough one because unlike the other materials, it expands and shrinks. Laminate and especially engineered hardwoods with a plywood core are much more stable, but they will still expand and shrink a little bit. Certainly more than tile! I'm in the middle of installing plywood core engineered hardwood in my own house and I have tile ...


2

I was only going to post a comment, since both members covered tile transitions, but I seen that the laminate floor transition has not been addressed. I will also throw my 2 cents on the tile transition too. The transition to the tile to wood has been well answered by both members above. Ecnerwal eluded to what I will mention. The joint between the tile ...


1

This simplest tile transition is the integral metal edge. It comes in quite a few profiles, some of which can handle a small amount of elevation change. If you need something more elaborate I'd really need more details and hopefully some pictures.


1

After rethinking your situation, I would cut a piece of flooring to make the transition piece like below. I wouldn't expect the slope at the bottom of tile side of the transition to be that noticeable because of the two lines above it being parallel to the tile.


1

With all the various pieces that make up the sub floor, I would not run tile over any of that. I would use the wood floor all the way up to meet the tile leaving a grout joint's width away from the wood floor to tile. With the wall and tile meeting on the far side, esthetically it may be best to finish the tile there anyway. You may even choose to redo the ...


1

I have done transitions that just consist of an extremely clean edge, with surface heights matched. In my case I was butting tile to solid-wood parquet, so the actual wood movement is very limited. Likewise, most solid hardwod floors will (unless laid very tightly, very dry) simply open and close gaps between boards (one reason narrow boards are more common ...


1

The transition problem that you depict is often solved with a trim strip made of wood that can look something like as shown below. It is often possible to purchase a similar molding and re-saw it into necessary shape. However your could also make your own from a length of the appropriate hardwood using a combination of a table saw and a router table.


1

I'm not sure if I'm following all the details, but it sounds like one question is how do you finish the drywall around the I-beam where it will enter the sheetrock. I did that in my basement, and a bit of caulk was all it needed between the sheetrock and metal. FWIW, consider painting the I-beam a bold color. Make it part of the "look". As for the air ...


1

The surfaces that the tile are mounted to can shift with respect to one another over time and through the seasons. This can be caused by temperature changes and by general "settling in" of the house itself. The nicest way to reseal the cracked grout is to scratch out some or all of the grout in the cracked areas and reapply new grout. Having said that this ...


1

It looks like a sanded caulk. The big box stores have these in their tile areas. I would find something that matches your backsplash grout.


1

Easiest way I have found... Cut off the top part of the trim right when it starts to bevel. Cut out bottom for the taller flooring. With another piece of trim you need to cut the top off at an angle so that the lower floor height is equal to your trim size and the other side matches the corner. Use finishing nails to put top trim piece on. You may ...


1

This can be a tough problem to work out in a situation like this. Particularly if you are trying to run the same type and size of molding from one floor area through to the other. What I have done in instances where the height changes are small is to simply trim the bottom of the molding so it fit into place over a distance such that the it slopes from one ...


1

I would use 100% silicone. First you need to cut the moisture barrier so the silicone adheres to the concrete, Then place your T molding down. Set some weight on it then wait 24 hours. The reason why you use silicone is so your floor can expand and contract: the silicone is pliable.


1

I would glue the guide bar down with construction adhesive on top of the moisture barrier - given that your moisture barrier is pretty tight. Wait a day. If it is pretty solid then I would put the t-molding in with construction adhesive too... tons of glue and the t-molding with a good amount of weight on it for at least 12 hours. You do need to make ...


1

There are several effective ways to hold the molding in place if you were OK with screwing it in place. One good way I would try would be to follow these steps: Cut and fit the molding into length and shape for the spot it would get installed. Check out the fit and see how well it fits down to the flooring on each side. Note any places where it takes a ...


1

For the sake of completeness, here's the alternative way of accomplishing this: Schluter RENO-TK I'd prefer this one (exactly the offset I have), but unfortunately could not find it anywhere locally, and tile installation was already scheduled.


1

In view of the new information, I would remove the mortar in the gap. Seal the edge of the wood floor at the sub floor with a waterproof caulk and use a funnel and self leveling (cement based) underlayment to make a flat base. Tape both sides of the gap with some blue tape to make any cement spillage an easy cleanup. When setup (24-48 hr) and well cured, ...


1

Mesh is definitively a better blending product. I like to embed mesh with the lightweight setting joint compound and then use general purpose (premixed) joint compound for topcoat and blending. AFA plaster cracking, there are large size mesh rolls meant for skimcoating and repairing plaster. One I know of is 36" by 150' by FibaTape


1

Mesh tape works really well. Some guys swear by paper though. I prefer mesh because its really idiot proof and quite forgiving. Plaster will crack though. Just a matter of time and how many tractor trailers roll by your house.



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