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1

Once you have one of these, you'll wonder how you did without one. I got one for undercutting door jambs to make room for flooring, but have ended up using it for a lot of little tasks I never even thought about. The ability to make accurate plunge cuts is invaluable. With a carbide blade, I have used one to cut through plaster wall without the ...


1

Actually useful tools are the ones that are (expensive) well made. It's not very fun when the handle breaks; cheap tools can be dangerous. If they are responsible, they may own some of these tools for the rest of their lives. I'd suggest a minimalist approach to mitigate budget concerns. They need a hammer that the head won't fly-off of, needle nose and ...


2

Echoing @DMoore, Safety glasses! And don't forget to wear yours! And get some spares/loners so that no one isn't wearing them. Nails hardly ever hit the hammerer but often "squirt" sideways and get the kid sharing the work bench. If this is just for carpentry Pencil. (Carpenter's pencils are hard to sharpen. I use "kids" pencils. And they have ...


3

At around that age I got a premade toolbox at everybody's favorite radio parts / cell phone store (for $8 on clearance, when I came home with it my mom gave me $16 and had me buy one for my brother), here's what was (going from memory) was in it: Hammer Combo wire cutter/wire stripper/crimper Level Ratcheting screwdriver with a fairly wide assortment of ...


1

My 7 yr old grandson helped me put together a new bball goal. and he had no problem, and enjoyed, using a socket wrench set.


3

I would add a small spirit level and maybe a cheap adjustable wrench too.


8

I would suggest - to go along with TX's answer: Magnetic stud finder (many uses and kids love playing with it - and educational) gloves safety glasses set of little screw drivers with mini plier (computer grade). Kids have toys they can try to fix and they will need smaller tools to start there and work their way to houses.


15

If I recall my time in the scouts well enough, I'd suggest the following: a set of screw drivers an 8-10oz hammer a set of pliers a small chunk from a bar of cheap soap for coating screw threads a piece of chalk- both to use for marking things, but also to absorb moisture and prevent rust. a small framing square a retractable tape rule If you shop around ...


4

It's not sane. All you need is a utility knife. Even a curve cut is really easy with a sharp knife. But if it makes you feel good then go for whatever saw you want. I do a lot of things that are a little more fun but not always the best choice.


1

You could. It's going to be pretty heavy and a bit ungainly to deal with. It's also possible that the motor won't deal that well with the drywall dust, which can be fairly abrasive. You could look to rent.


9

Here's a low-tech method that's worked well for me: Attach a loop of rope around the bottom corners and pull it up in the middle on the outside with your arm going over it and your other arm holding it stable in your armpit.


4

You might find that spending a little time and effort upgrading your 1/4 mile path, potentially even building some small bridges for the water hazards, pays large benefits in the ease of hauling materials to your building site. You could probably also customize a wheelbarrow for the panel-carrying job - ideally starting with one that needs a new pan, or else ...


3

Less than $50 doesn't leave you too many choices. Both saws overlap in the type of cutting they will do, but are really meant to be used in different cutting situations. For example, I just cut 12 stair stringers using both my circular saw and my jig saw. I rough cut the steps out with the circular saw because it is quicker and easier to cut in a straight ...


1

Go with the jig saw. If you are just learning how to use and the proper safety techniques with power tools, a jig saw is a much better teacher. Safer, less intimidating, not as aggressive and A LOT more flexible. They provide flexibility in what materials it can cut: wood, PVC, metal etc. They can cut material that is smooth, round, bumpy, thin or ...


6

On a sub-$50 budget, nigh onto don't bother. My actual recommendation for a "first power saw" is none of the above - a bandsaw is the most versatile power saw and thus the first I'd suggest buying, without foreknowledge of what you intend to do and whether another saw-type would suit your needs better; but for $50 all you'll get in power saws is junk, unless ...


9

Jig saws are for delicate work; they cut slow and the blades like to bend and break. Reciprocating saws are for not delicate work and cut fast, the blades bend if you let the tip of the blade bounce on your work. Circular saws are for relatively straight cuts, their blades do not break or bend, readily. Table saws are just better circular saws. Miter ...


5

Circular saw vs jig saw is pretty apples to oranges. A jig saw is for cutting curves, a circular saw is not. If you're getting into diy I would probably recommend saving up and getting a tool combo set like this Rigid set. Granted this is a bit more expensive than your budget but there are cheaper sets, and also there are different arrangements of tools to ...


0

They really are different tools. You can do things with a bandsaw that you simply can't with a table saw, and vice versa. If you need to cut curves, or cut stock thicker than 3.5", or similar tasks a bandsaw wins; if you need to cut pieces to exactly repeatable sizes, or cut wide pieces, or make dados (extended non-through cuts) or coves, table saw wins. If ...


0

All you can gauge from that description is the general family of stainless, which in this case refers to the specific grain structure and general chromium content. I would propose approaching the "how good is it?" question by looking at other similar tools. What are they made out of? Are they 5x as expensive as the one you're looking at? You will have to ...



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