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4

It's not sane. All you need is a utility knife. Even a curve cut is really easy with a sharp knife. But if it makes you feel good then go for whatever saw you want. I do a lot of things that are a little more fun but not always the best choice.


1

You could. It's going to be pretty heavy and a bit ungainly to deal with. It's also possible that the motor won't deal that well with the drywall dust, which can be fairly abrasive. You could look to rent.


9

Here's a low-tech method that's worked well for me: Attach a loop of rope around the bottom corners and pull it up in the middle on the outside with your arm going over it and your other arm holding it stable in your armpit.


4

You might find that spending a little time and effort upgrading your 1/4 mile path, potentially even building some small bridges for the water hazards, pays large benefits in the ease of hauling materials to your building site. You could probably also customize a wheelbarrow for the panel-carrying job - ideally starting with one that needs a new pan, or else ...


3

Less than $50 doesn't leave you too many choices. Both saws overlap in the type of cutting they will do, but are really meant to be used in different cutting situations. For example, I just cut 12 stair stringers using both my circular saw and my jig saw. I rough cut the steps out with the circular saw because it is quicker and easier to cut in a straight ...


1

Go with the jig saw. If you are just learning how to use and the proper safety techniques with power tools, a jig saw is a much better teacher. Safer, less intimidating, not as aggressive and A LOT more flexible. They provide flexibility in what materials it can cut: wood, PVC, metal etc. They can cut material that is smooth, round, bumpy, thin or ...


6

On a sub-$50 budget, nigh onto don't bother. My actual recommendation for a "first power saw" is none of the above - a bandsaw is the most versatile power saw and thus the first I'd suggest buying, without foreknowledge of what you intend to do and whether another saw-type would suit your needs better; but for $50 all you'll get in power saws is junk, unless ...


9

Jig saws are for delicate work; they cut slow and the blades like to bend and break. Reciprocating saws are for not delicate work and cut fast, the blades bend if you let the tip of the blade bounce on your work. Circular saws are for relatively straight cuts, their blades do not break or bend, readily. Table saws are just better circular saws. Miter ...


5

Circular saw vs jig saw is pretty apples to oranges. A jig saw is for cutting curves, a circular saw is not. If you're getting into diy I would probably recommend saving up and getting a tool combo set like this Rigid set. Granted this is a bit more expensive than your budget but there are cheaper sets, and also there are different arrangements of tools to ...


0

They really are different tools. You can do things with a bandsaw that you simply can't with a table saw, and vice versa. If you need to cut curves, or cut stock thicker than 3.5", or similar tasks a bandsaw wins; if you need to cut pieces to exactly repeatable sizes, or cut wide pieces, or make dados (extended non-through cuts) or coves, table saw wins. If ...


0

All you can gauge from that description is the general family of stainless, which in this case refers to the specific grain structure and general chromium content. I would propose approaching the "how good is it?" question by looking at other similar tools. What are they made out of? Are they 5x as expensive as the one you're looking at? You will have to ...


0

Other methods: Drill with the spade bit then put the log in a lathe and enlarge the hole out with a boring tool. As above but put the boring bit in the lathe and bring the log to the tool. You'd do this if the log is too big for the lathe. Drill lots of small holes covering the area of the intended hole, then chisel out the remaining wood.


5

The tool you need is a 2 1/2" Forstner bit. There's going to be a lot of torque resistance, so you may need to use a drill press instead of just a handheld drill.


8

You want a Forstner bit and an extension shaft.


1

I had the same issue with my saw and traced the problem down to the switch. Pulled it apart and found the contacts had burnt out due to over heating. $14.00 fix by replacing the switch.


2

Impact drivers are great tools if you ever want to drive screws; they are far easier to use for this than drills are. I think a finish nailer is a bit more of a niche item; you can use it to put up trim (baseboard, casing, that kind of thing), but you can't use it for anything structural as the nails aren't big enough. I've owned two Makita impact drivers ...


1

Rust is not mould, rust is oxidization of the metal and cause by the oxygen in the air. Most tools, nuts and bolts have a rust proofing in the form of a light coating of oxidization that will isolate the material underneath from further rust. A scratch in that coating will then let the rust spread again. For long term storage you can oil the tools.


1

If the impact driver is similar to this, then it is basically a impact screwdriver. They are very helpful for driving large/long screws and significantly reduce the amount of time it takes to drive a screw. The kit is a great idea if you have the money to invest and are going to have projects to use the various tools on. If you are going to be buying this ...



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