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The secret to buying locks Every lock-set in a retail package has code numbers like "14165". This indicates the key pattern it uses. Generally they are packaged in boxes of 4-8 units, and every lock-set will have the same key code. This is good and bad. Good news: If you want your doors keyed alike, find a package that includes every type of lock you'...


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I regularly use 3-in-1 on my oilstones, to no ill effect. A commercial honing oil is thinner, but as long as it can float the metal particles, you're good. You can clean some out with a spray of WD-40, if it's starting to fill up. (The knife aficionados are going to hate this answer. It's got 3-in-1 and WD-40 in the same paragraph.)


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Most commercial honing oils are heavy "naphthenic" oils and "light" mineral oil. Which basically means a thinned (mixture of) oil(s). The weight of mineral oil is a matter of carbon chain length. The longer the chain, the heavier and thicker (more viscous) the oil is. Now, mineral oil comes from petroleum. Honing oil is not like food grade mineral oil (...


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If you are concerned about security (e.g., the previous owner gave a key to a friend) you can rekey the lock rather than change it. Take the cylinder out of the door and go to a locksmith to have it rekeyed. This should be cheaper and easier than buying a new lock.


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Congratulations on becoming a home owner. You will soon learn to use lots of tools if you plan to do any DIY projects around the house. Most locksets only require a #2 Phillips screwdriver. You should not need any special or expensive tools. Just read the directions and follow them. Changing locks is very simple, usually just two screws that hold the inner ...


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I always drill. Works like a charm, rivet's metal is quite soft. On the third picture, rivet et gone already, you should be able to push it out.


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Those are rivets (specifically pop-rivets), they are a permanent fastener not intended to be easily or routinely disassembled and reassembled. There are many ways to remove them Drill You can drill them out with a HSS drill bit of appropriate diameter for the stem of the rivet. Once you have drilled out the centre, the heads will fall out. Punch You ...


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I agree with user47333 about the correct gauge nails to be used. I unknowingly loaded the gun with 16 ga nails , got two "shots" and it was all done nailing. I put oil into it , thinking this is the problem , to no avail. When I looked at the pkg of nails , it then sunk in. Had to remove the cover , remove the 16 ga nail , loaded it with 18 ga nails , and , ...


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If you are drilling a hole through 3 pieces, and you do not want to purchase a 12" "twist" (metal bit) bit to do the job, which would be the way to do it. If you choose to use the shorter version, there is a way to do that too. Main thing is, is to use a twist bit since it is full round so to speak and once it starts in a direction, it usually will not ...


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There are a number of tricks, ranging from placing a mirror next to the hole so you can see more easily whether you are really drilling perpendicularly to the board's surface to using a small square to check this to using a small jig with a guide bushing to hold the nit at the right angle. However, this does not sound like an application where perfect ...


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You could try clamping something rigid and relatively straight (like a T-square or 1x4) to the beam and then using that to ensure it's perpendicular. Then measure your holes and drill with, say, your knuckles making contact on the rigid surface If I were you, I'd just buy a longer bit tho. Sounds like a waste, but when you need the right tool, you need the ...


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Rule of thumb on the step drill bit is it should be used on metal half as thickness of each step. In the pics listed, the long thin would be used for thicker metals because each step is thicker. The fat wide bits are for thinner sheet metal. Keep in mind, the cutting edge is the thickness of the step. It will go through metal that is thicker, but if you ...


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I used a pair of Cutco scissors. They worked great. The foam I cut was about 3" thick. I tried some other scissors first but they didn't even think about cutting it. I think the reason the Cutco scissors worked so well is the serrated edge they have. This made them bite into it instead of pushing back out like the other scissors I tried to use.


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First, Watch this youtube video: Scissor Sharpening - with Paul Sellers It's 17 minutes long, but if you keep watching he gives lot's of good information about working on scissors. You really must watch all of it. Now, I totally agree with MK... the gap is on purpose and forging a no-go. If you really want to do something like that, you should try making ...


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Flexible "putty knives" find more application when performing operations such as doing drywall taping. Particularly when larger width blades are used such as 6", 8" or 10" sizes. Smaller sized blades in the 1" to maybe 2.5" sized are more often used with the stiffer blade for operation such as spackling over small areas. I have found it invaluable to ...


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It is normal for scissors to have a gap between the blades when they are closed. The blades are bent on a slight curve so that there is a minimal point of contact between the two cutting edges while a closing cutting action is taking place. Without this there would be terrible cutting performance due to tolerance in the surface flatness of the blades and of ...


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They should be interchangeable. You can buy a VERITAS PM-V11 BLADE FOR STANLEY & RECORD PLANES 2" which suggests the Stanley and Record designs are both very close to the original Leonard Bailey design. Hock tools say *"Our 3/32" thick blades ... will fit 99.9% of Stanley and Record style planes with no modifications other than a simple frog ...


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As long as you purge the tank until the moisture out you should be fine. I maintain some big compressors 150-200 hp that all push up into a separator tank to make sure any oil is removed from the water then the oil drains back to the compressor and this is a commercial setup. I am guessing you have a manual valve, when there is very little water vapor coming ...


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There is also this type of saw that may work ok for this job: This type has a lot more control than a larger reciprocating saw because the base rests on the surface of the decking board. These do have disadvantages in that when cutting thicker materials the blade can wander from straight down and create a cut that is not square with the surface. This can ...


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What are the common methods for this type of job? The one you described, plus:


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find a scissor with not-so-flimsy build, open to the right angle and insert into the two slot. If the screw is not too tight, this could work



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