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168

PLIERS Used as pliers. Stripper 80 - 22/20 Strip 22-20 AWG (.8 mm) wire. 1.0 - 18 Strip 18 AWG (1.0 mm) wire. 1.3 - 16 Strip 16 AWG (1.3 mm) wire. 1.6 - 14 Strip 14 AWG (1.6 mm) wire. 2.0 - 12 Strip 12 AWG (2.0 mm) wire. 1.6 - 10 Strip 10 AWG (2.6 mm) wire. CUT Used to cut wires and cables. LOOP The loop hole is used to bend hooks in ...


50

The holes in the center are bolt cutters for metric bolts, the loop hole is to help you make loops in wire, see this link for an example of loop usage.


34

It's a bit for screwing in eye bolts, or hooks. Attach the bit to your driver handle or power driver. Fit the eye bolt into the groove. Screw the bolt in/out, without hurting your fingers. The list of bits in this set, lists it as a "Y-shape hook driver".


24

Shamelessly ripped off from here, looks like the primary reason why we still have "bad" screws (flat head and Phillips) is that the "better" types of screws are simply more difficult/expensive to manufacture: The reason for the different styles is cost and torque. The slotted head screws are cheap and easy to make. But they're completely ...


23

Here are some charts from Bolt Depot. Bolt Depot is a handy resource, and has lots of information about all different types of fasteners. Pilot hole size: Wood Screw Diameter: *Major thread diameter is measured on the outside of the threads.


22

I wouldn't worry so much about blades flying out, even when using a cheap harbor freight saw. What is more likely to happen is the motor will burn out quicker than a quality tool. I've bought many harbor freight tools for "time to time" use. I've got a drill press that's lasted quite a long while ... granted I only use it a few times a year so I got my ...


20

See this question. Google Sketchup seems to be a good option if you don't want to pay big bucks. Also, here's a tutorial for framing layout in Sketchup.


20

This is a driver set. It includes a handle (the green item), several bits (lower left) and several sockets (upper left). The long items in the lower middle is an extender. One of the items in the bit tray is an adapter to allow the handle to accomodate the sockets. The bits make it a multi purpose screwdriver. The sockets make it a nut driver.


19

If you can use a drill with a screwdriver bit to drive a screw, then most of the time, use it. Here's when you might be smarter to use a screwdriver: The screw is going into a pre-tapped (threaded) hole in metal, or plastic, or any soft material. Always at least start such screws by hand -- so that you can avoid cross-threading them. Putting screws into ...


17

You'll have a couple choices when replacing the handle, you can either get a good Hickory replacement handle like this, or a Fiberglass handle like this. Comparing handle types is beyond the scope of this answer. Either way the repair starts the same way, by removing the old axe head. This will likely be the most difficult part of the job, as the ...


16

A craft knife or box cutter will do the job very quickly and cheaply. You only need to score the front side of the drywall and then it should snap cleanly enough along the score line. If you already have a Dremel or Roto-Zip, you can get drywall bits for them that will make short work of any drywall.


16

While I don't use hand tools much, I certainly own a lot of hand tools. This happens when you sell them all day. Norm Abram at This Old House provides some pretty good tips on cleaning rust from tools. His tips, summarized: First, store tools in a dry drawer or toolbox. Use silica gel packets to keep this place even more dry. But once rust appears... ...


16

There are at least three different types of stud finders; unless you understand what they're doing to try to locate studs, their results may baffle you. Magnetic - these are a pitiful joke, but they were the only thing available when I was a kid. They don't sense the stud itself (unless you're in an office building that uses steel studs!), but rather the ...


15

You should replace your blade when its dull. Ways to tell its dull: it starts binding it tears/chips the substance more than usual it burns the wood just a pain to use = a sharp blade should let you push the saw forward with minimum effort. If you find yourself forcing the saw forward (not ideal from a safety perspective), change the blade.


15

Choose high quality for the most commonly-used tools. There are a lot of crappy tools out there, many of them sold by Harbor Freight at rock-bottom prices. Those tools only make sense if you plan to use them very rarely, and if you will use them very gently, and if you can't rent them nearby. For the tools you use most often, buy the best quality you can ...


15

A real simple technique I use is to hold up the drill bit and the screw. Hold the shaft of the drill bit up in front of the screw. You should only be able to see the threads of the screw (and maybe a bit of the screw). If you can't see the threads the drill bit is too big. If you can see too much of the screw, the bit is too small. I hope this helps!


14

There are a few different things to look at: Compound vs. Non-Compound - This refers to the kind of cuts you can make with it. A compound saw can both swivel and tilt. A non compound saw usually just does one or the other. Almost all miter saws are compound, and that is probably what you want. Sliding vs. Non-Sliding - A sliding saw will let you cut ...


14

You want a nut driver. You can either get a fixed set of them, or if you have a socket set, you can just get a nut driver with a square head that you clip the sockets onto: Or you could get a set of these, a power drill, and the socket, and use that to get it really tight. If you're going to tighten stuff instead of drill holes with a power drill, I ...


13

I know you mentioned that you want to build the bike rack out of wood (and 2x4s) but... You could probably build nearly that exact bike rack out of PVC pipe or even a slightly simpler design: http://www.utahmountainbiking.com/goodies/TruckbedBikeRack.htm


12

The electric screwdriver can sometimes fit where a bulky drill cannot, e.g., electrical boxes. Apart from that, the drill is a fine screwdriver (assuming it has a clutch, of course, but I have never seen a battery-powered drill that does not). Don't get rid of your corded drill. Battery-powered drills, especially the cheap ones, are not powerful enough for ...


12

It is very hard to describe knife sharpening in text. I'd recommend searching out a few Youtube videos for tips on technique. That said, I'll add my 2 cents worth. Everyone has a different idea of the "correct" way to sharpen a knife; below is just how I was taught. What is the proper way to sharpen a knife with a stone like this? If the knife is ...


11

If this is a one-off project it may be worth asking the ply merchant if they can do the cutting for you, which might work out even cheaper than a cheap saw. Other than that, I suspect that if you do buy a saw you will end up using it more than you thought you would and should give consideration to buying the dearer one, which in all likelihood will last you ...


11

The range is actually broader than that. You can get a Stiletto for about $200 US. The difference between the cheap one and the expensive one depends. Cheaper ones may have handles that go into a head, while more expensive ones may have a cast handle that extends all the way to the base of the grip. Some of the ones that are more expensive and just have a ...


11

Around the elbow no good, for ropes they get tangled and for cords they get ruined over time. See my instructions below, but check out this animation for reference. Keep in mind, I am right handed and this is how I do it: Start by placing one end of the rope between your left thumb and forefinger, and grab the rope with your right hand about 2 1/2 - 3 ...


11

In addition to DA01's suggestion, there are also smaller tubes of caulk that may be thin/small enough to angle into the casing corner. More costly, but you only need a little (if it fits).


11

Same thing you use a Marlin Spike for. (Tapered steel rod with a mushroom head on one end to strike with a mallet or dead blow) It's an alignment tool for drilled holes in metal building frames. During assembly, the bolt holes don't necessarily line up, so you stick the tapered tail through the mating holes in the construction item, lever them around till ...


10

I wouldn't use miter joints for a project like this anyway -- they're mainly for appearance, not strength. Unless you want it to look pretty I'd stick with lap-type joints, where the pieces overlap each other. Then you can just screw them together with deck screws, or for even more strength you can glue them too. If you want to enhance the appearance you ...


10

I'll defer to the experts but personally, I wouldn't mix brands of chainsaw chains. I seem to recall that Stihl chain designs help reduce/prevent kick-back and binding (which presumably explains why they're more expensive). Plus, they use a green and yellow color-coding system to help you select a powerhead, bar and chain combination that complies with ...


10

First, I really like Eric's answer for practical reasons. But there is another side to screw head diversity: Security. In the end, it's usually a temporary measure. Once a company invents a new screw, some third party will start selling tools to remove them. But for a time, any new screw design means the only people who can open your parts are ...



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