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11

If you really want to try to save the plank, BMitch's instructions for removal are spot on but instead of a circular saw, get yourself one of these babies: The square blade shown here will give you clean end cuts, and for your long run, this blade will be your friend: You'll get very straight, TIGHT cut lines along the seams, be practically invisible ...


7

Are the tongues necessary? Can I just take my circular saw right between the boards, cut them way, and then screw them back down afterward? You've been misinformed. The point of tongue-in-groove planking is to keep the floor boards from twisting, slipping and sliding against each other and squeaking (or squeaking more in your case). You still need ...


4

Bite the bullet and sacrifice a single plank, as Steve suggests. If looks aren't too important or you can't find a replacement board, measure the depth of the planks and set a circular saw to that depth. Get a long straight edge (2x4, extra plank, etc) that you can put on the floor, attached with a couple screws or some very stable weights if you don't want ...


3

The plywood goes down so the groove is away from the wall, that way, after the row is finished, or at least when you decide to start the next row, a 2X4 can be placed across the joists at the edge of the next row and drive, with a sledgehammer, the second run into the first. The gap should be 1/8" between ends. The tongue and groove (T&G) of the sheets ...


3

First, a disclaimer: Make sure the wood you are going to use will stand up in the environment you're placing them in. You may be better off using these with the T&G on an indoor project. Weather outside will quickly weather non-pressure treated wood, and decks typically require thicker boards than you'd have inside since they don't have a sub-floor. For ...


3

The combination bit/bearing that you pictured in the original post would be particularly useful for routing a slot along a curved edge, such as the rounded corners of a table top in preparation for the vinyl edge moulding held in place with a spline. Trying to route a slot in something as thin as 3/8" engineered flooring is problematic when depth is ...


2

You can float wood flooring installs over concrete. Moisture is your primary enemy here, and uneven concrete will also be evident in the finished result. I would consider painting on a moisture barrier, and then using a moisture/sound/mold/mildew/pad atop that. You should absolutely glue the joints. Set the first three courses straight and true and let the ...


2

Don't worry about making new tabs or grooves. Just cut the offending tabs off. For the planks on the floor, use a sharp chisel. For the new boards, cut them on a chop saw. You want the two mating faces to be as perfectly square as possible, otherwise you will end up with a gap or one board riding up over the top of the other. In places where you still have ...


2

Where I live old floor boards are like gold bricks. I had to replace a few boards in a house built in the 1920's and to get boards that matched was like $20 / linear meter. And that was just for ratty old baltic pine, with nail holes and dents and stains. Consider selling the boards and buying new hardwood decking with the proceeds.


1

Since it's 40-year-old hardwood, you need a good blade and a strong motor - that means a table saw in my book. I do not think you will get great results with a circular saw. The best tool for rounding over the edges is a router. It will be hard to get consistent results with a belt sander, and it will be slow work with hardwood.


1

Well your pad needs to line up with existing pad - so sand any issues and glue down new padding. Try to use as little amount of strips possible and duct tape everything together. Make sure the length of each plank is in the grooves. Clip the tabs off on the ends. I would glue the ends together. Then I would go back after glue is dried and put 2 ...


1

The door heights don't matter, you can cut the bottoms to fit your flooring. However you do need to be close to the flooring level in whatever room(s) you are attached to. This wood may need to sit a while too and you may need to buy a moisture meter. Not knowing where you are getting it from or the exact grade it is hard to give advice on this. 3 weeks ...


1

Could you drive the nails all the way thru? You might damage the edge of the first board you try to pry out.



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