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If there is a float on the chain, raise it or remove it. You could detach the fill tube and let it just discharge into the holding tank. But: Be aware that if that line sits below the water level, you're likely violating code (there must be an air gap between the fill level and this tube, so that it can never let standing water siphon back into the water ...


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Are you sure that 100% of the fill water goes to the overfill tube? Look closely, most fill valves fill the tank through ports at the base of the fill valve which are not readily apparent to casual observation. If your toilet keeps running and the "float valve doesn't reach shut-off level" don't blame the float valve (aka ballcock valve), it's doing what ...


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I had a similar problem once but the leak was visible and the outside of the toilet bowl was wet. Flushing from the tank produced leakage but flushing with a bucket did not. It sounds like clean flush water is somehow escaping on its way from the flush valve to the toilet bowl. This could be from a misaligned tank fitting or a crack in the ceramic material. ...


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The truth is INSIDE THE PIPE! The shortest path to resolution on this is to send a camera down. Speculation on what MIGHT be wrong is a waste of time. Having said that, I -will- toss in an anecdotal item not yet mentioned. We have a basement toilet that was easy to clog. As part of a previous remodeling, the owner (or contractor) added a wood-framed wall ...


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Improper flushing often results from minerals clogging up the holes under the rim of the toilet. The usual cure is to clear out the buildup with a muriatic acid treatment.


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Always make sure the refill tube going into the overflow tube does not extend down below the fill line. If it does, the refill tube may slowly siphon water from the tank into the bowl causing water loss and intermittent running of your toilet to refill the tank. This mimics the effect of a leaky flapper. Some toilet repair kits come with an extremely long ...


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One could always come up with hypothetical scenarios, but this seems pretty unlikely for several reasons. One: For electric current to be in "contact" with the water, there'd have to be physical damage to wires or heating elements, with just the right bad luck that they came in contact with the tank. And the tank itself would have to conduct electricity. ...


28

I'm from Serbia, just like the OP, and we do have such a myth there. After my initial rant, aimed at explaining why some of the safety assumptions that many answers here may have are wrong, I'll show installation of a typical water heater and explain a couple of issues that I see with the installation. (Feel free to skip this part) First, some background, ...


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In any administration where internationally recognised regulatory rules are used and means are provided to ENSURE that all except a few rogue installations are installed to the standards then the risk of electric shock from such installations is extremely small. I have never heard of such an installation causing shock or death in New Zealand (where I live). ...


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In the UK we have electric showers which heat water on demand - ie they're supplied with 230V using about 9kW, which is enough for a moderate flow of cold water to be heated to about 50C as it flows through the shower. Not only are they directly connected to the shower hose, they're usually inside the shower cubicle - so the unit gets wet and the electrical ...


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Ex-communist or not, real reason is that many older building have substandard wiring, especially grounding which in combination with metallic plumbing can cause electric shocks even without insulation fault.


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If the water heater is not properly grounded, it could be dangerous but then it would be dangerous all the time, not just when you take a shower. Sounds to me like a myth that got started because someone once was injured by a faulty water heater and then the myth took on a life of its own. If the water heater is wired properly you have nothing to fear. ...


7

I have never heard of such a thing, and in the USA the water heater is usually tucked away in some hard-to-access place like a basement or utility closet. Turning it on and off all the time would be totally impractical. I know in some other countries it is typical to have the water heater installed in the kitchen or bathroom.


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You can put the porcelain throne on a pedestal to raise it enough. It's cheating a bit and may cause a few stubbed toes until you adjust to it.


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If you already paid the plumber there may not be much on that front as the cost of that job was probably less that the cost of taking a dispute to small claims court. If you have not made payment yet then you have the option to withhold till they come back and make it right or fire then off the job. In either case you are most likely facing having to knock ...


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It should be no surprise that the toilet dumps its contents into a sewer pipe inside your house, and the bottom of that sewer pipe is plumbed out into the city sewer system (or septic field if you have that instead). Less well known is that the vertical sewer pipe usually extends all the way to the roof, where there is a vent. Gases created by food and ...



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