New answers tagged

1

Some designs of hinge are often fitted the wrong way around. Try taking the seat off and swapping the hinges over side to side. I've seen this many times. With the vertical part of the hinge further forward it alters the balance point and hey presto, the seat stays up. Worth a second look at least...


3

You have some other possible solutions if you do not want to replace with another lid as suggested in the comments. You could make a loop of cord or ribbon that attaches to the back of the cistern lid that you pickup and loop around the lid when it is in the UP position. You could get some of the white stick on Velcro material and put one piece on the top ...


6

If you're open to buying a new toilet seat you can find seats with stiff hinges such as this: EZ Close seat Random example, never used above product... With little kids in the house, I've picked up a few of these type of seat from a local home store. They are marketed as "Slam free", "slow close", "quiet close" and similar. The hinge provides enough ...


2

Pull up the old toilet, finish the tiling job, and drop in the new toilet. Anything else is going to leave you with a hack job that will eat away at your satisfaction in having your own home every time you turn around to flush. Finishing the tiling job may turn out to be dead simple if matching tile is available. This is not likely, though, as anyone too ...


1

You are probably missing a vent in the drain line. The vents prevents the sewer line from acting as a siphon and emptying the bowl. Modern toilets use the inside of the bowl as a siphon to pull the waste down, but the siphon must be broken at the exit of the bowl. Older toilets relied on the force and pressure of the incoming water to push waste down, they ...


1

The water in the toilet seeks the level of the highest level of the high level of the trap, so if you raise the toilet bowl you must raise the trap the same distance. The trap is the curly, s-shaped part of the drain between the exit tube of the bowl and the wall. The highest level of the trap follows the line of bottom of the inner circumference of the ...


4

If you're installing a whole new flange, use the standard rough-in distance of 12" and get a toilet with a 12" rough-in. If the flange is already there and it's less than 12" away from the wall and you don't want to move it, use whatever toilet will fit or install an offset flange.


0

@beast solution is the first that came to mind. Another way to improve this, would be to connect vent pipe from close to each WC UPWARDS to the vend stack above the height was the wc.


3

For this type of valve it is normal for there to be some hissing as the tank is nearly full, because as the float rises with the water level, it is gradually closing the valve. The hissing is the sound of water movement through a nearly-closed valve. If you can trigger the same sound by flushing and then manually raising the float so the valve is nearly ...


0

Put two toilet roll cardboard centres, either side by side, or end to end, and if the modern 4.5/3 litre toilet cannot handle that, then the toilet, in my opinion, is useless. Bunnings and Masters plumbing salesmen say that this is a common problem with modern toilets with low flow rates. The throat of the toilet is so small that, even with increased water ...


10

It's fine. That's just air dissolved in the water forming on the nucleation points of the rubber.


0

The drain line is probably filled with hair and soap, chemical drain cleaners at best push the clog further down and make things worse in my opinion (now toilet backing up) with the exception of “mule kick” that will eat metal pipes and I am not sure if it is even available any longer. What you need is a real snake a small one to be run down the shower, and ...


0

There are multiple possible causes for a toilet that is not flushing completely: the water level in the tank is not high enough (common) remove the tank lid and inspect,the recommended water level is often marked on the inside of tank, either on the tank wall or on the overflow tube. Adjust your fill valve (ballcock valve) to attain the proper water ...


15

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


1

The water that comes from under the rim, but after the flush comes from a flexible tube that goes from the flush valve (typically on the left of the tank) to the top of the pipe in the center of the tank. As the water refills the tank, the tube sprays water down the pipe which leads down to the rim and bowl. This fill tube can come off or get kinked.


1

I've always used clear silicone, for several reasons: It doesn't ruin the clean line of the white toilet against the flooring. White caulk, unless perfectly applied, results in a wavy, eye-catching line against non-white flooring. It bonds well and doesn't shrink significantly. Toilets are imperfect porcelain structures, and as such may rock slightly even ...


1

NEITHER !!! I don't care what code says. I have had 40+ houses inspected the past 15 years, never caulked one toilet, never had one inspector ask me to. I have had a few point it out and say they don't either but that is it. Points: caulk or grout does not stabilize your toilet. A flat surface does this. If your surface is not flat there are things ...


3

The grout may help to keep the toilet stabile for awhile, but to ensure it remains level and secure you should install shims. I've used plastic building shims that can be snapped-off at 2 inch increments. Any flat material that is water-proof will do. Loosen the bolts at the base of the toilet first. Place a level on the rim of the bowl and shim up the ...


3

Code requires toilets to be caulked at the floor, that, IMO is a mistake. If the toilet does develop a leak, it will be restricted under the toilet and the subfloor, and may leak for a while before it is detected. So much for that. The toilet can be shimmed to keep it from rocking. Because of the rocking, what is not leaking now eventually will leak. The ...


1

Get something like this http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KHSLV2G or this http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000BQUJEA (there are other types, those just came up first when I searched). In case the links break: They are wax ring alternatives that are made of flexible plastic instead of wax, so they can take some movement without leaking. There are a bunch of different ...


5

Sounds like a problem with the venting. Your neighbor's toilet is likely not vented properly, so when they flush it siphons your toilet. Contact a local plumber, and/or the building manager, and have the problem investigated.


1

To add to some of the other answers, yes, the tube is designed to drip into the overflow tube. However, if the spray tube goes too far down into the overflow tube, it can siphon water from the tank. It took a long time to realize this is what was happening to mine, as all components were new and functional. I just had to back the spray tube further up the ...



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