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0

Yes but he stated that it usually happens when the tub is draining. If water has been drawn out of the toilet then water would be running as the bowl refills. He should be able to determine that by watching the toilet to see if the water level drops when the bath tub is draining.


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There exists an offset toilet flange. Depending on the access you have to the plumbing below the toilet, and its nature (PVC good, cast-iron not so much) you may be able to shift the toilet location the amount you need.


1

You may have seen, but the Eco-Drake comes in a 10" RI too. Here is the link The 12 inch model seems like it may not do it for you. From the looks of the PDF spec sheet it only allows 3/4" space behind the tank as it is.


-2

I have seen this happen when there are no vent pipes. The water flowing down the pipe can create a vacuum and draw water out of your p-traps and toilets. If that happens you will usually know because you will get odours coming from your sinks and bath tub drains. If you have no way to vent them there are vents they make that you can install under your sinks. ...


2

Plumbing in concrete slabs pretty much requires ripping the floor open to make any changes to it. I suppose if you chose a new toilet with a LARGE base and were very careful you MIGHT be able to keep all the floor damage under it, but that's making assumptions that you'll be able to rework cast iron pipes (not the most cooperative things) through a fairly ...


0

In the process of redoing my vinyl floor with backer board and tile. The flange is set on the finished vinyl floor as shown in the upper photograph. The result is a toilet that rocks,leaks at the wax gasket and has ruined the vinyl floor. It's not a cheap Home Depot toilet (can't remember the brand, but it was about $200 years ago...). Even after removing ...


0

Sounds like you pulled out some butterfly anchors instead of unscrewing them, or even large molly type. What I do in situations like this is to install a decorative BOARD behind the towel rack or toilet paper holder, on the surface of the drywall, which screws directly into studs. This can simply be a piece of 1X4 with routed or finished edges, or ...


1

That looks like standard UK 15mm copper pipe with an olive and compression fitting. The correct term for the "washer" is an "olive". It is made from copper. If it is damaged, you will have to buy new "15mm compression olives", they often come in a pack of 5. cut off the old olive (you can get olive splitters to do this job) clean up the end of the pipe ...


0

I think pdd's answer is the right idea. Almost certainly your flapper no longer seals properly. The fix is to replace the flapper. It's a $5 part and requires no tools to install. It's a 5 minute fix. I recommend replacing with a flat rubber flapper since a rounded/shaped flapper may not fit your drain hole well. They also make flat hard plastic ...


1

My problem was that the chain was too tight and was exerting constant upward pressure on the flapper mechanism. By adding a link to the chain, the problem was resolved.


1

I would use a toilet snake as @Wayfaring Stranger suggested. The home depot treatment you looked at is not a drain cleaner but a septic treatment. You might try warm water. When the water is low in the bowl (as in after plunging), slowly add a large pot of warm water to the bowl. Use warm water from the faucet not boiling water. Boiling water may crack the ...


2

On a toilet installed up tyo code here in the united states there is a valve located under the tank behind the toilet. Turn clockwise to turn off water to toilet. Flush toilet and be sure it does not fill the tank again just to verify and empty most of the water. Where is the leak coming from exactly? It could be leaking from several places


9

In almost all cases there should be a shutoff valve behind the toilet, just follow the visible pipe that comes out the bottom of the toilet tank. It will either be a globe valve that has a handle you need to turn many times to open/close, or a ball valve with a handle that you turn 1/4 turn to turn on/off. If there is no shutoff valve, you would need to ...


1

Slow flushing is not a symptom of a clog in the main line, that's not how toilets work. You are probably thinking the pipe is full of water, so the toilet is having a hard time adding more, but if your pipe was full of water you would have water coming out of your bathtub! And every sink downstairs would be full of water. A slow flushing toilet is simply ...


3

The flange needs to be sitting flush with (or not more than 1/8" above) the finished floor or else the toilet will rock. The flange should be fastened to the floor. Dry fit the toilet to make sure it doesn't rock. If it does rock, use shims to prevent rocking - just tightening the bolts probably will not stop the rocking but will risk cracking the toilet ...


1

We would usually screw it down during the rough in. Having said that I personally see nothing wrong with cementing it to the exit pipe below. Although not my first choice I have seen installs last many many years without screwing in the flange. For example for basement bathrooms I would just attach the flange via cement. Also if you have the PVC cemented ...


1

BMitch's answer is more likely to be your problem but ... One other possibility: the trap is dry due to lack of use. It doesn't sound like your situation but if you have a tub, as an example, that isn't used often, the trap can dry out. Once it dries out, you'll hear a lot more noise from the plumbing. Simply put a quart of water down any infrequently ...


1

The gurgling typically happens with a vent pipe blockage. Without a source of air to follow behind the rushing water, a vacuum is created that will result in gurgling. You may be seeing that now if the vent pipe is partially blocked and there isn't enough air to support the faster flow. It may be necessary to snake out the vent pipe from the roof and/or run ...


1

There is usually a small, flexible tube clipped to the overflow tube that adds water to the bowl while the tank is filling (marked as refill tube on Speedy Petey's diagram). If this comes loose or gets pinched, the water level in the bowl well be too low.


2

If the level in the tank is also extremely low it could be that the fill valve is adjusted way too low, thus not allowing enough water into the bowl from the refill tube. The level in the bowl has nothing to do with the plumbing, it has to do with the design of the bowl. The track of the drain has an up "trap" and then down to the drain, so the water will ...


0

The water level in the bowl is down to the plumbing - specifically, the height before the drop into the foul drain. Generally, this isn't something that can be adjusted, but something inherent in the design of the bowl, in some cases to intentionally reduce the amount of water required to flush.


0

I may be seeing this wrong, and correct me if I am, but I believe the last elbow to the flange is a street elbow, and the flange fit OVER the small end of the street elbow. The fix may be a lot simpler and cheaper than you think. There are toilet flanges that glue into the interior diameter of the waste pipe. Since the last elbow is a street elbow, the ...


3

Your pictures are showing that it will be necessary to remove the existing drain lines up to the place where there is free pipe to cut into thus allow gluing in a new coupling. It will unlikely for there to be a decent way to fix this by any other means. Any type of cobbled together "fix" is always going to be a potential weak spot in the system ripe for ...


1

Clearly the restriction is left of the sink in your diagram. One more question you could consider is whether this is an installation deficiency (problem has always existed) or whether the drain was working properly at one time and the situation has become worse. I would suggest using a video inspection camera to be certain about the location of the ...



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