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0

That gap is why they first invented the skinny long-handle paint rollers. You could get a piece of wood the proper size, paint it, then glue it to the wall behind. It could also have foam rubber (carpet pad) adhered to one side (against the tank). If the block had foam rubber on both sides, I dare say you could just friction-fit it and it should stay put.


3

Entirely normal. Among other things, the tank cover extends a bit past the tank so space has to be left for that. I'd be much more surprised if there wasn't a space there.


0

If the line is made from solid copper (often chrome plated), it sometimes has a bit of tension in it, making it appear to be stuck to the fixture. Try gently pushing it in different directions while pulling down. If the line is a flex line, it may be stuck with a bit of mineral buildup; try gently wiggling it back and forth. If you're not comfortable ...


1

They make toilet flange repair rings. I don't have any personal experience, so I can't say how durable they are, but for a couple bucks it's worth a try. You can see that there are holes to screw through the plastic flange holes, so in your case I'd get a good concrete bit and some tapcon screws. sample image from homedepot.com, no affiliation


0

I think it's toast. Even if you could salvage it, you'd probably regret it later when the toilet starts rocking and leaking. Do it right, replace it. You just need to remove a small amount of concrete around it, shouldn't be much work with a chisel.


1

In our situation, it turned out the high pitched noise was coming from the thin tube that carries the water to the top of the cistern and fills the tank. The tube had become slightly kinked. Straightening it eliminated the loud noise.


0

For the Fluidmaster valves (fairly common in the US), the method to clean them is pretty quick and easy. Sample image from homedepot.com, no affiliation Shutoff the water to the toilet. Drain the toilet as much as possible with a full flush. Lift the float to the top While the float is raised, press down on the top and give it a 1/8th turn counter ...


5

No, the plastic sub tanks are not necessary. They are an after market modification to an older toilet design used to supposedly conserve water usage. From looking at the picture of the inside of your toilet tank I would think it would not be a bad job at all to temporarily de-mount the tank so as to fully remove the baffle unit. You could also replace that ...


1

The toilet fill valves are often sensitive valves with small water passages that can easily get clogged up with debris in the water line. It is a sure bet that this is what has happened in your case. Some styles of fill valves are designed so that they can be opened up to allow removal of grit, sand or other debris. On the other hand if your toilet fill ...


0

Sediment including iron deposits can settle into the bottom of the toilet holding tank. This sounds like what is going on in your tank. It is possible to flush out most of these deposits. Sometimes it might be necessary to take a brush to the inside of the tank to loosen up the deposits so that most of it can be flushed away. Once cleaned up you may want ...


0

Empty the bowl by turning off the water supply, flushing, then plunging. Then use a pumice stick to clean away all traces of rust, scale, lime, and mineral deposits. The pumice stick will not scratch and works great.


1

That's most likely iron rust deposit, easiest thing is to ignore it; you aren't going to be drinking from the bowl anyway. Otherwise turn off the feeding valve flush again to drain and start scraping.


0

Is water going over the holding tank or toilet bowl? If the toilet bowl; then there is waste line blockage either at your toilet (in the bend) or further down line, this coupled with a leakage of seal in tank allowing water to continue to enter bowl would cause an over flow. If you do not hear any water flowing into your toilet and the supply valve is ...


5

It's definitely a backup from a source higher up than the toilet. It could still be on the same floor of the house/building. i.e. The washing machine drainpipe is likely higher than the toilet. The backup can be clear if the source is something like a shower, dishwasher, washing machine. Since you are in an apartment, you should first contact your ...


1

It is made to glue to 3" or 4" drain pipe. I can't tell for sure but it looks like it glues over 3" or into 4". You need to make sure the flange and glue are compatible with your pipe. If the pipe is white it is probably PVC, make sure you have the PVC flange and glue. If your pipe is black it is ABS, make sure you have...blah, blah, blah. The flange may ...


1

I would recommend replacing all of the affected pipe. The PVC already looks pretty roughed up, and you don't want to invite more problems in by using a rubber gasket fix! Start by making sure no one is going to flush any toilets, use any sinks, or run any water. Otherwise, things might get messy. Measure the distance between the 22.5° pipe and the T joint. ...


0

This answer assumes you're just trying to do it right as opposed to having to pass inspection... Code is great and all but I'd be satisfied with whatever you do to prevent sewer gas from entering the house. Especially if you replaced it (even with the same setup) instead of yet another hack job at that poor pipe. Cut the fitting out and do what must be ...


2

Sometimes this is a resonant refill valve -- pushing the toilet, or a minor leak through the flush valve, shifts the water level just enough to open the valve a hair, and then it bounces between open and closed a few times until the water level comes up enough to close it more reliably. Fiddling with the water level may help, but replacing the refill ...


1

They make pvc pipe-removal drill bits. There's a guide on the front that goes inside the existing pipe, and cutting wheels that remove the inner pipe without affecting the outer pipe. sample image from plumbingsupply.com, no affiliation There are also specialized tools, called a pipe debonder, that heat the pvc until the glue starts to release, and you ...


0

In situations like this, since part of the tee is broken, I would recommend using a rubber coupling with hose clamps to attach a new flange to the existing tee. Size the coupling in the store with a new flange and tee to make sure it is the correct fit. It is important to clean up the broken flange in the tee before installing a new flange. I've had good ...


-1

I've been using wax for years, but recently very unhappy with the products we buy in wax style rings. By the time you get the wax ring out of the packaging you may as well be the wax ring yourself, your hands pants and body are covered with wax. We've been using a new product called Sani Seal. Really sweet and very reliable. See their web site and videos. ...


1

If the proper amount of water is not delivered to the toilet, it can splash. I experienced splashing of water with an Eljer toilet when the rubber fill hose was not properly clipped into the (vertical) overflow tube. Also, make sure that the new valve is adjusted to close at the proper tank water level. Another possibility is that the drain is blocked. If ...


3

Water probably isn't "shooting upwards", but rather not draining fast enough based on the inflow of water. Per your plumber, it is probably partially clogged. With a toilet, you want to use a toilet auger instead of a snake as it is designed to get around the bend without damaging the finish of your toilet. If you want to confirm its a draining issue, try ...


0

I'd suggest either using an anchor as suggested above, or possibly buying a rack that you can screw right into any studs, which clearly you'd have to find.



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