Hot answers tagged

38

WHAT?!!! I guess I was just "lucky" with all the 100, 80, 70, 60 & 50 year old toilets I've ever used. That wasn't any plumber, that was a hack liar fraud swindler! The trap is the water you see in the bottom of the toilet! "I'm sorry sir, your toilet is full of CLEAN, it's a total disaster, the only thing I can do is replace it...do you mind paying $...


29

I'm from Serbia, just like the OP, and we do have such a myth there. After my initial rant, aimed at explaining why some of the safety assumptions that many answers here may have are wrong, I'll show installation of a typical water heater and explain a couple of issues that I see with the installation. (Feel free to skip this part) First, some background, ...


22

If the water heater is not properly grounded, it could be dangerous but then it would be dangerous all the time, not just when you take a shower. Sounds to me like a myth that got started because someone once was injured by a faulty water heater and then the myth took on a life of its own. If the water heater is wired properly you have nothing to fear. ...


21

You can try replacing the wax ring. Usually, that will fix the type of leak you describe. Essentially, there is a wax gasket which seals the area between the flange (in the floor) and the porcelain (on the bowl). Due to age/movement/etc, this gasket will eventually fail, and cause leaking when the toilet is flushed. Replacing the ring is a relatively ...


20

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


19

Add a few drops of food coloring into the tank after it has refilled before it kicks in again. Mix it up a bit to make sure it is dispersed. Then watch the bowl to see if any of that colored water leaks though. If so, then you know for sure that you have a leaky flapper as others have described. If not, then the issue is probably on the supply side. ...


17

I think you're confusing the terms "caulk" and "silicone" for the colors "white" and "clear". A lot of caulks are made from silicone rubber, and they can be white or clear (or other colors). To answer your question, I would use a clear caulk around the base of the toilet as it will look better next to the wood. I've always used caulk because it prevents ...


17

Ok all dirty humor aside, that sounds like a terrible idea. OMG, what a mess that could make. First off, the idea is to never plunge the jam further down the pipe, instead the best solution is to suck the jam back up the pipe first, allow any vacuum to ease then send it down the pipe. How this is done is to submerge your plunger into the water allowing the ...


16

I had this happen on a toilet and here's what my research uncovered. The swirl-flush is caused by water-jets underneath the rim of the bowl, dumping water at a certain velocity and angle. Those can accumulate deposits, and as the passages narrow, it hits a breakover point where it is no longer able to create enough swirl. How much/fast this happens ...


15

I would first try to replace the flapper, it may be old and worn and not creating a proper seal. If that does not work try replacing the ballcock (float valve), as these too can become old and worn and not function properly.


15

I start by hand tightening as much as I can, then I tighten a little on each side and check if the toilet moves. If it does then I tighten a bit more, check and repeat until there's no movement. You're trying to avoid bowl movement, so that it doesn't shift or fall over, not to hold the floor up by the toilet bolts. As tight as you can go will probably ...


15

The most common problem that causes the symptoms you describe is a slow leak around the flapper. A very small amount of water drains into the bowl over time, lowers the tank level a slight amount and activates the float valve of a couple of seconds to refill the tank. What you should do before getting carried away dissecting the fill valve, is to check the ...


15

The smell of sewage is definitely a bad sign and means that either a trap has gone dry or a connection somewhere is bad releasing sewer gasses. Maybe this is related to the vermin, maybe not, but its definitely something that needs a resolution. When checking traps, check: Are all your toilets full of water? Do you have any sinks or fixtures that are ...


15

Why you get burned One of the most common plumbing configurations, is a trunk and branch system. This is where a larger diameter pipe runs from one end of the building to the other, and smaller diameter pipes branch off to supply rooms or individual fixtures. If any of the branches demands water (you flush the toilet), there is less water available to all ...


15

You only have to replace the wax ring if the toilet leaks. It's wise to replace it whenever you remove the toilet, though. It's not a matter of age, but the fact that a wax ring is intended to be a single-use item. They squish into place when you set a toilet, and that can't happen very well more than once. It's certainly possible that you achieved a ...


13

This article suggests it might be a bacteria known as Serratia marcescen if you’ve noticed a pink or red slimy substance forming in your toilet bowl, you’re not alone. It is bacteria known as Serratia marcescens, according to Roxanne Johnson, North Dakota State University Extension Service water quality associate. You may find this ...


13

My suggestion would be to put it on the side that makes it invisible or less obvious when looking into the bathroom from outside it.


13

I picked up some CLR and scrubbed all the jets under the rim. I even ran some through the tank - open flapper so as to minimize contact with the rubber and plastic. Using a mirror and a small piece of wire I was able to clean out a few stubborn holes. All toilets were able to take a steady volume of water from a bucket without issue. This lead me to do a ...


13

Anything is possible, but this falls under the Why On Earth Would You category. Removing and reinstalling a toilet is a fairly simple job for even a novice DIYer. Don't let that intimidate you into making your project far more difficult than it needs to be. Without knowing the details, here's a basic outline: Close the water supply valve at the wall. ...


12

If you strip down the floor, it is an easy job to extend the 4 inch PVC to the new closet flange. You have to have a new closet flange anyway, so a coupling, 6 inches of pipe, a new elbow and you're in business. Re-plumb it and avoid a lot of grief in your life, like leaks coming down through the ceiling. The Micky Mouse adapter in the last answer is ...


12

When you can avoid using the toilet for a bit, put a little food coloring in the tank. If the water in the bowl changes color after an hour or so, the flapper isn't sealing properly and should be replaced. If the water is still clear but you see a flow of water, the fill valve isn't fully closing and water is entering via the line attached to the overflow ...


11

Our second shower sits unused for weeks and sometimes months at a time (daughter moved out.) About a year ago, a horrible smell started emanating from that bathroom - after many unsuccessful attempts to kill the smell, I finally realized that the P-trap under the shower floor must have dried out, allowing sewer gas to rise up through the drain. I ran a ...


11

In the US, the typical toilet rough in size is 12", which I believe goes from the toilet bolts (center of the drain) to the studs (so subtract 1/2" for drywall). You can also find toilets made for 10" and 14" rough ins. But, to get more clearance, the easiest thing to do is swap out the style of toilet from an elongated bowl to a round bowl. If you're a man ...


11

The typical toilet tank will have a flapper which seals the water in the tank. When you flush the toilet, the flapper is lifted and water is allowed to move from the tank into the bowl. Once a set amount of water has exited the tank, the flapper falls back down and re-seals the tank. The most common issue with toilets randomly flushing is that the flapper ...


11

The shower temperature changes when you flush (or use water) because the pressure in that supply line has changed. This means less supply to the mixing valve in the same setting. Modern Thermostatic mixing valves are designed to keep the total pressure constant. This means that a reduction in cold water pressure (from a flush) is detected and the mixing ...


10

It's probably the toilet that is the problem and nothing later in the line. I highly recommend the American Standard Champion4 Toilet. I installed this when I remodeled one of my bathrooms and two years later it has yet to clog (compared to the other two toilets in my house that clog on a regular basis). The advertisements show it being able to flush golf ...


10

This sounds terribly obvious, but have you tried snaking it? Depending how long the run is to your septic tank, you could have a blockage further from the toilets, at a point where the pipes join, and the plunger just gains you a little time by shoving crap into the other end of the "Y".


10

Troubleshooting steps/questions: Has this toilet always had this problem, or was there ever anything installed in this location that didn't clog like this? If the toilet has always had this problem then it's likely some issue with the initial installation; the drain pipe diameter may be too small, or there may be insufficient venting which is causing slow ...


10

It's fine. That's just air dissolved in the water forming on the nucleation points of the rubber.



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