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21

You can try replacing the wax ring. Usually, that will fix the type of leak you describe. Essentially, there is a wax gasket which seals the area between the flange (in the floor) and the porcelain (on the bowl). Due to age/movement/etc, this gasket will eventually fail, and cause leaking when the toilet is flushed. Replacing the ring is a relatively ...


18

Add a few drops of food coloring into the tank after it has refilled before it kicks in again. Mix it up a bit to make sure it is dispersed. Then watch the bowl to see if any of that colored water leaks though. If so, then you know for sure that you have a leaky flapper as others have described. If not, then the issue is probably on the supply side. ...


18

This is a very controversial topic. Some plumbers swear that you must seal the toilet to the floor, while others swear that you should not seal the toilet to the floor. Some guys never do it, some guys always do it, and some guys only do it depending on the flooring used. It also appears that some toilet manufacturers mention it in the installation ...


17

I think you're confusing the terms "caulk" and "silicone" for the colors "white" and "clear". A lot of caulks are made from silicone rubber, and they can be white or clear (or other colors). To answer your question, I would use a clear caulk around the base of the toilet as it will look better next to the wood. I've always used caulk because it prevents ...


17

Ok all dirty humor aside, that sounds like a terrible idea. OMG, what a mess that could make. First off, the idea is to never plunge the jam further down the pipe, instead the best solution is to suck the jam back up the pipe first, allow any vacuum to ease then send it down the pipe. How this is done is to submerge your plunger into the water allowing the ...


16

I would first try to replace the flapper, it may be old and worn and not creating a proper seal. If that does not work try replacing the ballcock (float valve), as these too can become old and worn and not function properly.


15

The smell of sewage is definitely a bad sign and means that either a trap has gone dry or a connection somewhere is bad releasing sewer gasses. Maybe this is related to the vermin, maybe not, but its definitely something that needs a resolution. When checking traps, check: Are all your toilets full of water? Do you have any sinks or fixtures that are ...


14

The most common problem that causes the symptoms you describe is a slow leak around the flapper. A very small amount of water drains into the bowl over time, lowers the tank level a slight amount and activates the float valve of a couple of seconds to refill the tank. What you should do before getting carried away dissecting the fill valve, is to check the ...


14

I start by hand tightening as much as I can, then I tighten a little on each side and check if the toilet moves. If it does then I tighten a bit more, check and repeat until there's no movement. You're trying to avoid bowl movement, so that it doesn't shift or fall over, not to hold the floor up by the toilet bolts. As tight as you can go will probably ...


14

Why you get burned One of the most common plumbing configurations, is a trunk and branch system. This is where a larger diameter pipe runs from one end of the building to the other, and smaller diameter pipes branch off to supply rooms or individual fixtures. If any of the branches demands water (you flush the toilet), there is less water available to all ...


13

This article suggests it might be a bacteria known as Serratia marcescen if you’ve noticed a pink or red slimy substance forming in your toilet bowl, you’re not alone. It is bacteria known as Serratia marcescens, according to Roxanne Johnson, North Dakota State University Extension Service water quality associate. You may find this ...


12

If you strip down the floor, it is an easy job to extend the 4 inch PVC to the new closet flange. You have to have a new closet flange anyway, so a coupling, 6 inches of pipe, a new elbow and you're in business. Re-plumb it and avoid a lot of grief in your life, like leaks coming down through the ceiling. The Micky Mouse adapter in the last answer is ...


12

When you can avoid using the toilet for a bit, put a little food coloring in the tank. If the water in the bowl changes color after an hour or so, the flapper isn't sealing properly and should be replaced. If the water is still clear but you see a flow of water, the fill valve isn't fully closing and water is entering via the line attached to the overflow ...


11

In the US, the typical toilet rough in size is 12", which I believe goes from the toilet bolts (center of the drain) to the studs (so subtract 1/2" for drywall). You can also find toilets made for 10" and 14" rough ins. But, to get more clearance, the easiest thing to do is swap out the style of toilet from an elongated bowl to a round bowl. If you're a man ...


11

Our second shower sits unused for weeks and sometimes months at a time (daughter moved out.) About a year ago, a horrible smell started emanating from that bathroom - after many unsuccessful attempts to kill the smell, I finally realized that the P-trap under the shower floor must have dried out, allowing sewer gas to rise up through the drain. I ran a ...


11

The shower temperature changes when you flush (or use water) because the pressure in that supply line has changed. This means less supply to the mixing valve in the same setting. Modern Thermostatic mixing valves are designed to keep the total pressure constant. This means that a reduction in cold water pressure (from a flush) is detected and the mixing ...


10

This sounds terribly obvious, but have you tried snaking it? Depending how long the run is to your septic tank, you could have a blockage further from the toilets, at a point where the pipes join, and the plunger just gains you a little time by shoving crap into the other end of the "Y".


10

I picked up some CLR and scrubbed all the jets under the rim. I even ran some through the tank - open flapper so as to minimize contact with the rubber and plastic. Using a mirror and a small piece of wire I was able to clean out a few stubborn holes. All toilets were able to take a steady volume of water from a bucket without issue. This lead me to do a ...


10

It's probably the toilet that is the problem and nothing later in the line. I highly recommend the American Standard Champion4 Toilet. I installed this when I remodeled one of my bathrooms and two years later it has yet to clog (compared to the other two toilets in my house that clog on a regular basis). The advertisements show it being able to flush golf ...


10

My suggestion would be to put it on the side that makes it invisible or less obvious when looking into the bathroom from outside it.


9

If the water is leaking from the top, then you probably have the shut off level too high (the level set where the float eventually rises and shuts off the flow of water into the toilet tank). Then the water can continue to "leak" out and eventually it might trigger the tank to start filling again (on windy days you might see it happen more as the wind blows ...


9

From your description, I'd guess it is the toilets themselves. If it is the septic system, you would expect to see slow flowing drains/backup in all of the drains on the lowest floor of the house. If it is only one toilet that is experiencing this, I'd guess it is a cheapo low-power model installed by the builder. Do you have the brand/model and stats of ...


9

Use two of the wax seals stacked on top of one another. It takes more squishing to set the toilet down, but the seal is a lot more resilient to shifting. My plumber gave me this tip, and it seems to have worked the two times I used it.


9

For adjusting the water level in the fill tank, all of the toilets I've come across are adjustable, there is no need to put something in the tank to offset the volume. There will be a float of some sort that is attached to a valve. To have less water fill the tank, you want to adjust the float to sit lower in the tank, thus less water is needed to push the ...


9

The problems don't stop at your system/pipes. Just as they don't dissolve in your septic system (should you have one), they don't dissolve in the water company's septic system and can clog the equipment in the local sewage works that isn't designed to handle such "solid" waste. While one or two wipes from one person probably won't do too much damage, if ...


9

I would try a Dremel type tool with an abrasive cutoff wheel. Of course you need to be careful of the porcelain. I've cut many screws and bolts this way. If you can't cut the bolt, you may be able to cut the nut, in the direction of the bolt's axis, then pry the nut apart at the cut line.


9

The typical toilet tank will have a flapper which seals the water in the tank. When you flush the toilet, the flapper is lifted and water is allowed to move from the tank into the bowl. Once a set amount of water has exited the tank, the flapper falls back down and re-seals the tank. The most common issue with toilets randomly flushing is that the flapper ...


9

In almost all cases there should be a shutoff valve behind the toilet, just follow the visible pipe that comes out the bottom of the toilet tank. It will either be a globe valve that has a handle you need to turn many times to open/close, or a ball valve with a handle that you turn 1/4 turn to turn on/off. If there is no shutoff valve, you would need to ...


8

Epoxy putty, found in the plumbing repair section or adhesives section of your local big box store: It's a two part compound that you work together like clay. Blend a small amount, per instructions, then force it into the crack, ensuring it completely fills the crack.



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