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9

Remove the 6 tabs (at 6am, 9am, etc.) and it should stop any automated on/off actions. It's hard to be sure from this vantage, but it appears that 3 of the tabs are light colored, and 3 are darker. The light ones are used to set "on" times, and the dark ones for "off" times.


8

Yes this is bad/dangerous because you now have current running on the ground wire at all times. This type of timer requires a seperate neutral (whereas most switches just interrupt the hot) so that the timer can be powered when the switch is in the off position. In your configuration, the line (power) comes in at the fixture and there is likely a 14/2 ...


5

IRC - 2006 Requires bath fans only if no operable window. Bathroom ventilation can operate intermittently at a minimum of 50 cfm or continuously at a minimum of 20 cfm, the same as 62 Bath fans must meet the design airflow either through on airflow either through on site testing or using their certified rated flow at 0.25” water column. Bath fans must be ...


3

This appears to be a Grässlin switch. Model FM1 DIGI14-120 Here is the manual (and another similar model)


3

A couple things could be going on, as @bib and @BMitch allude: Your transformer could be putting out AC 12V instead of DC 12V. (Sometimes these are labeled VAC and VDC, respectively.) Your transformer may not be able to supply enough current to power the pump. The pump and transformer should both have their current listed (in the case of the transformer it ...


3

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


3

Yes, that is precisely correct. Though I prefer red tape, but that's a preference, not a requirement to go buy a roll. Nicer (IMHO) because you can easily mark switched hots whether they be black or white.


2

This device may help. It is The Shower Manager


2

If you are looking for a schedule timer; not a countdown timer, it's not likely you'll find it with a separate switch on the same yoke. Even though electronics continue to get smaller and smaller, I don't think you'll find a combination 24 hour timer... Yet. It may be better to simply expand the single gang outlet into a double gang outlet. If there is ...


2

I can't quote chapter and verse, but in 10+ years, I've never had a building inspector ask for one. To me, that tells me it's not in the code. Personally, I like timers a lot. To be sure about your jurisdiction, call your local building department.


2

Either 3 timers, one on each circuit, or one timer, controlling 3 relays, one relay on each circuit. The timer and relay control can be on a 4th circuit, or on one of the three circuits if there is capacity available. Whatever device does the switching needs to be adequate to handle switching the load - that is, the relay contacts must be rated to carry as ...


2

I wouldn't bother unless you're going to have your water turned off for a couple days. In that case, turn off the water heater itself. You'll have a hard time using any hot water with the main turned off, so it is mainly a consideration of whether or not it's worth it to keep the water in the tank hot over the period you won't be using it.


2

If the timer is in the fan, it may not be possible to disable the timer without disabling the fan itself. Based on the labels (L,T,N), I would guess that L is the switched input for the light and T is a switched input that starts the timer for the fan. You can test this by disconnecting the T terminal (make sure you cap the bare wire before turning the ...


2

Well...I typed that too fast, I guess. I just found the answer! Sure enough, this is not actually designed to handle fan loads. UGH. Just blew $40 on two of these. Apparently there's some small print. To quote a review on Home Depot's web site: Works great for lights,but as I'm finding a common problem with all electric supplies you must read the fine ...


2

It matters which one you replace, because that will determine which type of timer you need. One of those switches is going to be the "middle" switch, between the other two circuit-wise. That middle switch is a four-way switch, the two outside switches are three-way switches. You can determine which is which visually is you don't know the circuit layout - the ...


2

You'll have to purchase a timer that is specifically designed to work as a 3-way switch. Or you'll have to rewire the other 3-way switch in such a way that it will no longer control anything. Since I can't see the wiring at the second switch, I'm guessing the wiring currently looks something like this... Which is sketchy, since there's no grounded ...


2

It looks like you pull the red tabs in or out to have the device turn on or off for a given 15 minute interval. I'm guessing the black arrow is pointing to the current time. The switch on the side is to manually turn it on or off (or perhaps permanently off or on the timer). You'll just need to test it to see if the tabs being in or out correspond to on vs ...


2

Other than the fact that you already have a coffee maker, many/most coffee makers with timer/clock arrangements will shut themselves off after an hour or so (whether started by timer or started by hand.) The most straightforward solution with the coffee maker you have is to change what you interact with to turn it on - leave the coffee maker "switched on" ...


1

Timers come in two varieties: Timers with a neutral wire. These are connected between the hot and neutral wires of the circuit, parallel to the load. They're powered like any other device, and work by switching the hot (and possibly neutral) wires of the controlled circuit. These timers can control any device, but require a location with access to both ...


1

No. The device you have requires a grounded (neutral) conductor to be connected to function. There's no other way to hook it up. I believe Honeywell offers timers that don't require a grounded (neutral) connection. You might want to purchase one of those instead.


1

You can also buy a digital thermostat with a pass code, no one but you can change settings


1

Yes, it is just that easy. You will need a timer with a 'dry contact' or relay output. If you take power from the pump, remember it is (likely) 240 volts. Removing power from the pump will not remove power from the emergency heat strips, or from the fan. Removing power from the pump may, or may not, turn off the reserving valve (Heat mode / Cooling mode) ...


1

Presumably the black and red wires are the hot and switched, corresponding to your current switch. If the box is gounded, that one's good. The issue (depending how the box is wired) may be that the timer needs a neutral connection, and if the box only has "switch loops" run to it it may not currently HAVE a neutral wire - in which case you need to get one ...


1

I'm surprised that the box or paperwork that came with the switch didn't have instructions, so here is my advice (25 years as an electrician): The black wire goes to the hot bundle, the green wire is ground, and the blue wire goes to the light that is being switched. If there is a pig-tail that acted as an individual wire to the old switch, you can either ...


1

Can I install the timer in place of this switch and tie the load side of the timer with both travelers leaving the box? Yes (probably) and no. Unless the timer pulls an amount of current that would put the circuit over 80% of the 15 A supplied by the breaker (12 A) you can install the timer on the original circuit but don't tap the travelers together. ...


1

You should read the instructions included with the new switch. You'll likely find that the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) wire, the white is a grounded (neutral), and the red is the switched "hot" wire. If there are only two wires coming into the box, you won't be able to connect the timer. The timer requires a grounded (neutral) connection, which is ...


1

I believe that the natural position of the timer is either On or Off, when the grey lead is not plugged in. So: Take off the grey, and plug the red leads in 3 and 5 or in 3 and 4, one of the two combinations should work. Other options: You can unplug 3 and 4 and join them together using a male-male piece of alloy of the same size as the jumper input. ...


1

Here's the datasheet for the switch: http://www.maxtronictech.com/MT-010x02.pdf The easiest thing to do would be to get a slightly different FM DS(3) that has an on/off/timer switch, and set it to on. Problem solved, no wiring changes. The second easiest thing would be to turn all the timer switches to the 'on' position. The third easiest thing to do ...


1

This switch combines a timer and a dimmer, each controlling a separate load, in a single gang box.


1

You can replace your switch with a motion activated switch. You can find them on eBay, Amazon and any electrical shop near you! Or you can also use a timer switch (wall) also found in the same places. As mentioned in comments and also a really cool idea. A wireless motion sensor switch. A bit more difficult to find but they are out there. All of ...



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