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3

These nails are not meant to sink even with the wood. If your framing is done right these nails should provide nothing more than bump resistance for the wall. Your framing should be very snug to joists and let the wood get itself straight. Meaning that the nails at the plates don't do much. When I am framing a basement I usually put in 3 per 8' board. ...


4

If this is a base plate on the floor for a wall, you're fine as is and it pretty much happens to everyone. The nail is embedded in concrete, the floor keeps the base plate from moving lower, the nail's job is to keep it from moving side to side, and the wall you build on top of it is what will keep it from lifting up the small distance you see there. I ...


4

I will guarantee you that plate will stay there until somebody pulls it up. There is a good bury on the nail point, you could strike it with a hammer if the plate is stable. If plate vibrates, there is a strong possibility that the nail will blow out a big chip and the nail will loose what hold it had. To solve it, use a red load, that should get it down ...


0

I always seem to have this problem with powder setting. I have one of the hammer actuated ones like this one (it quite possibly is that one -- I haven't had it out in a while): What I usually do is load another charge in the gun and fire it over the same nail to set it. As far as the safety of doing this with any particular tool goes, my disclaimer is ...



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