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7

Framing is structural, not cosmetic. So wood splinters and rough cuts are not an issue as long as they are carrying the load above and provide a good nailing surface at the correct locations. The part of the home you see, drywall (particularly the mudding), cabinets, flooring, etc, is where you make sure it looks good for appearance, but those looks don't ...


5

Shimming a floor is the wrong way to get it level, it creates lots of pressure points that will result in cracking and more leveling problems in the future. If the joists are unlevel, you need to sister on a new joists to the side that is level. It should extend well past the unlevel section or to the next load bearing structure. If the subfloor isn't ...


5

I think you should seal the wood for two main reasons: the posts are in a bathroom, where they'll be subject to high humidity (possibly condensation) and temperature changes. That's a recipe for warping and splitting in any wood. Even with the thick posts used in a post-and-beam house, you'll still see some ill effects eventually. Doug fir is ...


5

Set a steel pin (1-2cm diameter) or post-base-bracket in the concrete. Drill a hole in the bottom of the post for the pin, or attach the bracket to the post bottom - no lateral movement, also no accelerated rot. Rot is effectively guaranteed if you set the post into concrete. Brackets designed for the job maintain a small space between the concrete and the ...


3

This is a bad idea to try and build your own I joists. Often the building codes will defer to the manufacturers specifications for engineered materials like I joists, engineered beams and also engineered OSB board. This is done because every manufacturer is different and because these manufacturers generally have actual accredited engineers that are ...


3

I am not familiar with metric tables or codes in the UK, however there are lots of free online span/size reference tables for timber/type of wood, LAMS, and fabricated I-beams. I do urge caution if you are considering making your own I-beams. Fabricated beams have to meet specific standards for the type of woods, glues and fasteners. There are often made ...


3

In the UK, house construction is divided into separate stages "first fix" and "second fix" first-fix includes carpentry that the eventual occupier of the house won't see. For example the woodwork inside stud-walls. It is expected and normal that this isn't finished to the standard you would expect of a second-fix carpenter and not to the standard you would ...


3

The roof loading transmits straight down, so the shorter wall and the taller wall will be bearing exactly the same roof load. Shed roofs can leave the structure a bit more prone to racking, which is basically the tendency of a square to deform into a trapezoid: You'll be fine if you do a couple of things. First, sheath the walls with 4' x 8' sheet ...


2

I can think of one disadvantage to timber framing vs. platform or balloon framing, and that's the need of a crane. Depending on your site, bringing in a crane to install the upper members might be a problem, whereas with stick-built, you're not moving as heavy of pieces, so it's not as much of an issue. (it still might be useful when it comes to roof ...


2

I'm sure that will be fine. The American Wood Council has a free load table table on their website. If you assume a conservative 1400psi allowable bending stress, a single 6x6 with 12' span can support about 2000 lbs. So your double 6x6 can support at least 4000 lbs (possibly more if you do a good job bonding the two members together so that there's no ...


2

There is no problem flush framing the LVL in the ceiling as you suggest, provided it physically fits in the space available. If the LVL is placed directly over the 4x10, the ceiling joists will need to be cut to make room for the LVL. If this cutting keeps them from bearing on the 4x10, they need to be shored up until the LVL and hangers can be fitted. A ...


2

There is okay sloppy, and there is bad sloppy. Bad sloppy has an impact on the finish of the house. For example, if you don't crown your joists correctly, your floor will be a bit wavy. If you don't choose good studs for your kitchen, it will be harder to hang cabinets and they won't look as good. Neither of these violate building code, but you can notice ...


1

Hmm I dont have enough reputation to comment individually being a noob, but just wanted to say thanks to both for those answers. The brackets are exactly what I was after, but I had no idea they existed. Thanks very much for taking the time to pass on the information. I'll get hold of those Simpson strong ties. Cheers all!


1

In my opinion, I would do what I could to keep the wood separated from the concrete, and any kind of puddling that would occur during the wet season. There is a type of post bottom that is galvanized that will handle any contact with dirt, pressure treated wood, what have you. Simpson is one of the brands, if your posts are 6"X6" the model is here. Others ...


1

Yes. Based on the load charts posted by Henry, a 6x12 beam on a 12' span is at least capable of supporting just over 6,000 pounds. With all three swings going in synch with a 450 lb person on each, the load is 450*3 per swing, *3 for 3 swings, so: 450*3*3 = 4,050. Your 6x12 beam over 12' will have 2,000 pounds of force minimum, to spare.


1

Notches in structural members such as floor joists cause stress risers that decrease the strength greater than the material removed. A scoop cut reduces the strength only by the removed material and no more. The scoop can be freehanded if it does not show, so it may be faster than carefully cutting a notch. In constructions where the member is significantly ...


1

If I understand correctly, you are trying to fill i-joist bays with insulation. If that's so, then you should do a simple 2x4 stick frame 24" OC (this will be your structure), sheathe with 1/2" (or 5/8) plywood, air barrier, then on the outside attach your i-joists vertically to be filled with insulation. Your joist will then be similar to a larsen truss ...


1

The pair of 6x6 timbers spanning the twelve foot distance should be plenty strong to hold up the swings and swingers. I do see a problem with just using a single post for the verticals on each end. Swings can expose a lot of sideways force and so the posts need more support than you have described. You should add diagonal braces as in the picture below where ...



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