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The bottom edge of the backer should terminate above the upper most edge of the pan. The tile should come further down over the rim and occlude the rim flange and terminate about 1/4" above the pan shoulder. That 1/4" gap should be caulked with waterproof caulking.


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In the case of a very small bathroom I tend to lay the tile out on the doorway, where the pattern and position are most conspicuous. I usually center either a tile or a joint. In the case of 12" tiles this is even more impactful, as an off-center doorway catches the eye. Then, lay out tiles in both directions and see how they interact with walls, plumbing ...


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You can start wherever you like - there are consequences, though. The reason for normally starting in the middle of the floor is that walls are often (always...) NOT straight or square, and thus a better job results from starting in the center and trimming ALL the walls, rather than starting along one or two walls. Thus, for a "4x6" room, you'd have 3 full ...


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The reason to start in the center is to make the room look even. By measuring each end then putting a line down the center you will be able to follow that and any out of square errors are cut in half. The molding/ mop board will help hide the edges. If you want to start from 1 wall pick the wall that has the largest view from the door and go from there would ...


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Instead of tile, consider 9/16"-ish thin brick veneer, which looks good in combination with concrete block. Something like this: You could put a wire lath over the blocks, and then just use mortar to adhere the brick to the lath/blocks. Another option would to be run a 1x8 cedar "trim" board to cover the horizontal concrete blocks. This would look ...



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