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If the bathtub flange is too proud of the studs to allow the backer board to fit acceptably, the studs should be shimmed out so they are even with the flange. If the manufacturer of the tub says so (and they probably do), the backer board should go over the flange. Find (or make) some wood strips of suitable thickness, and glue or staple them to the studs ...


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I found that the bathtub was not close enough to the studs for the backer board to go below the flange without bending one or the other. So I put backer board down to 1/8 inch above the flange with vapor barrier behind and down into the tub enough to protect it from dripping thinset, and placed the tile down to 1/8 inch above the tub. That way everything ...


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The basic requirement when two tiled/ceramic surfaces meet at an angle other than the same plane is to use silicone. Do not use grout as invariably there is movement which will crack the grout and allow water egress into other substrates and weaken them, which will give you a headache. Some things to check: Get a grout scraper and scrape the joints from ...


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Call up one of the suppliers of polymer-modified thinset, and see what they say. They are the ones who can tell you whether it works or not.


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I did something similar but the tub was a regular one with the acrylic surround. They had put just regular drywall behind the acrylic (with poor sealing) so the drywall was rotting out. That made it reasonably easy to remove it all but it was a mess. My first thought was that you might have drywall behind your acrylic tub and if so, what kind of condition ...


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I have done almost this exact same retrofit. It was a lot of work, but you can leave the existing tub. I refinished mine with a Rustoleum epoxy product, but that's another story. Basically, depending on the tub, I would take everything down to the studs, and start with a good masonry board, and any possible structural/plumbing changes you might need.' The ...


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I accepted answer but wanted to provide my line of thinking also, and some facts that were missing in initial question, and that is that length of the tile is 18" and that there will be a 1" overhand over the circle. Here is how I calculated it: Circumference of the circle is 43.98, let's round it up to 44. Since I want the tiles at the end not to be cut, ...


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For your circle & tiles: 12-1/4 inches if you leave the tile full-width at the outside edge - tile plus grout. 2 pi R is circumference - 43.923 feet. 527.79 inches. Divide by 12.25 to get number of tiles. 43.084 - depending on the project, you either figure 43 is close enough (0.27 inch grout line rather than 0.25) or you use 44 tiles and trim more ...


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Assuming you are just going to tile a simple circle with a radius of 7', the calculation is easy to estimate number of tiles. πR2 = Area I'm going to use inches here: Radius is 84" = surface area of 22,156" squared. It wouldn't be out of the question to calculate the number of tiles out of this, and add in a percentage for breakage/cuts. based on a 12" ...


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When you spray the tiles, where does the water come from? If the shower's plumbing, the leak may be arising from feed lines junctions beneath the tile at the head or the faucet handle. I'd start by spraying the tiles without using water from the shower's plumbing. Pour a few gallons of water from pails (filled elsewhere) onto the tile to confirm that the ...



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