Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I don't think this is an issue. You aren't blending the water into the mix. You are basically introducing the water to the outer skin of the thinset. Yes some may get into the "inners" but I believe this would be a minute amount and I personally would be cautious but not worry too much. I might delay grouting for a few days and thoroughly test the tiles ...


1

I have tiled my own floors, ran base, wood and tile in one room or another. I have also flushed toilets and had them overflow. The construction of wood framed homes inherently allows for water which naturally seeks the lowest point will find the gaps at the plate line to the underlayment, (and tile!!) all around the perimeter of any bath. To me that has a ...


-1

You can find a lot of valuable information on tiling information at The Floor Elf He has a summary on grout vs. caulk. The term he uses is "changes in plain" and makes good arguments for using caulk. Since you will be putting down baseboard it wont really be seen so finding a perfect match in color is not an issue. Here is a summary from the article at: ...


4

If all interior walls or, if insulated exterior walls,no need to fill gap with anything. Just get your baseboard moldings up to finish the job


0

I suggest you lay down plywood over the planks with subfloor glue and decking screws. After that I would use a thin layer of thinset under the hardiboard (per its installation instructions) and also screw it using the hardi-screws. Install the backer tape as you tile


1

The installation manual for HardieBacker suggests to embed it in thin-set and it should be installed over plywood. Thus I would suggest removing the current wood planks flooring, install a 3/4" outdoor grade plywood, thinset and then your HardieBacker (screwed down). All of this is to prevent as much movement in your substrate and avoid cracks in your ...


0

I normally would use 1/2" HB for this. However there is a lot that goes into making flooring calculations so you might be OK with 1/4" (but I would go with 1/2"). You will just screw the HB into the planks with backer screws. Try not (don't) screw into the joists below the planks. This should be pretty easy since you have 1/4" view holes in between each. ...


1

I have done several tile floors by just screwing the hardie board down and then laying thinset and tile right on top. I only just heard recently that some people recommend that you should lay down thinset under your hardie board. Since you are putting down hardie board on boards with small gaps, I would not recommend trying to put down thinset under it. It ...


-1

I've been using wax for years, but recently very unhappy with the products we buy in wax style rings. By the time you get the wax ring out of the packaging you may as well be the wax ring yourself, your hands pants and body are covered with wax. We've been using a new product called Sani Seal. Really sweet and very reliable. See their web site and videos. ...


0

In almost all cases this is a no. There are waterproofing systems you can use but not flooring pad. When you lay your tile the pad will move a little and cause issues. In essence with a pad you are creating a giant floating tile floor. Note: To reduce sound from the floor you want to do two things. Build up the subfloor. Adding an inch of plywood ...


0

Subject to both the tile and underlayment manufacturer's installation requirements, yes. It is common for such manufacturer's to have technical support departments and contacting them will often provide a wealth of expert advice.


0

Normally you would get something like the picture below to cover the side of the tile. But it generally has to be installed under tile. (you could still try it out and mud/caulk on the flat end but I don't see it lasting long looking good in a damp area) Now you will have to go with some kind of bullnose or trim piece, much like you would trim out a ...


0

Typical requirement for US building codes is l/360 live load deflection limit. So it is not quite accurate to classify this as a correction if the design deflection is l/337. If the finish material requires a stiffer floor, then a structural change is required for aesthetics and or performance, but not for structural safety. Structural modifications will ...


1

I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included