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1

I would have to agree with @Jack that this is likely possible (and also that you've want a qualified fabricator). However, I wouldn't risk doing this without consulting an engineer and this is why: Counter-weight system: Lets assume that just for the sake of argument that the door itself (the side labeled "B") weighs 300 pounds (metal, tile, thinset, ...


2

Your idea is possible. It will take as you may know already, a custom metal fabricator who is certified, to build to insure all welds will hold up under the weight of the assembly, since it will weigh hundreds of pounds. Using aluminum to make the base, sealed bearings in proper housings for the pivots. Counterbalance filled with lead to ease its operation, ...


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I have used a top coat of Parks Super Glaze in high traffic areas. It is shiny but it finishes off really nice and the stuff is really hard after a day or two. There are other similar products as this but I have not used them recently.


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I like the hardness of enamels. Oil based trim paint or the newer water borne oils are quite tough.


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I run my dremel at an angle all of the time for wider grout lines. Actually this keeps it from jumping. I am glad you ordered the correct stuff. Premix is crap and you have no idea how long it has been on shelf. When I am doing small/medium jobs I use big juice jugs to mix the grout - cut off the top few inches. Now when you are mixing just let there be ...


1

Here is an idea to consider. If the tile comes off the cement board fairly easy, you could leave the cement board, scrape off the thinset and lay your foam and laminate over the cement board. Just a thought depending on the overall thickness you need to achieve.


1

If it was installed correctly, the cement between cementboard and wood will be thinset and it will break off the wood fairly easily - it's put there to fill the space well, not to actually bond it particularly. If it was glued down with construction adhesive you might be in for a more miserable time. Safety glasses, gloves, and a sledgehammer to get started. ...


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There's actually no need to level the subfloor to install a hardwood or laminate floor. The subfloor needs to be flat, not level. Now, leveling out the floor may have other benefits, of course. But, strictly speaking, it isn't necessary for the type of flooring you want to install.


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Self-levelling underlayment (or floor leveling compound) - basically runny, usually gypsum - based cement product. Read the label before buying - get one that can manage the depth you need, or figure out how many layers you'll need to pour it in - some can be poured full-depth, others may need to be 1/2 inch or 1 cm at a time. One example (image from US ...


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According to the manufactures install specs, a separate vapor barrier is not required if you seal between panels with a waterproof sealant/caulk. I found the complete install specs for you here: http://www.certainteed.com/resources/CTG-2509_Diamondback_Install_Guide_Eng.pdf



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