New answers tagged

1

thats drypack. its an older way to prep a floor to allow for tile installation. it was used to allow for the floor to breathe, so any moisture that got past the tile mortar didn't get trapped between the tile and the base (as it would if you just used concrete). nobody does it anymore because the last two decades have seen the use of polymeric modifiers ...


7

This floor has been floated, a very common and traditional method for preparing surfaces for tile. To "float" is to apply a cement and sand mix similar to concrete but without rocks, gravel or coarse sand. A 2" thick float is not uncommon at all. It is often applied using a "dry pack" method wherein only enough water is mixed to ensure proper set but wet ...


1

Looks like they poured the floor for the tile backing. You could use sackrete to fill the area. Once your tile is chipped up use a self leveling compound to prep for whatever type of flooring you want to use.


2

lol lol Walls don't breathe and you already have them completly covered, with drywall mud and paint. I don't think your friend is quite qualified to tell you anything when he has no idea what he's talking about. Tile all the walls all the way up if you want to.


2

Pull up the old toilet, finish the tiling job, and drop in the new toilet. Anything else is going to leave you with a hack job that will eat away at your satisfaction in having your own home every time you turn around to flush. Finishing the tiling job may turn out to be dead simple if matching tile is available. This is not likely, though, as anyone too ...


1

Some basic comments on what I would do: First I see that you cut out a 18-24 inches beyond the tub. That is fine. But I like to see a 2x4 right where you would put a shower curtain up and another to the far right to help handle the drywall. Flip these 2x4s on their side since you have electric. If your gap is too big then add 1/4" drywall behind ...


1

OP's comment: "The flooring is coming up next." So this is a gut job. Remove the rest of that wall's drywall and shim every stud with 2x4s attached to their sides, letting them project as needed (a six foot level is your friend here). Drywall is the enemy. Big hole/little hole = same amount of work. Use an 'F' profile style Metal Bullnose Tile Strip. ...


2

I see that the floor tile (and possibly the plumbing, a cement bed, or whatever) prevent you from moving the tub. That was going to be my first suggestion. If it's a possibility, do that. Move it only as far as necessary toward the long wall to make it flush with the cement board. Otherwise, I also see that you have the drywall cut back some distance on the ...


0

Yes you must remove all of the thinset - FOR SURE. Thinset is not meant to be exposed and a leveler on top of it will not protect it enough. From walking and moving furniture you will end up with chunks of thinset/leveler and it will just be a mess. You either have backer board or plywood under the thinset. You have would really grind off thinset in ...


0

Knee pads + Cordless Oscillating tool with scraper blade. Provided it's hardened glue, and not gooey sticky stuff.


0

As noted previously, cracks in the mortar bed come from movement. What I would recommend, is replacing the showerpan with either a new mortar bed/ pvc liner, or to use (my personal preference) a Schluter Systems shower pan, or kit. It is easier to install, and has the correct slope to the drain, and carries less weight on the subfloor. It will also prevent ...


0

The fix you have done, is a temporary fix, the crack is an indication of movement, the epoxy will crack eventually. the solution in the near future will be to redo the shower pan and eliminate the cause of this crack.


1

You don't have to. It is completely up to you. Sealing the grout is doing absolutely nothing as far as water-proofing your current setup. I Redgard/HB many showers/tubs and here is what I do: unsanded - gets sealant. In my opinion it stains easily, especially below level where water constantly hits. sanded - don't seal it. It looks better unsealed and ...


0

I always seal the grout, whether or not I'm after one of Custom Building Products' warranties: A complete CUSTOM Shower Installation System of products must be used including Shower Slope, Shower Base, ANSI A118.4 Bedding Mortar, Sealant, and suitable CUSTOM RedGard Waterproofing and Crack Prevention Membrane to qualify for this limited warranty. –CBP ...


2

Clarification from the manufacturer: "Natural stone should be sealed prior to grouting. A premium penetrating sealer is recommended for a natural look. A stone enhancing sealer can be applied to darken or highlight the features of the stone. The sealer is safe to apply over the entire mosaic with the glass."


1

If you don't remove asbestos for a living, the realistic impact of one removal job on you is low. Due diligence: use boiling water to loosen the adhesive and to give any dust something to stick to. Use a respirator intended for asbestos, put up dust barriers and when removal is complete, thoroughly ventilate the area and you'll be fine. If you're really ...


2

I asked a related question here some time ago. I was told that (a) the safest way to take these up was to heat them and the adhesive so they could be lifted without breaking, and that (b) encapsulating them under another floor was an entirely reasonable approach. Asbestos is not automatically a hazard if it isnt experiencing wear and shedding fibers, just as ...


2

I've been laying tile every day for over 20 years. These other folks are making too much of this. Doesn't matter if phone line works or not. Seal it up in the wall. If using 12" x 12" or larger tile just tile over the hole. If you need it patched do it the quick & easy way. Use Hardie backer mesh tape to cover hole then spread thinset over it. Next day ...


-2

Bandage the insulated tips with duct tape if using electrical tape as heat over time will loosen the tape, and you don't want a short on your phone line. The bandaging might be overkill but it's safer.


2

Yes, if the wire is out of service, remove the plastic panel, secure the wire with insulation tape and put your tile over it. "Out of service" not connected to the main telephone system! If it connected, but you have other PSTN jacks in the house, cut the wire ONE by ONE with insulated wire cutters!. Then insulate each wire with tape and finally the entire ...


0

There are two answers to this: Buy a glass rounded piece that will fit (very hard to find but your specialty shops will have them or can order them) just like an artist would do, break the glass into small enough pieces that you can make a rounded joint out of them.



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