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3

$65 at Harbor Freight or other import discounter. You are wasting your time with a scoring cutter. If you had a lot to do I would recommend a quality domestic saw, but for a one time job this saw will work so well you will kick yourself for not biting the bullet and buying one before you even started the job.


2

After wasting my money on tile nippers (they don't cut where they are supposed to any better that what you are having, IME) I went the dry diamond blade in an angle grinder route, and short of a wet saw I can't justify, would not do it otherwise. With dust mask and eye & hearing protection, of course; incredibly loud should not be something you ...


3

It sounds like you're being too aggressive. You want to snap the tile with gentle pressure, not a sharp rap. Score the tile, as you've done. Place the tile on another tile, as you've done. Place one hand flat, palm down on each side of the scored line (place them close-ish to the line). Apply gentle downward pressure to the tile, until it snaps. A tile ...


3

I think your problem is simply that you are using the wrong tool for the job. To get good cuts in tile use a tool designed to cut tile, not glass. They are similar but designed to do different jobs. If the right tool is unavailable you might try changing how you break the tile. I have a tile cutter like this: . The 'foot' is used to apply pressure and break ...


0

The thinset will not stick to the smooth finished floor. You could just screw and thinset down 1/4" concrete board over it though and then install tile like normal. Another option I would not recommend but is an option is you can probably lay tile over them with mastic instead of normal thinset. But you will not be able to walk on the floor for upwards of ...


0

I hate to tell you that I know from calling the manufacturers of both hardiebacker and durock that they do no support concrete installations. Both indicated that it would probably work fine but they simply haven't tested it. I have personally used it in a very small area that I needed to raise - very small. You want to treat it like tile (thinset with ...


7

What's done is done. I'd grout and generally move on with life, and only revisit it if and when the tiles start popping on their own, which may never happen. You are NOT a professional tile installer who would be well advised to rip out and do it over for the sake of their reputation. So you don't need to act like one.


0

I decided not to tile the corner, however, if I did tile the corner, I think I would use position the tile vertically around the corner. I am planning on laying the tile horizontally for the walls and use some of the tile laid vertically for the edges. The corner would then compliment the edges. The only drawback I see to this is that the grout lines will be ...


0

A Google search for "ansi A108.5.2.4" (no quotes) finds a PDF as the first hit containing:


2

I'd suggest you get a small tub of premixed grout, a float, a sponge, and spend an hour fixing the problem. Be sure to remove any loose grout. (Something as simple as a utility knife will work for this. Wear gloves to avoid skinned knuckles.) If you want an even more durable job, score all of the existing grout along the edge of the tile (so 2 cuts per grout ...


-1

Take a look here . I know it is not your county but it may close.


0

The grout was not installed properly. The grout probably had too much water in it and/or was wiped too early removing the grout from the joints as it was sponged. Removal and properly grouting will fix it. Mix the grout with the proper amount of water and carefully wipe the tile so the grout is not removed from the joints.


0

Typically, you would install the shower curb/pan first, then install your underlayment, concrete backer board in this case, up to it. As to the floor, we usually extend the concrete board as far as we can under the wall finish, and have a gap between the bottom of the wall finish and the floor finish that gets covered up by the base to mitigate water damage ...


0

Cover wood sill with red guard or equivalent. Install concrete board over sill; going through the trouble of getting it to slope slightly towards shower by building up mortar under it is not a bad idea. Do not red guard the cement board so the thinset has a good rough surface to adhere to. Install tile sloped towards shower by building up thinset on back ...


1

Use your subway tiles, just use two instead of one. Cut them so you split the difference on the width so they are the same size, rather than using a full tile and a cut strip.


3

First, make sure the rough sill slopes toward the shower. Measure it with a level; if it's not appropriately sloped, build it up with more mortar to create the requisite slope. Then, once you've painted all that cementboard with RedGard, the whole assembly should already be waterproof. Just tile over RedGard on the sill however you like. Any water that gets ...


0

Check out this website to see some of the newer tile transitioning pieces. They have a link to you tube videos explaining their products which are sold at most Big Box Hardware Stores. I ran into the same issue just because my wet tile saw blade was getting dull and leaving not so perfect edges. Since my mesh-backer tile didn't sell a rounded edge for the ...


0

The crack in the basement floor looks like it goes under the wood as well. Cracks in foundations tend to let water in. Water + wood = mold. I hope you have sufficient crack repairs done and an underlay in place that will help to prevent moisture transfer into the wood floor, but most options I am aware of would make the wood floor match up closer in height ...


0

Ditra is excellent, why not use a transition strip from the tile to the hardwood. You can get them in marble, stone or metal and they are perfect for situations like this. You don't want to be tearing up the cracked tiles in 1 year.


0

Use a thinner crack isolation sheet, ask for "slip-sheet" at the tile store. Some will bridge cracks up to 1/8" wide. Note, although slip-sheet works great for cracks caused by horizontal movement, they are not great for preventing cracks caused by vertical movement.


0

Rounding the edges of all the tiles is out of the question. Though, you might want to try to file down some of the worst offenders. Ad hoc grout is likely to crack. At the very least, scarify the entire surface of the grout first. Re-grouting it, it isn't going to be much different but it could be a little better. You don't have to get it all out, just ...



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