Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Having done a few tile jobs for myself, my rule of thumb is 25%. That is 1/8" grout lines should vary no more than 1/32. I'm somewhat more stringent on continuations. e.g. I don't like a line that goes from 5/32 to 3/32 in a jump. For this reason I prefer running bond patters. One direction I can adjust without it being noticeable. I find 1/8 a very ...


0

Floor first. Tile. Cut out the the bottom of the drywall so that the tile can sit underneath it. Throw some cardboard on top of your tile, sit tile board on tile and put it up. Pull out cardboard. Caulk the gap. You are done and everything looks perfect.


0

Seems kinda like washing a car....from the top down. Once that NEW pretty tile is on the floor, you will have to protect it for the remainder of the project. Dirty boots, dropped tools, grout drips all will have to be guarded against to avoid damage.


0

The general consensus is that for the purpose of quality, it's best to do the floor first. But, a professional tiler will do the walls first most of the time, so they can get the job done faster. After you do the floor, you can't do the walls until the floor sets.


2

You'd be amazed how easily a bit of heat helps. Try a paint stripping heat gun and treat the tiles as if they were paint. Depends on the adhesive, but it might be the easy way to get them off.


1

I would simply add a layer of grout here and seal it afterward if it were my house. Anything else is going to take a ton of work. Adding a layer of grout and sealing it is one hours work and quite possibly is all you need. Doing anything else probably requires you to remove the tile from the shower, and this is what I would do at someone else's house, ...


15

With these types of tiles you do not want them to break as they are harder to demo when they are in bits and shards. If you try to use a scraper (even power) what inevitably ends up happening is the top of the tile comes off, leaving the much harder to remove bottom on. Also this method severely damages the subfloor, sometimes to the point that you will ...


4

Step one, which I hope you are already doing - put on a pair of safety glasses. You may also want earplugs, and gloves. Use a masonry chisel (nearly parallel to the floor) to get under it and lift it up. You can also drive it into the grout joints, but if you already have a few tiles out, driving under the remaining ones from the area where some are removed ...


1

The tile and grout in an all tile shower are not waterproofing materials but long wearing easy cleaning finish ones. IF your shower was built properly it goes like this from top to bottom... -The tile and grout laid in thin-set tile cement. -A layer of portland cement or thin-set cement -A thick rubber waterproofing membrane -A layer of portland cement ...


1

This is combined problem. Firstly, your grouting material might not be suitable, but what is even bigger problem person who did ceramic tiles work did a poor job; distance between tiles is very, VERY big, and this is the reason why grouting has cracked. You should remove all of the old grouting with some appropriate tool; beware not to damage waterproofing ...


0

Appearance of this crack has nothing to do with foundation; it is something that you can see in many bathrooms. First check if both wall and bathtub are vertical, if they are not this crack will most likely appear from time to time (every year or so).Now, you can do one of two things: You can use silicone to glue it together. Keep in mind that silicone (or ...


0

There was a time when there were no grouting materials and people were using ceramic tiles. Back in those days people have used cement based mortar as a grouting material. Even today for exterior application people use it, because many of them claim that it is still the best grouting material. Also, ceramic tiles weren't always this perfect in shapes and ...


3

I would use sanded grout. You will have to work harder to force the grout into the narrower gaps, but it will fill. It will self strain the sand particles out. Try wiping left-right and diagonally with the grout float pressed very firmly to the tile The admix is a good thing. It makes for better troweling properties, which means it will level better.


0

Thinset and grout is not cheap and easy enough for you? Construction adhesive (giant tube-o-glue) to attach it and caulk for "grout" I suppose. I've had some success with a "short of ripping up the whole floor and doing it over right" repair with construction adhesive to reattach a loose tile on a badly done floor, so it might work well enough. "Mastic" ...


1

Given that it won't be walked on, I'd say spread a very thin layer of thinset, give it 24 hours to set, then just do a regular tile job with thinset and tiles followed by grout. The hardest part of this job will be cutting the rearmost row of tiles so your bullnose is even with the edge.


0

Say hello to joint compound (aka mud); it covers a multitude of sins. Mud it up until it's even with the tile. Start with hot (dry powder, mix with water, sets) mud.


0

I know it's not a permanent solution but for the record, I carefully removed the cracking grout, squirted the cement crack filler between the tiles, worked it under the edge of the tiles with a plastic putty knife, let it set a while, applied a second bead of crack filler in the depth of the opening between tiles, let that set overnight, then grouted. The ...


1

I would not leave a gap, and use screws long enough to reach through the plywood through the backer board. Make sure the flange is well supported or you'll have problems with it down the road if not immediately. Maybe an even better solution would be to have plywood of the right thickness span the gap between the subfloor and the flange, and still use ...


0

1) No, definitely not the best solution. I think the best solution would be tearing out the tiles that surround the niche and re-doing it. 2) I am not familiar with wall tile, but with floor tile, you don't install new tile over old tile (typically) because of concerns of cracking if there's any movement in the subfloor. With your situation, I think the ...


0

I've been laying tile for over 30 years. Yes its always good to do it right the first time, all things being equal that is. Until like I have come across these asbestos seeking rip off lawyers who want you to hire them because of the asbestos in your flooring, whether it be in the linoleum tile or what ever. They want you to sue so and so landlord or ...


0

I have always used a handful of nails around the perimeter, then use screws for most, but I countersink every single hole first.


2

Depending on what is behind your backer you need long roofing nails. I use HB 30-40 times a year and and I use the HB screws and long roofing nails. For shower walls that are a little tough I will double predrill for my backer screws. I will use a small bit for the hole then I will through each hole and use a larger bit. The larger bit I just give a tap ...


1

I'd be inclined to add a few roofing nails in critical locations--corners, edges, etc. The nails mostly provide sheer strength, so it's unlikely that you'll see a problem.


0

You can, of course, do something like this. There are several big caveats: Get a good book on tile setting; there are a lot of nuances and you want to thoroughly read the advice of the pros before going into a project like this With any custom pattern, you need to meticulously plan it; you need to design out the pattern with EXACT measurements so you know ...


0

Measure your tiles, chances are they're not a true 18" anyway. You can cut all four edges of course, but that's a lot of work. Are you able to order more tiles that match what you have? If you can, it's likely that they're available in a 9x18 or 8x16 size. Alternatively you could use a belt sander to smooth the cut edge although it still might look ...


0

Substrate: The size of your new tile will prescribe the size of your trowel. 12" tile usually calls for a quarter inch square notch. That bed of thinset would compress to slightly more than an 1/8". Depending on your troweling skills, you could fudge the height with extra thinset (within specification on the bag) or use a threshold for the transition, as ...



Top 50 recent answers are included