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This is a first time I see such a way to build a subfloor, it's not common in a country of my origin. It seems, however, that concrete blocks are not simply a filler here (as in other types of ceiling/floor structures), they can bear loads and play load-bearing part. That said, I can still think of several reasons to put the concrete layer on top of the ...


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Unfortunately, no. If you read the Wikipedia article on color balance you'll learn that it is actually quite difficult to maintain true color when capturing and displaying digital media. For instance, the article has a pair of renderings of the same image of a lily: The left image is as-shot by a digital camera; the right image is adjusted so that a gray ...


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You don't mention what type of tile you used in this situation. If it is stone or unglazed tile, consider treating the tile with either tile sealer or grout release before grouting. This will make it much easier to remove the remnants of the grout from the surface of the tile.


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Don't use mortar that has lime in it. Use Portland cement: grout. The big difference between concrete, mortar [ignoring lime content] and grout is in their plasticity or fluidity in the initial stage. That is: the constancy to which you mix it; how much water (read the label). The nooks and crannies of porous (e.g., 'coliseum') tile are supposed to ...


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Mix all your grout together while its dry and mix thoroughly. This way all the grout will be the same color, then you can add your water and the correct amount of grout needed. Simply grout the entire floor and allow to dry 20 minutes and then start your sponge and wiping processes. I would highly suggest applying a solvent clear sealer over the grout.


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I removed the tiles, sprayed linoleum with Goo Gone,wiped up Goo Gone. Lineoleum is clean. Quick and easy.



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