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Normally you would get something like the picture below to cover the side of the tile. But it generally has to be installed under tile. (you could still try it out and mud/caulk on the flat end but I don't see it lasting long looking good in a damp area) Now you will have to go with some kind of bullnose or trim piece, much like you would trim out a ...


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Typical requirement for US building codes is l/360 live load deflection limit. So it is not quite accurate to classify this as a correction if the design deflection is l/337. If the finish material requires a stiffer floor, then a structural change is required for aesthetics and or performance, but not for structural safety. Structural modifications will ...


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I had a similar situation where the backer board extended a few inches past my planned tiling edge in my shower. After I had finished with the tile, I taped the joint and applied joint compound over the backer board and it seems great. It's been three years and there is no cracking or any problem with it. That's not exactly an answer but I hope it helps you ...


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Command Strips are definitely worth a shot for attaching the knife rack, and will do absolutely no damage. The large picture hanging strips can hold significant weight, and can be cut to a size that will fit and be hidden. Do make sure to keep the tab in tact so that you can easily remove them when you move out. For $4, 5 minutes, and not risk of damage, it ...


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That is pretty much it except waterproofing. The easiest way to do this is do your plastic**/backerboard first, then drywall, mud/tape/sand/, hit it with waterproof membrane***, then tile last. ** - I don't put plastic behind hardiboard unless I am afraid of water coming in from the other direction. With plastic if backer gets wet you are looking at ...


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If the tiles have a non-porous glaze, an adhesive over a larger contact area should work fine. Adhesive Joint Strength and Surface Area The strength of the adhesive joint is proportional to the area in contact. This is how drywallers hang 100lb sheets of drywall with adhesive and almost no screws: Because of the large area over which the adhesive ...


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There is no Do-It-Yourself asbestos abatement process that meets US construction industry standards for safety and the protection of air quality. The only proper methods for renovating structures containing asbestos bearing building materials require removal and/or encapsulation by professionals experienced in the area. There is no silver bullet in a ...


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Drilling into the tile or grout is your most secure option. To do that, you will need a tile or glass bit. Glass bits are best because in my experience they cut clean holes with minimal jitter. It will work if you want to drill the tile directly or just the grout. Don't push hard though! It is slow drilling, but very effective. If you push hard, you will ...


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It's a huge topic, and not something you can really cover in a single post. Things change based upon the size of the room, the use of the room, the support underneath the floor, the kind of subfloor, the kind of tile, adjacent flooring types, etc. I like the books that Taunton puts out (Tiling complete or working with tile).


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Disclaimer: I am not an expert. I have worked on about a half dozen seperate tile floors, though! These instructions are not meant for a shower wall or floor, just every day use floors like bathroom, kitchen, mudroom, etc. You should also have a decent bit of knowledge on how to use all the tools safely, and a lot of patience/time. This is not as simple as ...


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If I had to install something like that without mechanical fasteners I'd try a product called Lexel. It's silicone based so it's good in wet conditions and sticks to pretty much anything, but it gets harder than traditional silicone so it forms a bond that's scary strong. Having said that, relying solely on an adhesive in an application like this is not ...


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This should not be a problem. Just make sure to leave the cavity open long enough to let the wet spots dry out.


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Tile setters use an abrasive called a "rub stone", but you could probably use a sanding block. After making it as flat as you can, apply a layer of thin-set mortar. Before doing this, read up on techniques for using thin-set.


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I would suggest doing the thresholds first. These are very prominent and you want the things that stand out looking the best. In a doorway if you do threshold first then it is a rectangle fitting doorway. If you do the threshold last, than who knows - this would be up to how square your room is and how well you aligned your tiles. Added: Also when ...


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In terms of the general process it's acceptable to do it threshold(sill plate) first but there may be specifics to the situation that we're not aware of. Contractors are primarily concerned with pushing the project along to keep pace, but occasionally to do that you have to do things out of sequence. An example would be, if the threshold is available but the ...


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Do it the good old fashion, Order a Chinese food, use their free chopstics, cut it smaller and pin them at both ends, tie a string to the stick as straight and leveled line for the tiles. They built castles' floors this way and still look better than modern floors.



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