Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Remove the whole tile, like gbronner suggests, or cut a tiny one to fit. Back-fill the hole with newspaper, or better yet something not flammable, like fiberglass insulation. Thinset the new tile in place and prop it to the wall with a broom or something so it doesn't fall out. Use tile spacers, or tooth picks, to keep it from slumping down. I'd like to hope ...


1

You've got three separate problems: You have a hole in the tile You have a hole in the sheetrock/backer board behind the tile Water may have damaged sheetrock behind other tiles. I'd start by removing the grout around the broken tile with a grout saw, and prying the tile off. Next, I'd take a look at the rest of the wall behind the tile... if it is in ...


1

This simplest tile transition is the integral metal edge. It comes in quite a few profiles, some of which can handle a small amount of elevation change. If you need something more elaborate I'd really need more details and hopefully some pictures.


1

Check your Tile bit to see if you have melted the edge. normally it should feel nice and sharp against your finger. Hopefully you have a nice drill (generally battery operated may be a little on the light side). What I do, is get a straw filled with water, or a spray bottle, and get a helper to either "pipette" or spray water onto the hole while you ...


2

Purchase a 4pc. Ryobi glass and tile bit set which has 1/4 and 5/16 bits. Purchase #10-12 (blue)( 1/4 drill bit) or 14-16 (green)(5/16 drill bit) drywall anchors with screws, enough for how many holes you need to drill. Tape the tile with masking tape where your holes need to be, mark the tape and drill thru the tape. This will keep the drill from walking ...


0

I have used glass bits, which may be the same as a tile bit, with great success. 30-60 seconds per hole. Sometimes the bit would get too hot and melt the solder or brazing that holds the point in place which would then do bad things, that's where dipping the bit in water comes into play. Not letting the bit get to hot is a big issue, whether the point fails ...


0

Given the cost of tile and the value (or cost) of labor, I'd go with ripping it back to the studs and installing a proper tile backer-board (DurockĀ®, Hardi-BackerĀ® or the like) rather than fuss with a dubious substrate. It will be faster than trying to repair the drywall surface and it's a better surface for attaching tile to.


0

Typically, no, if you're using a mortar-based mastic. Proper adhesion depends on the mastic drying in a controlled, relatively slow fashion. Drywall with torn paper is more permeable, and mastic dry times will be inconsistent. However, this doesn't mean you have to rip out the drywall and start from the studs. You can apply a skim coat of drywall compound, ...


0

There are two problems I can think of. The first is exposing the thinset to excess moisture, this will impact the chemical reaction that's part of the curing process, which may lead to a weaker bond and loose tiles. It's easy enough to wait at least 24 hours and then check the tiles to see if they are firmly in place. If a bunch are easily dislodged, then ...


1

I would use an external grade ply, seal underside and edges with acrylic primer and stick the tiles with an adhesive suitable for glass mosaic.


2

How thick is the plywood? If you're talking about bolting through the plywood into the entertainment center, why not use screws from the entertainment center out into the plywood. That way you would come from the back of the plywood and not disturb the front. Depending on how the entertainment center is configured, it may be possible to use a recessed ...


2

Take a look at a French cleat, it will help keep the ply level and supported and will allow you to remove whenever you wanted provided you can lift the plywood off the back. The two factors here, one are getting the cleat affixed to the ply and the entertainment back, ideally both have enough depth for wood screws. The second is the gap between the ply ...


0

I had glazed porcelain tiles put in "cheaply"and there were a couple bucket marks left that drove me crazy. I had no idea what they were from and didn't trust that the tile layer hadn't ruined them. I tried DUPONT haze remover, CRUD CUTTER, vinegar and baking soda (which worked partly), but then while cleaning something else with a Magic Eraser I tried it on ...


4

You could do either: level the floor or level the individual parts (shower enclosure, vanity, toilet) Which you choose will depend on the degree of out-of-level Self Leveler: self leveler does not need to stay intact after the backer board install. It can fracture and still completely support the backer board.. its got nowhere to go and it doesn't ...


0

You don't tape the edges. Not on walls or tub. I'm not sure about a 1/4 inch gap by tub (probably would do 1/8 there) be everywhere else is fine. Nothing goes in the gap. Gap will be covered by either tile on the wall or baseboard. Also make sure you are using the right mesh "tape". Your cement board gets same thinset as your tile .


0

Tape the seams if your going to use pro-red or its equivalent (highly suggested). If the manufacture says to leave an expansion gap, that's what you do; leave a gap. I must admit, that where it meets the walls, I wouldn't. Any expansion would buckle the tape and bubble the paint. I'd rather the whole wall shift a little. Also, the only place for caulk in a ...


0

The cement board must be properly backed at tub edge to keep it stiff. The gap between it and the tub is grout filled. I don't tape corners. I do tape bevels simply to make a flush surface for the tiles. I generally silicon tiled corners. I use 1/8 inch gap and that give me more room for silicon on the corners. That's enough room. The idea is to avoid ...


0

If you don't have an issue about the door being centered, you can use the clips and "studs" of the pocket door kit on one side and use the 2X4s on the or ripped to size to allow you to do what you need on the other side. Here is a couple of sketches I made a while back showing the method of construction for a pocket door in a 2X6 wall. This way of doing this ...


0

3/16" is an awfully fine clearance for a pocket door. Unless the door is moisture-proof, the door is going to bow (and therefore jam when moved) whenever there is a humidity difference across it such as when there is a shower in use. That is a completely unacceptable place to run plumbing. Heck, getting 3/4 inch galvanized pipe crossing each other inside ...



Top 50 recent answers are included