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I am a certified technician with DSapone.com and we waterproof tile, stone, grout and just about every other surface with a product called Celine. It's a true waterproofing sealer that is crystal clear and is a solvent base. You can found this product and more at www.pFOkUS.com.


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In some areas, you can get away without having grout, but the tiles will be more susceptible to damage because grout (or something) adds strength to the floor (and keeps the tiles in place). You may have seen or heard about how some people make really tight fittings with beveled tile, and they don't use grout. This is more for areas that are onramental or ...


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Movement is the enemy of masonry of any type. In this case, it depends on a few factors. How much movement? How often does the movement occur? What products were used to install the tile? What size and type of tile? If all you're asking is whether some cracking is likely to occur, the answer is yes. However, it may be negligible from an aesthetic ...


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I would acid etch the old cement with a strong muriatic acid solution to clean and make the surface rough. Then add a adhesive promoter like Moos milk painted on the slab that will help the cement bond and reduce cracking. I have done this on floors as thin as 3/4" and as thick as 2" with good results. With a thin slab a fine aggregate like 1/4" will also ...


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When you're building a tub/shower surround, there are two questions that need to be answered: Which substrate material should I choose? How do I waterproof it? The answer to question #1 is easy. Cementboard, always (unless you're using a fully-integrated system like Kerdi, but if that's the case, you're probably not asking the question here). Not ...


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drywall should never be used where its in contact with water regularly. if its some splash or moisture occasionally, you can use water resistant drywall. we are already starting to see problems with various waterproof membrane systems they have introduced in the last few years. redgard is just the newest crappy product they are trying to get people to ...


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My problem was fridge rolling back over time and hitting wall. Tried wooden rods, wedges, etc. but they just slid on the tile. Think I've solved problem by getting a rubber cord protector (what you use when you have an extension cord that needs to go across an aisle). Cut to size and wedged under front wheels of fridge. So far so good, rubber doesn't slide ...


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I just finished my kitchen backsplash using a Dremel with a diamond blade($18). It helped for me to have tape next to the cut. Advise using respirator and safety glasses.


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J-B Weld, LePage's Metal Epoxy should work as well.


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Like you stated: masonry bladed saw set to cut just above or below the concrete base. If you snap lines to show a 2 foot x 2 foot quadrant to cut with the saw will make it much easier to remove concrete. You will need to expose the sub-floor to begin so that a pinch bar or long pry bar can be slid under each section and fulcrumed up. Have several abrasive ...



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