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I wouldn't use hardibacker outside; I'd use a cementitious (durock etc.) instead. And then I'd use a waterproofer/isolation membrane like Ditra. This will not only waterproof things, it will also provide some isolation against movement and cracking.


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You should always use a waterproof barrier between cementitious tile board and wood in wet applications. Tile grout and hardibacker and wonderboard and concrete and any other cement based material is porous and water will eventually penetrate. For your application a "cold applied" black waterproofer (in lieu of the normal hot-mop asphalt) could be used, you ...


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This is a tough one. Very odd to have that "cube" adjacent to the tub with a cabinet so close. The cabinet should have been pushed up against the tub and the cube/cabinet gap bridged, waterproofed, and tiled, so there would be no gap. If the problem were just aesthetic I would say use some porcelain repair, it comes in a bottle with a paintbrush type ...


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The short answer is no, not without removing the grout that has already been applied, and that is a truly miserable exercise. The link in the comment from Niall is your best bet. Sealer/stain.


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There is no reason to use pressure treated wood if it is under both HB and tile. It won't see moisture and PT wood warps more as it looses moisture. You could also Redgard your HB before tiling. Also HB is not supposed to be used outside according to manufacturer. Would I use it outside in your situation. Yes. But just throwing that out there.


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The wood should be pressure-treated or naturally rot-resistant. Sealing the surface may reduce warpage, but will have limited effect on long-term rot issues.


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It depends on the concrete permeability and the tile permeability (is it porcelain (essentially zero permeability) or a ceramic bisque (most non-porcelain tiles))? A sealed concrete floor and a porcelain tile will greatly extend the cure cycle by limiting moisture migration. It is for this reason that Schluter (a tile membrane manufacturer) specifies a ...


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You will only need the backer board for your entry way. No other waterproofing needed. If it was your bathroom at the shower entrance, it would be a good idea, but since it will only be an occasional wetting from tracking in water or snow, and porcelain tile is impervious, it will handle it very well. You should seal your grout joints too, so the color ...


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Yes there is a rapid set thinset, big box stores have it. Fortified thinset that you have is good stuff, I used it in all my install for my bath renovations. 2 days time is not enough time for thinset to get a strong bond, enough to step on but easy to pull, any longer you would have had a tougher time. The amount of thinset you use is crucial, it has to be ...



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