Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Depending on the condition of your concrete patio, I would use something like LevelQuik to make sure the concrete surface is nice and level before putting those tiles down. Concrete patios often have slight dips/rises that are hard to see, but most hard tiles are very unforgiving with variances like that. After leveling you want to put an isolation barrier ...


1

I can see the ridges left by the installers notched trowel. Look at the back of any loose tiles. It should have thinset on at least 80% of it's back. I'm guessing the thinset wasn't mixed correctly. If it is to dry the tile does not get pressed into the notched adhesive so as to form a mechanical bond. You can check if the tiles are affixed properly by ...


0

The glue used by the floor covering industry to adhere carpet to a floor is one of the most tenacious, and laborious bonds to break. If you want to burn some calories grab some knee pads and a 6 inch floor scraper (and some extra blades). Use a sweeping arch to slice the residual adhesive from the floor. Or, if possible, rent a 17 inch floor scrubber/buffer ...


0

You did hear correctly: the floor must be as flat as possible (and as rigid) in order to support the tile. You mentioned the floor being supported on posts. If there is enough head room a better repair is to shim-up the low spot from below. Depending on how severe the floor depression is this may entail hammering some store bought shims under the joists or ...


-1

The concrete board and extra mud will be all you need. Lay the concrete board, then fill in where needed.


0

To re-secure ceramic tiles it is best to consider what environment it will be subject to. If, for example, I am re-attaching a loose wall tile in a shower stall I wouldn't use a "mastic" type adhesive. I've seen repairs fail when mastic gets wet. For shower stalls with a solid backing go with any fortified thin set mix. Some people have claimed construction ...


1

Can you do it: yes. Will it come back to bite you: probably yes. Trapping wood between two cement building layers, in my opinion is asking for problems. If there is any moisture wicking through that cement slab it will be trapped beneath your tile in the wood - Do the work and scrape that floor. I have spent days scraping a floor to prep for tile ...


0

Is there a particular reason why you want to do this? Technically it shouldn't be a problem (as long as what you put over it is water-proofed correctly) but I wouldn't do it unless I had a clear reason to do so. Also, the other comment I see mentions plastic under the Hardiebacker (which is perfectly fine) or Redguard over the Hardibacker (which is also ...


0

I would install tile and all granite and marble with no grout lines at all. I can’t do it. Even though it will look better initially, eventually it will ruin the tile. The best thing to do is use the smallest grout line your particular tile will allow and get a grout that closely matches the tile.


1

Yes! This is actually a very common install method. I do drywall, plastic, then hardieboard on nearly half my tub shower surrounds. It is easier to work with 1/4" HB and I get flatter walls. You could make a point that this type of install is the most effective and long term in a lot of cases. For a stand-up shower I would however put something like ...


1

The approach is usually progressive. You try a less aggressive cleaner to see if it works, and if not, then move on to a more aggressive. At some point, you may find that the cleaner damages the surface, so test in an inconspicuous area. I would use paper towels and a mild scrubbing pad, and I would use cleaners in the following order: a soap based ...


0

If your renting, your only concern, I would think, is the smell. If there is a smell it will disappear as soon as the water dries up. When I fixed my mothers house the smell was supposedly there for years. It was caused by a slowly leaking toilet. When it was fixed, it took some weeks for the floor to completely dry, and the smell went away. You may have ...


0

Leaving this as an answer with trepidation and the hope that a real tile expert will chime in. My guess is that they're limestone or travertine. If you have spares, grind/smash/pulverize them to dust, mix that with a 2 part epoxy and fill 'er up. (Same for the broken chips at the door -- glue them solidly down with granite-safe adhesive and fill the cracks ...


1

If you have a specific tile in mind, and you have seen this in a store, simply try the slipperyness out by making it wet and rubbing on it. There should be nothing wrong with using a pool tile for a bathroom (except maybe slipperyness), since a bathroom is made waterproof underneath the tiles. If the membrane is intact, you can use any tile meant for wet ...


1

I agree with keshlam. All you need to do is screw it down. On a normal tile install you seal the the subfloor and screw down the backer-board so this would be no different, the linoleum is just sandwiched between the sub and the hardy. The only down fall is you cant really seal it.


0

I don't think adhesive would be needed or helpful; what's really holding the backerboard in place are the screws into the subfloor. The linoleum gets buried and becomes mostly irrelevant.



Top 50 recent answers are included