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16

Yes, but not just for rigidity. Cement board is made of, well, cement - and cement is brittle. When you screw the cement board in you create a pressure point or stress point. Even though the board is screwed in with lots and lots of screws, each screw hole is a stress point prone to breakage. By gluing the board as well as screwing, you ensure that a ...


13

When I used to do a lot of these for a building/renovation company, the approach our foreman recommended was to assume the drywall will need replacing anyway and just rip it out. That would let you remove that entire panel in 45 minutes, and then you can just pop a new piece of drywall in, which is another 15 minutes. As you can see from your 45 minutes, ...


12

Anything rigid you put over a flimsy structure will be destroyed over time because it won't have the support it needs. Most tiles (except plastic/vinyl) don't handle bending well. Self leveling compound doesn't add rigidity, it just makes a smooth top surface. You need to fix the structure first. That means going down before you go up.


12

Easiest: Easy: A rotary tool (e.g. Dremel) with a grout removal bit: Also Easy: An oscillating multi-tool with a grout bit: Least easy: A grout saw: Downright Painful: Dr. Pickems approach:


11

Greenboard is water resistant, but should not be used in areas that are going to stay damp, such as tub surrounds. Once water gets into it (especially if it's not sealed correctly, and there's not the requisite gap between the tub and the wallboard), it will slowly deteriorate and/or mold -- it's water resistant, not water proof. Yes, cement board is a ...


11

I wouldn't be too concerned unless there's mortar that is raised above the level of the grout - which you've already said there isn't. Scraping the higher sections to give a reasonable depth of grout would be as far as I'd go. A lot of adhesives these days are sold as tile cement and grout, though they do tend to be coarser than "pure" grout, so they are ...


11

Most refrigerators have adjustable feet that can be "unscrewed" in order to level the fridge. All you need to do is "unscrew" these feet until the wheels are slightly off the floor.


11

Color This is the easy one. If you're going to use dark grout, you can use grey thin-set. If your grout is a light color, or you're installing glass tile or a porous stone, use white thin-set. If you use grey thin-set with light grout, glass, or porous stone, the color may show through. To modify, or not to modify In most cases, you'll want to use some ...


10

There are several things to consider. Unsanded grout (used with 1/8" tile spacing and less) is not as strong as the more commonly used sanded grouts. Given that fact, and the fact that the joints are narrower (making the grout more difficult to force into the joints), it going to more important to have the joints as free of excess mortar as possible. ...


10

If there's a door, under the door, directly. Otherwise, either dead center or even with one edge or the other. If there's no door, I'd say bring the carpet up to the edge of the tile, rather than cutting the tile to meet in the middle. That said - it's a purely aesthetic choice.


10

Mosaic stone tile is supposed to be installed still attached to its mesh backing. Otherwise it would be more efficient to go to a landscaping company and buy a truckload of river rock. From what I can tell, there could be two causes for the 'line' effect you ended up with: The mesh squares were poorly designed/manufactured with all the stones lining up to ...


9

If the floor is concrete the best thing todo is scorch the uneven floor with a grinder making deep grooves in various directions. Clean with water jetting loose dust away. Mix some new concrete. Wet the floor again and screte it to a level But dont make it smooth just leave it slightly rough maintaing the level. Pour water on as per concrete bag reccomebds. ...


9

In your situation, I'd use reducer molding instead of T molding:


9

You normally want to leave the stones on the backing as they are much easier to handle and lay like this. I think this is a case where the sheets haven't been installed as well as they could be - if you look at the bottom of your photo the joins here are a lot less noticeable. I'd say that the tiler has simply left too much gap between each sheet. You can ...


9

Will it be used as a shower as well? If so, sheetrock is the wrong material for the surround. It's going to act as a sponge if water ever finds its way to it. What you could do is put backer board on top of the sheetrock, then coat the backer board with a waterproof membrane (I like the Redgard product for that) then tile. Be sure that the backer overlaps ...


9

You want to look for pieces called hardwood flooring transitions. They can either be "T" pieces, reducers, or threshold pieces. Here are some examples:


8

There is a dremel tool called the multi-max that I have used before. You can get a diamond attachment for it that will cut through grout like butter. Once you get the grout out you should be able pop up the tile and replace it.


8

Here are some good points against using plywood, the source is talking about tiling a floor but most of the points are valid for walls as well. In my opinion it's better to go the "overkill" route, then have to redo the job in the future because something didn't turn out right. The cost difference between plywood and cement board is negligible, so your not ...


8

You can lay tiles on an unlevel floor (consider outdoor locations where you need water to run away from the home). What you shouldn't do is lay tiles on an uneven, settling, or unstable floor. Edit: As Tester101 said, you're both right, my point above was the same "unlevel != uneven" comment. If the problem is an uneven floor, then cement leveling is the ...


8

Use a laser level to project a level line across the wall. Something like this is self leveling. This won't work if you need to line them up to a non-level reference. In that case you can use a simple laser line (which is much cheaper than the self leveling models).


7

You'll want to install carpet to tile transition strips (sometimes known as edge trim). Here is a listing from home depot. Basically it's a decorative metal strip that goes over the carpet/tile gap and provides a nice, attractive transition between the two. Here are some instructions from eHow on how to install the transition.


7

I'd grind/scrape away the grout first and then gently tap the middle of the tile with a screwdriver until it shatters and chip it out. It'll probably take a while to do it but you should be able to scrape/chip away the old thinset, apply new thinset then regrout. best of luck !


7

Use a masonary bit (easier to get hold of) Put a cross of masking tape on the tile to stop the bit slipping sideways when you start Go easy, don't put too much pressure on the bit. Tip: try on an old bit of broken tile ( or a broken mug/teacup from goodwill) before starting on the expensive tiles.


7

Smaller tiles are less likely to crack on the tile itself, the joints will give first. But larger tiles are stronger in general. That said, you should work on increasing the strength of your floor before tiling if you are concerned about cracking. If you can access the joists, sister any weak places between two load bearing points. On the floor itself, ...


7

Tile is generally installed as a permanent fixture. Removal is intended to be difficult - in fact easy removal is a clear indicator that the installation wasn't done well. The sub-material is often destroyed in the removal process because of the force necessary for removal of the product. DITRA, being textured, would hold onto the mortar used to mount the ...


7

The pink stuff is a bacterial biofilm. Cleaning agents containing bleach work well to kill the stuff.


7

Talk to your installer about selectively removing a few stones here and there along the gridlines, and replacing them with different sizes & shapes to break up the lines. This will go a long way toward fixing your problem and should be a lot more palatable to the installer than a complete do-over. For what it's worth I don't think it's unreasonable to ...


7

It looks like all that is seperating the drywall from the tile is a bead of caulking. To fix this, I would first remove all of the existing caulking. Then I would cut out the area of the affected drywall and patch in a new piece, using the factory taped edge as the end that butts up against the tile. Tape, mud and sand the new section and paint to match. ...



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