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This is my attempt to "demystify" the whole "C" wire thing for non-technical folks. This explanation intentionally ignores lots of details that are not relevant to a basic understanding of the concept. An old-timey thermostat is mechanical in nature. You can think of it very much like 3 separate mechanical on/off switches. (the "switches" in this case are ...


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The C wire is the common wire...ground wire. You already have 24v ac going to the red wire. If you have an extra wire connect it to the C at the thermostat and ground it at the transformer box in the AC unit. To check, just put a voltmeter and put the red lead on the R and the black lead on the C. You should get 24 to 29 VAC. There should be no voltage on ...


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Test the thermostat There's a couple ways to do this, the "professional" way, or the "caveman" way. Label and remove the wire connected to the Y terminal on the thermostat. Set your multimeter to test continuity, or resistance. Set the thermostat to cooling, and reduce the set temperature until the unit starts to call for cooling (may hear a click, and ...


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Yes, the wires you describe are sufficient for an auto-changeover thermostat. In fact, The Honeywell T8602D series already includes both an AUTO fan setting and an AUTO changeover setting. See page 7 of the manual posted on the Honeywell website: https://customer.honeywell.com/resources/techlit/TechLitDocuments/68-0000s/68-0164.pdf


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The best I can do on this is give a narrow set of guidelines: If a system was working and then there is a failure, usually there is only one critical point of failure that prevents the system from operating and not multiple simultaneous failures. (Of course, there may be multiple underlying problems that are not system critical, but that is not the issue ...


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You'll need a transformer to step down mains voltage, to 24 volts that the thermostat can use. And you'll need a relay that can work with 24 volts. You'll wire it up something like this. When the thermostat calls for heat, the relay contact will be pulled closed. This will signal the fireplace to turn on. NOTE: the three contacts used on the ...


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A) Transformer. B) Relay or electronic relay, 24V in switching whatever on the output side.


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Since the AC is kicking on, the problem isn't there. Thermostat is just a simple signalling circuit. Since you have to shake seems to suggest something is wrong with the thermostat. Some of the old thermostats have a glass bulb with a bead of mercury mounted on the end of a bi-metal string. As the metals expand, the bulb will tilt allowing the mercury to ...


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Your photo shows a heat pump thermostat with control for 1 stage of auxiliary heat which is also used as emergency heat if the heat pump completely fails and emergency mode is selected on the thermostat (that's why W and E are wired together). From your description you have a heat pump which may not have any working auxiliary heat and your orange wire ...


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Connect the green wire to the G terminal in the furnace, and the other end of that wire to the G terminal on the thermostat. Connect one of the black wires to the W terminal in the furnace, with the other end of the wire connected to the W terminal on the thermostat. Then connect one of the red wires to the R terminal in the furnace, and the other end to the ...


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Switching the wire from W to G on both the thermostat and controller board allowed me to use the fan in the summer while disabling the heating call (W). For the winter I'll switch it back since it's a heat-only unit. Otherwise an extra wire from G(thermostat) -> G(controller) would have been needed.



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