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Typically O, and/or B are used to control a reversing valve in the heat pump. Depending on which is energized, the system either provides heating or cooling. You'd have to check the manual for the specific thermostat you'd like to install, but usually thermostats can be configured to work with heat pumps. You might have to move a few jumpers around in the ...


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The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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Colors of the wires is misleading, in reality there are but 2 sides or legs of 24 volt power, The "Hot leg" Red, and the "Neutral leg" Common. Common is called this because every 24 volt circuit terminates upon it to complete its circuit.


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The Common leg of the 24 volt power supply is where all the 24 volt circuits terminate to complete their circuit.


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The Nest says Common need not be wired up usually, however it often is required to work correctly and charge the stat up.


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The below are all you have to worry about, Yellow need not be wired to Y at the air handler as it is a dummy trminal for convenience, many simply run Y from the stat to the AC unit outside bypassing the Y terminal on the air handler.


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See below, if you jumper Yellow to White the heat strips will run in both cool and heat as Yellow is energized in both modes, what makes it a cooler or heater is the O being energized in cool mode Rheems use the B terminals to be energized in heat.


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The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...


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You will wire the cooling transformer to RC and the heat transformer to RH


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You moved the Green to C on one end but the picture with the transformer in the top left shows Green still on G there it should be on C. The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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Go to the transformer and see what wire is common, it will be opposite of RED going to the thermostat on R or Red. Common is the side of 24 v power that every 24 v circuit terminates upon to complete its path. You will read 24 volts across every wire with Red , only with a call for heat will white not read 24 volts to red from white as the switch between ...


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You should check the wiring in the furnace. There are no standards for thermostat wire colors, so you can't always trust the color of the wires. Seeing how the wires connect to the furnace, is a sure fire way to figure out what's what. The O (cool mode) and B (heat mode) terminals are usually used for a reversing valve, in heat pump systems. I'm not ...


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It sounds like you are lucky to have extra wires not connected on either the thermostat side and the HVAC side. The real question is: What voltage is the thermostat looking for at the "C" terminal? I assume it needs to be always on so you can either connect the blue wire to the "C" terminal on the thermostat and the other end of the blue wire to the positive ...


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Is there a small switch somewhere n the thermostat that says something like "fan" and has positions for "auto" and "on"? Is it in the "On" position? If what you mean is that the fan keeps blowing when the thermostat is not calling for cooling (but the air at that point is not being cooled) that could be it. Otherwise, look for a short circuit in the ...



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