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Typically yes, but without knowing the furnace and equipment you have (ie: central air?) it's hard to say for certain. There should be a wiring diagram somewhere in the unit. Here is a generic diagram, again, without knowing your exact unit this is just for reference.


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The device labeled "PS-802 ELWCO", is a low water cut-off. The "C" terminal there, is not the C you're looking for. I believe the white wire from the transformer, is what you'll want to connect your C wire to. I'm not 100% confident though, since I'm not that familiar with this system. You may be able to contact the manufacturer for confirmation.


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It's labeled in the diagram. You should see a cable that leads to the A/C compressor,which contains 2 wires. One will be connected to the Y wire from the thermostat, the other is connected to the C wire. You didn't include the make and model of the furnace, so I'm not sure if there's a terminal block or if the terminals are labeled. You'll want to make ...


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As the furnace wiring diagram shows, it is the "neutralish" side of the secondary of the 24 VAC transformer. It is marked "brown" on the diagram and goes to a round doohickey (probably a small motor). Many HVAC technicians aren't very flexible on wire colors so to avoid future hassle, mark the blue wire you commandeer as C or color it brown with a brown ...


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It looks like you're out of luck. It appears that the transformer is inside the hydrostat, and it doesn't expose a C terminal. You could contact the manufacturer, and ask them if there's a workaround. Based on the documentation, there's no obvious way to connect a WiFi thermostat to the system.


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You could tandem a thermostat upstairs, but you will always be wasting heat downstairs. The proper solution is two furnaces or space heaters upstairs. I have a separate zone upstairs with a thermostat, but because we mostly only use one room up there I heat that room with a space heater.


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I would recommend first contacting a home energy efficiency company first rather than an HVAC company. HVAC guys are usually clueless about systemic problems like these and will usually try to sell you a larger unit without diagnosing the true cause of the issue (which is a pain in the neck and can probably be fixed for much less than the cost of new ...


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If you're not going to do the work yourself, you could contact any local Heating & Air Conditioning company (HVAC). They will be able to find and repair any problems with the system. As for zoning, it's definitely possible. How easily it can be done; and to what degree, completely depends on your house, and how willing you are to potentially open up ...


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Does the ratio of static pressures between two stories differ at different blower speeds? That's a very interesting question, but I believe it's a moot point. Any dramatic difference would mean your system isn't balanced correctly in the first place. (needs zoning, split systems, or an actual balancing) Stack effect will cause plenty of heat to go upstairs, ...


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This is not normal. When the thermostat energizes the G terminal, only the blower fan should come on. Check for a jumper/short between Y and G either at the thermostat, or the air handler.


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You will not be able to get a "wire powered" thermostat, without at least one more wire. You'll need an additional wire, to connect to the C terminal of the new thermostat.



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