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1

Well, you guys are absolutely brilliant. The problem is nearly fixed. I had comEd come out do just what you said. It turns out that one of the phases coming into the house is bad! So everyone was spot on...the AC was operating at 120 and feeding the rest of the house when it was "on". Half the panel was out because of the bad phase. The "boys in red" at ...


2

I sounds like the problem might be that the right side of your service panel either isn't connected to the main at all or has a really bad connection. I'm guessing what is happening is that when the A/C is "on", it is back feeding the right side of your panel through the breaker. This could also explain why your A/C compressor isn't working - it would be ...


3

Which country, Michael? USA, by any chance, judging from your jargon? If so... I think you may have a grounding issue at the panel or at the line coming in from the pole. I've seen similar issues, and issues with lights burning EXTREMELY brightly for a short while before they burn out, from just such grounding issues. Especially if the AC and the 1st-floor ...


0

After looking closely at the images you've supplied, this is what it appears is going on in the last photo. From what I know about HVAC systems, I would guess a broader view of the system would look something like this. The transformer supplies power to the thermostat through the RED wire. The BLUE wire serves as the COOL call from the thermostat. The ...


1

The C wire, not to be confused with R or RC is the return path. Think of it as a ground, though technically not. Based on the information above, none of the wires O, B, W, G, R, Y, will work for C. So they can not be jumped over to the C connection. The C wire, usually the brown wire on the transformer, the low voltage (24v) is the common. However, no ...


2

The answer is yes; it was a problem. The wiring wasn't done correctly. I had an HVAC guy come out. He suspected that whoever installed my thermostat cheated by using some lower grade wire and doubling them up. Sure enough when he untwisted the wires from the old thermostat and checked the voltage with a multimeter we saw that the pair would give us the ...


0

Typically O, and/or B are used to control a reversing valve in the heat pump. Depending on which is energized, the system either provides heating or cooling. You'd have to check the manual for the specific thermostat you'd like to install, but usually thermostats can be configured to work with heat pumps. You might have to move a few jumpers around in the ...


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The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


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Colors of the wires is misleading, in reality there are but 2 sides or legs of 24 volt power, The "Hot leg" Red, and the "Neutral leg" Common. Common is called this because every 24 volt circuit terminates upon it to complete its circuit.


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The Common leg of the 24 volt power supply is where all the 24 volt circuits terminate to complete their circuit.


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The Nest says Common need not be wired up usually, however it often is required to work correctly and charge the stat up.


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The below are all you have to worry about, Yellow need not be wired to Y at the air handler as it is a dummy trminal for convenience, many simply run Y from the stat to the AC unit outside bypassing the Y terminal on the air handler.


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See below, if you jumper Yellow to White the heat strips will run in both cool and heat as Yellow is energized in both modes, what makes it a cooler or heater is the O being energized in cool mode Rheems use the B terminals to be energized in heat.


1

The YELLOW or Y terminal at the furncae/ air handler is a dummy terminal for convenience, it is not required to be used, you could send Yellow directly to the AC unit out doors. Common will be used since the Common leg of power comes from the transformer which is in the furnace. The Yellow going to common likely if you trace it back it in fact is ...


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You will wire the cooling transformer to RC and the heat transformer to RH


1

You moved the Green to C on one end but the picture with the transformer in the top left shows Green still on G there it should be on C. The picture below you would pull the green wire off of Green at both the stat and furnace and move it to C/Common, then you jumper Yellow to Green at the furnace.


0

Go to the transformer and see what wire is common, it will be opposite of RED going to the thermostat on R or Red. Common is the side of 24 v power that every 24 v circuit terminates upon to complete its path. You will read 24 volts across every wire with Red , only with a call for heat will white not read 24 volts to red from white as the switch between ...



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