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9

I never tape anything and people are amazed at the crisp lines I paint in my home. I use a high quality angled brush for this. Depending on my wrist fatigue and room, I work from either left to right, or vice versa with this technique. This is self-taught and I have no idea if their is a name for this. I load the brush up with plenty of paint and then ...


6

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very ...


5

The point of Green Glue is to create a flexible layer of never fully firm glue between layers of drywall, right? To absorb sound? In which case, I think you'll need to first level the ceiling, then apply green glue, then apply your final layer. Otherwise, if you green glue over top of the texture, you'll have high points in the texture that touch the new ...


5

Since you should paint over any texture you apply, combine the two into one step and use a texture paint such as popcorn or sand, both available from Home Depot (similar products are available at other stores). Alternatively, if you already have some paint, mix your own using a texture additive:


4

I have spent a great deal of time scrapping popcorn off ceilings. I don't know if that is the type of coating you are planning on, but I would tend to leave the ceilings smooth. I think that looks better. Textures ceilings were big in the 70's and 80's, but not so much now. Sorry, not an answer, just my opinion.


4

Preparation: definitely use a drop cloth. Because it's a wet job, I'd also recommend a putting down a layer of painter's plastic on top of the drop cloth. This will catch most of the splatter and makes clean-up a lot easier -- simply roll up the plastic. I believe the texture compound has some adhesive properties, so as long as the walls are clean, it'll ...


4

Like Karl, I just riped the drywall out completely rather than trying to fix it in my own home. But if you go the pole sander route, then I'd measure out where the non-beveled joints are going to go (the 4' side of a 4x8 sheet) and just sand those areas, maybe 6" to either side of the joint. The drywall will bend in slightly at the joint and you fill the ...


3

No - It will never match the original pattern. But we had similar issues in many apartments where we couldn't just leave a bold spot. So we had to re do that "area" area being keyword here. Afterwards apply some undercoats to the area that was redone (we did ours with a concrete mix but some have silicone or other types) Only you will see exactly where ...


3

You should prime it first. Primer is essential to get good adhesion and coverage. If you're really trying to avoid applying two coats, the next best thing would be a paint + primer combo.


3

Scraping then taping will work. Re-blending the new and old textures invisibly is nearly impossible. Consider replacing 3 to 4ft instead of 12" and adding a wainscot or just a chair rail and leave the bottom smooth.


3

That is in fact a "sand finish", your intuition was right. Now depending on the age of the house it could be sand added to the plaster, added to the mud, or a "sand finish" paint. The last is your best hope of matching, as you would drywall it all smooth then simply use brushstrokes to recreate the pattern. There are premixed sand paints amazingly ...


3

I have the same thing. We used two methods: 1st we used a sander to lower the high points of the texture, this is something you want to use as last resort. After the sanding was finished I did a skim coat, then had to sand again to smooth the skim coat. Super labor intensive. The next room I just put up 3/8 drywall, took half the time. It seems more ...


3

It's not something you need to remove. However, how thick is the drywall that you're putting up? If it's 1/2 or 5/8", ok, but I'd be worried about how much weight you're adding. If you're putting up 3/8 or if you managed to find some 1/4", you're going to show every bump and ridge beneath it. You probably want to use half inch, and you might think about ...


3

I would remove it, then your drywall sandwich has no gaps between it and will allow for better attachment. But its not popcorn so it may not be as simple as a scrape with a trowel. If it is really a bear to take off, you could try a test piece without removing it and see how it looks and attaches. If the next ceiling is smooth, I would be somewhat ...


3

Most stucco/plaster patterns/textures aren't/weren't created by any particular tools but rather by incredibly highly skilled craftsmen. In other words, the pattern was created via decades of experience and skills rather than a particular tool. We have a stucco house and over the years I've talked to a few contractors and they all said the same thing...good ...


3

Here is a good article that sounds easy and fairly cheap (you can get a 5 gal bucket of compound for about $15). Method One: The Roller Sheetrock Texturing Method This is the easiest of the two wall and ceiling texturing methods outlined in this tutorial. You’ll need: Paint roller handle with cover and extension pole Paint roller pan ...


2

Thanks for the feedback guys. We ended up going with the textured ceilings anyways (partially to hide some minor imperfections too. Here's what I learned: What type of consistency should the topping mud be? Runny? Thick? This varies depending on the type of texture you're try for. More "subtle" textures like Orange Peel require thinner mud topping. For ...


2

+1 on Elf's brush technique. I would add: using a small scraper or careful use of a partially exposed utility knife, to remove the texture just on either side of the inside corner. Then I would deliberately overpaint the ceiling paint onto to wall a bit (1" or so). Then go back with EvilElfs loaded brush and cut towards the ceiling. The overpainted ...


2

As with many textures, it is likely formed from water-soluble base like drywall topcoat. If so, spray it with water from a spray bottle until you think it's saturated enough then take a wide drywall knife and see if you ca scrape it off. If this works, you'll need to tape and re-texture afterwards. Alternatively, a drywaller can skimcoat over the top of it, ...


2

It sounds like you have a mud swirl pattern on your ceiling. These can be difficult to match an existing pattern to a repair. Practice matching the pattern on scrap pieces of drywall by changing the consistency of the mix (thicker or looser) as well as how the mix applied until the pattern is replicated. Practice will enable a good match when it comes ...


2

Either apply a skim coat (or 2 or 3) where you smooth the entire surface... Tedious but it will work - use the widest blade you can and do each coat perpendicular to the last. or... add a new layer of 1/8" drywall over the existing and mud/tape the seams.


2

Spray and roll, more commonly called spray and backroll around me is when you spray the paint on and then another person follows behind you with a roller to roll the freshly spread paint. One of the reasons to do it is to get more even coverage in textured ceilings. It's easier to do with two people so if it's just you might just want to skip the sprayer to ...


1

If you are like me & don't have a straight hand to save your sole here are a few tips that may be helpfull. The first method is to tape along the ceiling and with using the exact color you used to paint your ceiling, apply a thin coat along the tape line between your wall & ceiling (this acts as a barrier & will not allow your new wall color to ...


1

We're in the process of painting our main floor (and we opted in for the cheaper popcorn ceilings when we bought the house), so I feel your pain. I mostly use Elf's technique: use a good quality angle brush, unload around a half-inch below the ceiling and then push paint up into the corner. As a part of prep-work, I use a 1/4" screwdriver and drag it along ...


1

Priming then painting: The texture is water based, so you need to prime first with oil or shellac based primer. This will seal the texture and "waterproof" it. Use plenty of ventilation and possibly an organic respirator. Once primed, any paint can be used (make sure the full drying interval is used). Removing: will work before any painting. Put down ...


1

I was going to say "At least its not popcorn"!. You can also get a drywall sander that hooks up to a shop-vac to cut down on dust. I think I would do what Matthew suggests and see if it can be knocked down some with a scraper first. I would try a wall paper scraper, which I call a "razor blade on a stick". You can wet it to keep down dust, but I doubt it ...


1

I would leave it flat. That's the whole idea of scraping off popcorn. In almost ever home remodel show, they want to remove the popcorn.


1

You should. Something is needed to seal the new drywall. Primer is much cheaper than paint. The basic rule is if you want a wall to look uniform, you have to prime it first. If this is a paint + texture can, when left unprimed, the drywall will suck all the paint from the texture into the wall, leaving an uneven mess behind. If you're going to paint ...


1

This kind of textured coatingis generally known as Artex in the UK (Wikipedia link.). Take great care if you set to it with a sander as other answers have suggested, as old Artex can contain asbestos. The two ways I've dealt with it previously have been to either skim over it or to remove it by first using a scraper to knock the tops off the peaks then to ...


1

I'm almost confused more by the latest image, as in this one, the middle section is so much larger than the size of the ring around it. And my first guess of it being done with a bag are right out, due to the scale. So, assuming that the dark sections are the highs, and not the lows, I'm going to guess that even if it's not the right thing, you might be ...



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