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7

Those are definitely termite tubes. Those are the exploratory tubes that termites make when they come out of the soil and are exposed to air and light. They build the tubes out of dirt and their feces to protect them when out of the ground. Definitely termite tunnels. These are common on the side of a house, or inside a crawl space going up foundation walls. ...


7

If you do it your self (not endorsing, and see comment by The Evil Greebo) you could put a more secure plug in by using hydraulic cement. To ensure that it does not come out, holes or cracks are usually back cut (the hole is made wider below the opening so that its diameter is greater than the diameter of the opening). This can be done with a small masonry ...


4

Not termites! According to an NMSU Entomologist who examined my pictures, they are a type of Springtail. Thanks for turning me on to this whole "local cooperative extension" thing, Wayne. What a great resource!


4

Other than learning how to look for exterior telltale signs of termite damage, such as spent casings and holes in the wood or in the ground, you need to write in a contingency on your offer to purchase for a complete home inspection and/or an additional pest inspection. As mentioned above in the comments, hire your own home inspector and/or pest control ...


3

First, let's assume it is subterranean termites...because your post seems to indicate so. The obvious thing I deduce from your desription is that you are not finding termites in those tubes...hence your curiosity about what happens without the tubes. Point 1. Remember that the female worker termites--the one's eating your house--are blind and must have scent ...


3

Below grade you should not be using EPS foam - that should be XPS (pink or blue, normally) - above grade EPS is fine. EPS is not waterproof, XPS is. You can also increase your subgrade insulation a bit by setting a sheet (or portion of a sheet) going flat or angled slightly downwards away from the house at the top of the footing. If drainage is a concern ...


2

According to this paper from the University of Nebraska, they can go up to 20 feet in the ground: Subterranean termites are ground-dwelling social insects living in colonies. The two species found in Nebraska have similar habitats. These termites have the ability to adjust the depth of their colony (nest) in soil depending on temperature and moisture ...


1

The typical reason for specifying mineral wool in building construction is for fire-stopping because other materials tend to be more cost efficient insulators. Water-repellent does not mean water-proof. Mineral wool unlike - EPS or XPS - can hold moisture. Once wet, the water will negate any insulating properties because water is an excellent thermal ...


1

I can verify boron treated EPS degrades over time. Boron is water soluble, so the treatment doesn't last through more than a couple wet seasons. There's apparently a new insecticidal treatment being sold under the trademark Preventol. It's unclear how many years this treatment will remain effective. In any case, I think soil treatment should be used ...


1

Having bought at least 10 houses with termite issues I can offer the following advice: Have an independent inspector examine the house... After you have a specific termite inspection. For about $100 in my area you can have a reputable termite company come out and do a full inspection. They need to point out if they feel there are any nests outside - ...



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