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11

Imagine a 2-phase sub-panel: 2 bus bars down the middle, 2 lugs at the top to connecting the incoming power from the main panel. (No main breaker here because this is a sub-panel; the disconnect breaker for this type of panel lives in the upstream panel.) Now imagine a sub-panel that contains 2 completely independent sets of bus bars. This is a split bus ...


6

It means the slide is 16" long and that you can pull your drawer out a full 16" relative to the slide. If your cabinet space was 20" deep, and you mounted this all the way at the back then your drawer would not come out 16" but instead 16-4=12".


6

Looks like an L corner bracket/brace. Probably worth upgrading to a metal one if it would fit: Amazon product link


6

Rigid means something that will hold its shape on its own. Wood (except veneer), drywall, backer-board are all rigid. A piece of thin paneling made from plastic/fiberglass would not probably count. However, the definition is somewhat subjective. In the context of Green Glue, I presume they want to ensure no movement between the layers.


4

I am not certain what you mean by a "technical term" for it. I would call it a corner hutch or a corner display hutch or maybe a corner bookcase. Why corner? Because it is shaped to fit in a corner. Why hutch? A hutch is sometimes something that sits on top of a bureau, table, desk, or other piece of flat-topped furniture. However, hutches can also be a ...


4

Trim is a general term, often used to describe all types of molding and millwork. Casing is a type of molding, typically used to trim the perimeter of windows and doors. Casing is typically less wide (tall?), but thicker than base molding. 11/16" x 2 1/4" Base molding (or baseboard) is a type of molding, which is applied where the wall and floor meet. ...


4

If the door to the suite is in the foyer section, it could also be called the antechamber. That would make the bed section the main chamber or bedchamber. ...and of course, no discussion of chambers should ignore the chamberpot ;)


3

It's called "Master Bedroom". In your diagram, it's part of a "Master Suite", consisting of a foyer and a bedroom.


3

It's officially called a conduit body, but is sometimes called an LB by tradesmen. It's known as an "LB", because the outlet (or inlet I guess) is on the back (ell back). There are also "LR" (ell right), "LL" (ell left), "T" (tee), "C" (cee), and "SLB" (service ell back) type conduit bodies available. SLB not pictured.


2

I ran across this issue when building custom shelves. Found that the right search term is "Specialty Wood Suppliers". Add your area in and you will probably find something near you.


2

You can always add a decorative strip to enhance the thickness of the casing if it bothers you that much but if it looks good, don't worry about it and leave it. It's for whatever look that pleases you. It's just different words they use in construction for certain decorative accents. It's like getting gels instead of a regular manicure.


1

Formally, a Rigid Body is one that doesn't deform under stress. (i.e. It has a Young's Modulus of infinity). Practically, it means that it's a body that doesn't bend or flex under normal loading.


1

Don't know about ducts specifically, but that shaped joint is usually called a cross in other problem domains. http://xmzxl.en.alibaba.com/product/299354123-210434489/Cross_joint.html


1

16" refers to the length of the slide when closed, which will usually also be the depth of the drawer you're installing them on. Your cabinet (or whatever you're installing in) would need to be at least 16" deep, plus the thickness of any false front you may have on the drawer if you want to make them flush. It's also a nominal length--I just bought these ...



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