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7

For DIY you could use a RaspberryPi with a RaZberry (z-wave module for the Pi). RaZberry comes with a web-app and mobile apps. But you have to bring your controlling web-app into the net and care about the security! This way you can use standard z-wave products. In this case a radiator thermostat.


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If you are on the cheap and can afford running wires there is a cheap & efficient solution : Rasperry Pi ( Appx $40 ) Dallas 1-wire DS18B20 sensors ( Appx $2.5 each ) Spare Wire The sensors can be connected to the Pi without requiring an external adapter, then you can run a Home Automation supervisor such as OpenHAB to monitor it and triggers ...


4

One example for an out-of-the-box solution is RWE Smarthome They have a special temperature package, but unfortunately their shop seems to be in German only. There is another solution by Devolo. Both of them use portal you connect to, and offer mobile apps to control your system. But I think there are many other producers/distributors.


2

Yes. One example is the Honeywell CT50K1028/E which is your basic low voltage thermostat it goes down to 35 F. I'm pretty sure it will work for your application. No hacking or electronics work reqired. There are others. Do a search for " Garage thermostat"


2

You may be able to use a propane or natural gas powered fridge. They have no moving parts that would break; in the extreme cold, I'd imagine that only the pilot light would be on. I've stayed in a cabin that had one of these that was regularly exposed to -25 F, and it lasted for 40+ years. http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm


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Another option is an inline thermostat that will literally cut off all power to the frig once the temp drops below a certain point. That will prevent it from running when the temp is so low it could damage the frig. Something like this: Wiring diagram: It's good for 10 amps which should be plenty for a frig. $18 on Amazon ...


2

I don't see how a fridge could keep food above 32ยบ in sub-freezing temperatures unless it was specifically designed for that and has a heater. I assume that's how "The Gladiator" works? Frankly I don't believe that forum where someone claims stuff won't freeze. Maybe if it just dips below freezing for a few hours overnight, but long term there's just no ...


2

Smart Things offers a temperature sensor. You could then use their system to have it report the temperature to their ecosystem with alerts if it goes below or above a certain point as well as looking at it any time you would want from anywhere. For extra bonus, you could hook it up to Xively and get graphs out of the system.


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http://www.smarthome.com/la-crosse-technology-server-room-wireless-temperature-and-humidity-monitor.html plus many others on smarthome.com Another solution is to get an insteon thermostat at smarthome with a universal devices ISY 994i series controller will allow for advanced automation in the future. (disclaimer: I have many insteon devices and a ...


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Such a variation is not normal unless you are using an abnormally high amount of water so that the water heater does not have enough time to recover. Otherwise, since the heater worked properly when first installed, I would recommend calling the installer.


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If the modem is the only problem, replacing it might well solve the problem. As for finding a particular model of old modem at a non-outrageous price - ebay; sometime patience is needed for a very specific model or to get it at a non-absurd price, but generally modems are pretty cheap there. Where the number is programmed - to be certain, you'd need a ...


2

I can offer my suggestion for storing clothes and fabrics, but not books. When my wife and I had to store a TON of clothes, towels, sheets, jackets, sleeping bags, pillows...you get the idea....we used vacuum storage bags. Everything sat in a storage facility for over 2 years, the facility was unheated in the winter and zero air con in the summer. Being ...


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You should be just fine storing these in airtight containers, but ONLY if you are absolutely sure they're airtight. Airtight ideally means that there's no transfer of air between contents and the outside. If your plastic boxes are truly airtight, there's no air transfer happening, in either direction. Inside humidity at the point in time that you sealed a ...


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The room in question is fairly large and has several heat loss factors. Not withstanding the fact that the room sits on the cold basement floor, has large windows etc., the main problem is that the temp in the room is not thermostatically controlled properly. The only thermostat and heat zone is on the main floor and controls heat based on temps in the main ...


1

Simply exchanging the air between the rooms will equalize the temperatures because the air will mix. I would just cut two vents in the wall, one high and one low. Natural airflow probably won't be enough to balance the temperature, so put a fan in one or both of the vents. If you do both, point the fans in opposite directions. Again, it doesn't really ...


1

I am not aware of any professional products for this, but you could get an arduino or rasberry pi device with two temperature sensors, and hook it up to a bi-directional fan and write some code to have it automatically start at a certain temperature difference.


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Here's a dead-simple idea: use a PTAC unit to air condition the room with excess heat, and dump it into the adjacent room. That's the general idea behind how companies with huge server rooms recycle heat during wintertime. Their systems are much more sophisticated, of course, inevitably involving heat exchangers, water cooling, thermostats, multiple zones ...


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I would recommend first contacting a home energy efficiency company first rather than an HVAC company. HVAC guys are usually clueless about systemic problems like these and will usually try to sell you a larger unit without diagnosing the true cause of the issue (which is a pain in the neck and can probably be fixed for much less than the cost of new ...


1

If it's too wet and water starts to accumulate in the foundation, you can end up with weakened concrete. One of the key metrics for a concrete mix is the free water to cement ratio. If the water content is too low, you struggle to get it to compact properly , resulting in air voids, and weak concrete. If the water content is too high, the water can leave ...



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