Hot answers tagged

13

Many faucets have an adjustable range. In the last one I installed there was plastic ring with v-grooves around the outside of it: to adjust the range you positioned two stops that hooked into the v-grooves. Recommend the TIA* approach to see what you can see - it may be very straightforward. Just don't drop the screws down the drain! *Take It Apart


11

I assume you mean the roof is exposed to the sun...and that in turn is heating your ceiling? If so, options: make sure the roof is reflective (white/metallic) rather than a dark color (which absorbs heat) make sure the roof is insulated If the roof can support a green/planted roof, consider that. plant trees to shade the roof (obviously may take a few ...


9

You're dealing with a basic fact of nature, water condenses on cold objects, so you need to either remove the water or the cold objects. The windows will typically be the coldest objects in your home since they have such a low R value. Start by reducing the humidity in your home, run exhaust fans in the kitchen and bathroom for longer when cooking and ...


8

The short answer is to check with the bulb manufacturer. Ambient temperature and use case requirements may also be mentioned on the box/packaging. The long answer is that it depends (as always eh?). From what I could find online, CFLs and incandescent bulbs are actually MORE sensitive to LOW temperatures than LEDs. So in your specific use case, I would ...


8

This happens because water is diverted away from the shower to the toilet or washing machine. What happens next will depend on the type of shower and it's age. Older, non thermostatic showers will be affected to a greater extent. For an electric shower the flow of water through the shower will be reduced which will have the effect of heating it up further -...


7

I'd first check for leaks. Even a tiny crack can let a lot of cold air in over time. Caulking would be the proper solution, but since you're renting, foam weatherstripping tape may be a quicker/cheaper solution. Next, if the window is single-paned or otherwise just poor quality, the cold could be coming straight through the glass. (This is probably more ...


7

Led lamp color is measured in kelvins. Warm White is 2700 kelvins or 27K. This is 'supposed' to be equal to incandescent table lamps. Next is 30k which supposed to be equal to halogen. Next is cool white which in LED's can range from 39k to 45k. The next is 50k and then 65k. The higher the number the bluer the white is. It sounds like you want 27k. ...


7

For DIY you could use a RaspberryPi with a RaZberry (z-wave module for the Pi). RaZberry comes with a web-app and mobile apps. But you have to bring your controlling web-app into the net and care about the security! This way you can use standard z-wave products. In this case a radiator thermostat.


5

In our new house, the shower controls in the kids bathrooms are adjustable so you can set the temperature to prevent scalding. Even if the kids push the control all the way to HOT, the water will only be comfortably warm. I'm not sure about all controls, but on ours you pop the face off the control. Inside there are 2 (I think) geared rings that you can ...


5

I use shrink wrap. Simple and effective. Thermal loss is quite significantly by convection, not conduction. We used it to take on power bills as poor college students, but I also saw this method employed by million-dollar homes.


5

There are many ways to do what you want.. but none of them seem very easy as networking remains quite a complex thing to use, wired or wireless. Obviously you want to just plug in the power and forget about it. Using the Rasberry PI is most probably a very good idea, Its cheaper version (Model A) about £20, it can run Linux, you can use a WiFi dongle with ...


4

You also want to ventilate the attic space. If there is a space between the ceiling and the roof, its going to get pretty hot in there. In our house it can get above 190 °F. You can get gable mounted fans that suck in air from outside (at 100 °F, or what ever temperature it is outside) and force the 190 °F air out of the attic. Another thing ...


4

The thermocouple insures that the flame is on, it's used to shut the gas off if the flame goes out. Your problem sounds more like a thermostat. The thermostat measures the temperature of the oven, and is used to determine when to turn the flame on and off. Check the manufactures documentation for thermostat troubleshooting and replacement information. ...


4

Sounds like there is something wrong with the plumbing in the shower wall or more than likely the shower valve or stem system. If you are renting this isn't your responsibility. Not sure of your state's laws but if there is an issue like this in most states you can give the owner 2 notices and a reasonable amount of time and they have to pay for your ...


4

One example for an out-of-the-box solution is RWE Smarthome They have a special temperature package, but unfortunately their shop seems to be in German only. There is another solution by Devolo. Both of them use portal you connect to, and offer mobile apps to control your system. But I think there are many other producers/distributors.


4

If you are on the cheap and can afford running wires there is a cheap & efficient solution : Rasperry Pi ( Appx $40 ) Dallas 1-wire DS18B20 sensors ( Appx $2.5 each ) Spare Wire The sensors can be connected to the Pi without requiring an external adapter, then you can run a Home Automation supervisor such as OpenHAB to monitor it and triggers ...


3

I have a Radio Thermostat which has a webserver on it that returns information (and accepts controls) in JSON format. So once you have this installed, it would be pretty easy to write an app that runs on a local computer or a dedicated piece of hardware that pings the thermostat for data and then emails/tweets the results. Home Depot USA has Filtrete ...


3

One option is using Arduino based microcontroller. I recommend JeeNode for integrated wireless. For basic one "server" plus one remote sensor you need two JeeNodes, USB adapter, temperature sensor and battery, all for around 55 €. You need to know how to solder electronic components and program in C. Each additional sensor would cost about 20 €. Here is ...


3

Go to any big box store and get some 6" flexible insulated duct (this pic shows black sheathing on the outside, but it's often made of shiny reflective mylar): And a couple of 6" boots, one for each end: Use aluminum HVAC tape or a large band clamp or zip tie to connect the inner sleeve of the duct to the boots, then use another layer of tape to seal ...


3

If you can afford the LEDs to do it, and they are rated for that use, I'd definitely go that way. But at $20 to $70 per bulb, LEDs can cost you quite a bit. Also, would you leave twenty dollar bills scattered around out there? Or fifties? Consider if the LEDs might make an attractive theft target... I live in a slightly less cold climate, and we put ...


3

You may be able to use a propane or natural gas powered fridge. They have no moving parts that would break; in the extreme cold, I'd imagine that only the pilot light would be on. I've stayed in a cabin that had one of these that was regularly exposed to -25 F, and it lasted for 40+ years. http://home.howstuffworks.com/refrigerator5.htm


3

Your best bet would be an IR or instant read thermometer. You should test it from the closest faucet to the hot water tank, and make sure to let it run for several minutes first. If you do use a leave-in meat thermometer, it might take several minutes to get an accurate reading. Ice water should be close to 0C/32F (and if you add salt, it would get even ...


3

Congratulations - you have eliminated all the ways this might actually work. Either deal with it being hotter, or add a few options that you say are "not an option" with the most logical one being a connection to the central A/C. With a bucket, you could go with 50 pounds of ice, a fan blowing over it and a bucket for it to drain into as it melts. That ...


3

Put a box fan in the door, and let the central AC handle it.


3

The numbers are completely arbitrary, and are whatever the product manager or artist at the manufacturer decided they should be. They might be standardized within a company's product line. If these are private-label units, all bets are off. Numbers instead of real degrees means they used a thermostat too cheap to be consistent from unit to unit, so they ...


2

Doityourself has a good article called "How to Repair a Shower Faucet: Water Doesn't Get Hot" that covers how to troubleshoot and repair a cartridge-type shower faucet, which I suspect is your problem.


2

Is the shower mixer a thermostatic control? We have a similar set up. The one shower with a non-thermostatic mixer is a bit temperamental, but the other shower with a thermostatic mixer keeps a steady temperature. The former has a single control - left and right for temperature (though mixing), in and out for flow rate. The latter has two controls - one for ...


2

Yes. One example is the Honeywell CT50K1028/E which is your basic low voltage thermostat it goes down to 35 F. I'm pretty sure it will work for your application. No hacking or electronics work reqired. There are others. Do a search for " Garage thermostat"


2

Plan 1 I live in a desert, sometimes the hottest place in the USA, beating Death Valley. Lots of people here use evaporative coolers, or what we call swamp coolers. If you live in a humid area, then forget it because swamp coolers cool by putting a cool dampness in the air, nothing wet but on a hot dry day a properly sized cooler can cool a 2000 square ...


2

I have not used one of these yet (or course they are only up for pre order, shipping in June) but the Twine looks like it could be right up your alley. Out of the box ($99) it comes with a thermometer and accelerometer. It can tweet, email and text. It also has the ability to add more sensors. I have been waiting for this as I want to add the magnetic ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible