Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

First of all, buy a good drip free caulking gun. Make sure you cut the tip of the caulk on an angle. If you want a perfectly straight line on each side, put painters tape on each side of the area you want to caulk. Then just pull it up before the caulk dries. If you do not want to use your finger to smooth it, the little squeegie like tools that you can ...


10

Nylon mesh tape has some pros and good applications. It is best used on joints that may have more tendency to crack, seams with wider gaps, boards that don't fit real flush to each other. It is much stronger than paper tape, but more difficult to cover using straight tools.(as opposed to beveled or bow trowels) It saves time as you do not need a base mud ...


9

This can be done using Bender Board. You should be able to find it in both wood and recycled plastic. When using it to form concrete make sure you use enough stakes to hold the weight of the concrete.


9

As requested, here is my comment as an answer: I thought "caulk" was called "gap filler" internationally (a white substance like wet plaster). But your description sounds like silicone (and silicone-based sealants). If so, the magic trick for mess free edges isn't painter's tape, it's apply the silicone, then spraying the area with all-purpose cleaner ...


8

When hanging, there's the day laborer way, which is to put the drywall up over the box and then roto-zip the box, and there's the pro way, which is to cut the hole ahead of time because you've got the skill to measure and mark it. When mudding as in the above picture, the guys will often get a big chunk of mud into the box (It's hard not to... especially ...


8

I'm surprised that the switch controls the entire outlet -- generally in that setup (in North America at least), the switch only controls one plug, and the other plug is constant power. In that case of course, the answer is to use a power bar. It may even be worth checking in the plug to see if there is constant power available. You may be able to fix the ...


7

In addition to the things @Steve Jackson mentioned in his comment, the quick-drying mud (called setting compound) is also much harder to sand than the slower drying-type compound, which makes it not such a great choice for your final coats where you're going to be doing the most sanding. Pros use it because they're able to apply it so well that it requires ...


7

Certainly you will get better with practice. Also, as drywall (plasterboard in the UK) is quite soft you'd have to have the clutch on a low setting anyway. I find that if I don't get the screw at quite the right depth the first go I can usually just add an extra couple of twists by hand to get it bedded in to my satisfaction. Just make sure you get a ...


6

You certainly can put different types of mud on top of each other without any problems. Generally it's done the opposite way though - using the quick drying mud for the first/second coats and the pre-mix for the final coats. As for sandability, pre-mix is going to be the easiest to sand. The quick drying mud can still be sanded without much trouble ...


6

They are still working in compression - the only difference is the extra weight of the base, which hopefully is negligible compared to the load you are lifting. Edit: Assuming you have a dual acting system - where hydraulic fluid pushes against either side of the piston (rather than just an air jack where atmospheric pressure pushes it back) then there is ...


5

Cut the timber so it's flush with the top or just proud of the metal support. From the top, drill a few ½inch (12.5mm) holes as deep as you can into the remaining timber. Then with a "old" wood chisel cut away and remove the remaining timber. It's nearly impossible just to pull the timber post from the metal support as there are metal "wings" inside ...


5

You're doing it just right. The biggest mistake you can make when screwing in drywall is to drive the screw too deeply, tearing the paper outer layer. The paper is what's holding the plaster inside together enough to be screwed down in the first place, so keeping it intact is the key to a secure connection. You want the screw head to be just below the ...


5

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very ...


4

Preparation: definitely use a drop cloth. Because it's a wet job, I'd also recommend a putting down a layer of painter's plastic on top of the drop cloth. This will catch most of the splatter and makes clean-up a lot easier -- simply roll up the plastic. I believe the texture compound has some adhesive properties, so as long as the walls are clean, it'll ...


4

I have spent a great deal of time scrapping popcorn off ceilings. I don't know if that is the type of coating you are planning on, but I would tend to leave the ceilings smooth. I think that looks better. Textures ceilings were big in the 70's and 80's, but not so much now. Sorry, not an answer, just my opinion.


4

The Dimpler® attachment is a good idea if you're doing a small area. If you're doing a whole room or more either rent or buy a screw gun. It'll make life a lot easier.


4

I read on several DIY websites that recommended taping blue painter's tape the width of the bead you want to lay down. I tried it last night on my shower, and it worked fairly well. Here's what I did: Clean and dry area to be caulked Put tape on both sides of joint Caulk (my initial pass looked pretty messy) Use your finger or a caulk smoothing tool to get ...


4

Build up the piece in layers. It's a lot easier to bend a thin sheet of wood, then bending say a 3/4" piece. The basic idea here is to create an arched piece of plywood. Start with a thin sheet of wood 1/8" to 1/4" depending on the type of wood, and the finished pieces thickness. soak the sheet in water until it is pliable. Using clamps or a jig, bend the ...


4

If you are dealing with hydraulics there is always a chance of leakage with time or catastrophic failure. For this reason I would suggest the following: You should have a back up for holding the load in place if the hydraulics fail. This is quite often a simple pin that locks the piston in place in specialised systems but provided it is done adequately ...


4

The idea is that you have to slice, not push. Also these do not work for silicone rubber stoppers, they do work for natural rubber and cork stoppers. Well, I should say under human power. If you take the handle off the tube end of the borer and put it into a drill, like a bit, and use it that way, you will be able to drill through the silicone bungs. ...


4

One way is to take a long level (the longer the better : 6 and 8' levels work well). Hold one end of the level on the higher point, and then once the level is level, measure the gap between the other end and the floor using a measuring tape. This will give you your height over your run (length of level), for that particular spot in the floor anyways.


4

There are precision screwdrivers available that have larger handles, such as this one from Home Depot: In general, you press down on the tip while you screw in or out: this helps to hold the screwdriver in the slots in the screw head and allows you to use more force to turn the screw.


3

Most stucco/plaster patterns/textures aren't/weren't created by any particular tools but rather by incredibly highly skilled craftsmen. In otherwords, the pattern was created via decades of experience and skills rather than a particular tool. We have a stucco house and over the years I've talked to a few contractors and they all same the same thing...good ...


3

I watched the vid on Utube, very interesting. I don't use a slide chop saw for 2X4's (I use a 12" fixed) but that technique looks good to me. I think the reason is that taking two shallow passes is just as fast and doesn't load down the saw as much as a single pass. Since the angle of contact using a slide saw is much different than a fixed I can see why the ...


3

Like others have said, you could add a lock out switch which would prevent it from being flipped. You could also disconnect the switch, tie the wires together, but leave the switch in the box. That way it is not functioning and if someone flipped it, it would not matter. This is what I would probably do. If there is non switched power in the box, you ...


3

Wow, a 1/2 inch over 6 inches is quite the floor, sure it is not a roof?!?! lol. I have never heard of a standard expression for floor level. I would simply express it over the span of the entire floor or from the crown spot. Example, 1 inch over 12 feet across joists, or maybe 1/2 inch over 8 feet with joists. You are right saying that a long level can ...


3

Insulation is helpful even if it's not perfect. Ideally, you should cover the attic floor completely, without reducing airflow between any vents (soffit, ridge, gable, roof, whatever). Whether a specific area is important to insulate depends on your house, but as a rule, you should aim to insulate any walls/ceilings between living space and unconditioned ...


2

Practice makes perfect, but I'd recommend a drill with a clutch if you can scrounge one up. It's not fool proof, but it helps. If you're going to be doing a lot of drywall projects then your wish list should have something like this gun. It's great for decking too. Only a framing nailer is faster in my experience for putting stuff together.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible