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40

I've found that if you push the tip of the caulk gun forward along the line rather than drag it behind you can often make a very neat bead of caulk that needs little or no smoothing afterwards.


18

First of all, buy a good drip free caulking gun. Make sure you cut the tip of the caulk on an angle. If you want a perfectly straight line on each side, put painters tape on each side of the area you want to caulk. Then just pull it up before the caulk dries. If you do not want to use your finger to smooth it, the little squeegie like tools that you can ...


16

Buy a $5 drywall dimpler, the bit will slip off the screw head when the screw is at the appropriate depth.


12

There is a lot to know. Shortest answer: you should let experts handle anything you're not sure of. You need to comply with local building codes (This also means you need to know what those are. Inspectors don't accept ignorance as an excuse.) The design needs to be approved by an architect or structural engineer. There are strict requirements on ...


10

It sounds to me like the area you are caulking is not clean. Especially for tile, you need to make sure to really clean the area you will be caulking, as dust and soap scum will make it tough for the caulk to stick. Also, make sure you are using the correct kind of caulk for the job.


10

Metal landscape edging (the kind that's held in with stakes) should work fairly well. You could either just leave it there or cover it in plastic and remove it after the concrete sets (personally, I'd leave it).


10

Nylon mesh tape has some pros and good applications. It is best used on joints that may have more tendency to crack, seams with wider gaps, boards that don't fit real flush to each other. It is much stronger than paper tape, but more difficult to cover using straight tools.(as opposed to beveled or bow trowels) It saves time as you do not need a base mud ...


9

This can be done using Bender Board. You should be able to find it in both wood and recycled plastic. When using it to form concrete make sure you use enough stakes to hold the weight of the concrete.


9

To prevent the messiness when smoothing it out with your finger, have a moist sponge handy. Smooth out a couple feet of calk, then wipe your finger on the sponge to get the excess caulk off and keep your finger moist.


9

As requested, here is my comment as an answer: I thought "caulk" was called "gap filler" internationally (a white substance like wet plaster). But your description sounds like silicone (and silicone-based sealants). If so, the magic trick for mess free edges isn't painter's tape, it's apply the silicone, then spraying the area with all-purpose cleaner ...


8

I'm surprised that the switch controls the entire outlet -- generally in that setup (in North America at least), the switch only controls one plug, and the other plug is constant power. In that case of course, the answer is to use a power bar. It may even be worth checking in the plug to see if there is constant power available. You may be able to fix the ...


8

When hanging, there's the day laborer way, which is to put the drywall up over the box and then roto-zip the box, and there's the pro way, which is to cut the hole ahead of time because you've got the skill to measure and mark it. When mudding as in the above picture, the guys will often get a big chunk of mud into the box (It's hard not to... especially ...


7

In addition to the things @Steve Jackson mentioned in his comment, the quick-drying mud (called setting compound) is also much harder to sand than the slower drying-type compound, which makes it not such a great choice for your final coats where you're going to be doing the most sanding. Pros use it because they're able to apply it so well that it requires ...


7

Certainly you will get better with practice. Also, as drywall (plasterboard in the UK) is quite soft you'd have to have the clutch on a low setting anyway. I find that if I don't get the screw at quite the right depth the first go I can usually just add an extra couple of twists by hand to get it bedded in to my satisfaction. Just make sure you get a ...


7

It sounds to me that you cut your tip to far down. Try cutting it closer to the top so the hole is smaller. A good caulk gun will help too and they aren't too expensive (about $12 at lowes or home depot).


6

You certainly can put different types of mud on top of each other without any problems. Generally it's done the opposite way though - using the quick drying mud for the first/second coats and the pre-mix for the final coats. As for sandability, pre-mix is going to be the easiest to sand. The quick drying mud can still be sanded without much trouble ...


6

They are still working in compression - the only difference is the extra weight of the base, which hopefully is negligible compared to the load you are lifting. Edit: Assuming you have a dual acting system - where hydraulic fluid pushes against either side of the piston (rather than just an air jack where atmospheric pressure pushes it back) then there is ...


6

IMHO this is sloppy mudding, pure and simple. If it were my project, it would be the responsibility of the dry waller, but I am not a contractor.


6

I just got an answer by email from the owner of a company in France that specializes in artisanal plaster work. He recognizes it as a very thin lime-plaster that was applied with a bundle of leaves like these: with a whipping motion. He calls this type of finish an enduit fouetté which translates as whipped lime-plaster. He suggests that we mix a very ...


5

You're doing it just right. The biggest mistake you can make when screwing in drywall is to drive the screw too deeply, tearing the paper outer layer. The paper is what's holding the plaster inside together enough to be screwed down in the first place, so keeping it intact is the key to a secure connection. You want the screw head to be just below the ...


5

Use a upside down 5 gallon bucket, paint can, or anything that is deep enough to not get buried in the concrete. They use several old 5 gallon buckets leftover from construction in our basement.


5

What about a Rubbermaid container? The kind they have to hold ice and drinks/kegs seems about the size you want.


5

Cut the timber so it's flush with the top or just proud of the metal support. From the top, drill a few ½inch (12.5mm) holes as deep as you can into the remaining timber. Then with a "old" wood chisel cut away and remove the remaining timber. It's nearly impossible just to pull the timber post from the metal support as there are metal "wings" inside ...


4

I read on several DIY websites that recommended taping blue painter's tape the width of the bead you want to lay down. I tried it last night on my shower, and it worked fairly well. Here's what I did: Clean and dry area to be caulked Put tape on both sides of joint Caulk (my initial pass looked pretty messy) Use your finger or a caulk smoothing tool to get ...


4

Build up the piece in layers. It's a lot easier to bend a thin sheet of wood, then bending say a 3/4" piece. The basic idea here is to create an arched piece of plywood. Start with a thin sheet of wood 1/8" to 1/4" depending on the type of wood, and the finished pieces thickness. soak the sheet in water until it is pliable. Using clamps or a jig, bend the ...


4

Preparation: definitely use a drop cloth. Because it's a wet job, I'd also recommend a putting down a layer of painter's plastic on top of the drop cloth. This will catch most of the splatter and makes clean-up a lot easier -- simply roll up the plastic. I believe the texture compound has some adhesive properties, so as long as the walls are clean, it'll ...


4

The Dimpler® attachment is a good idea if you're doing a small area. If you're doing a whole room or more either rent or buy a screw gun. It'll make life a lot easier.


4

I have spent a great deal of time scrapping popcorn off ceilings. I don't know if that is the type of coating you are planning on, but I would tend to leave the ceilings smooth. I think that looks better. Textures ceilings were big in the 70's and 80's, but not so much now. Sorry, not an answer, just my opinion.



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