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7

Looks to me like you have a GALANT leg. From IKEA's website The legs shall be fitted on to the frame before the table top is put in place. If you only have the table and legs, you may not have everything you need. Based on instructions found at the customer service site linked to by alt, you need to put the legs onto the frame bar piece, then put the ...


3

There is a way to create such a composite timber. Actually, all other things being equal (the species, cut and quality of the wood), a built up sandwich is actually stronger than a solid piece of wood. This is done by laminating the three boards together. A generous layer of wood glue, such as Titebond II, is spread over one face of one of the boards. The ...


2

I like the enthusiasm, that's great. A couple suggestions: 1. Start off with a solid design, including what sort of materials might work. Let the wood material options drive some of the design which would help to save costs. Explore the wood section at the depot and see what is offered. Wood can get expensive. So let the options of wood drive the design. ...


2

Using two legs at a "T" will result in a table that is very prone to tipping. In the diagram below, the sum of the moments (torque) about the R1-R2 axis must be zero for the table to remain in equilibrium. Just before the table tips, all the reaction force from the legs against the floor will be concentrated at R1 and R2. If the weight of the table at the ...


2

Well if drilling is not an option than that eliminates castors, which would be the logical choice. If you have hard surface flooring you could apply furniture pads (high density felt) to the feet and just slide it around.


2

You can always use a masonry grinding wheel and a level, but be warned, there will be a LOT of dust! You'll want to seal off the room from the rest of the house, open the windows, put fans in the windows, wear goggles and a respirator. They sell shrouds that you can hook up a shop vac to the grinder to get a good bit of the dust, but it's still bad. And at ...


1

The classic way to get a great finish on a concrete tabletop with minimal tooling is to pour it (upside down) on a glass sheet. If your table is smaller than a patio door, you can generally find a free patio door that someone has removed if you look for a while on craigslist or other classified ad sources, or check at the local recycling center. The main ...


1

I don't know about the UK, but in the US I'd look in the phonebook or online for "portable lumbermill service". There are indeed devices which can be brought to a jobsite and set up to slice boards from a felled trunk. Definitely worth considering for hardwoods, if you have a place to store the resulting lumber until it dries (typically a year per inch of ...


1

As it appears the 'wobble' is between the metal leg, the metal bracket, and the bolts provided, I'd say this wobble is due to IKEA's ahem rather wide tolerance specifications. In other words, sometimes you just get wobble when it comes to IKEA products. :) I'd suggest using something to solidify the connection between the leg and the plates. JB Weld would ...


1

FWIW, hot melt glue is very useful for this sort of thing. It's a slightly less permanent solution than JB Weld/epoxy. However, it also requires you work fast, so YMMV as they say :-)


1

Going from those pictures, it kind of looks like you drive the screws through the holes in the table surface into the legs. :)


1

you can build the table with two legs on two sides, just like the coffee table in the picture. This can keep the stability.


1

So you are (if I get your idea correctly) looking at two large-diameter log sections, large enough that two of them would serve as all the legs needed for your table? Could be a nice look. If you get lucky, you might find a hollow beech. Pine, less likely in usable form - if it's hollow it's usually also rotten outside that. Assuming you don't get lucky: ...



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