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14

The minimum would be diagonal bracing on back and side. +---+ | /| | / | |/ | +---+ Triangles resist lateral forces much better than rectangles do.


5

They're called table slides or extension slides. They generally come in 2 versions - one for pedestal type tables (sometimes called equalizer slides) and one for traditionally legged tables. As far as the design goes, you're pretty much limited to your imagination and woodworking ability. Just build it like you would any other extending table, but with the ...


5

You could add some very large steel L brackets to brace the legs and try to stiffen them a bit, but it would still be somewhat shakey. The "right" way to fix this is to use "cross bracing". The two cross members you have on the back should be diagonal instead of horizontal. Diagonal cross members prevent the side-to-side wobble that makes your table feel ...


3

I was eating a Wendy's burger on our wooden dining table. When I picked up the wrapper, Wendy's face was staring up at me from the tabletop! I immediately Googled and found this article. I tried a gentle surface cleaner with no luck. I read the approaches listed in this article, but was bummed as I have no mayo, no ashes, etc. My wife is an Essential ...


3

A properly glued panel will be significantly stronger than a panel that is joined only with pocket screws. That being said, pocket screws can still be useful to eliminate the need for clamps while the glue dries. A single panel (like a tabletop made of several planks of wood glued/screwed together) will expand/contract as a single piece, hence why the need ...


3

Just in basic table design you are missing the horizontal supports right under your table top. The first three horizontal supports are not only too low, too thin, but they are also installed wrong. You have them going across the table legs. If they were inside the table legs the tables would be set to a fix point. As it stands you have created a flex ...


2

According to the tabletop glass load calculator found here, and to my slight surprise, this table top can hold about 400 pounds. I certainly wouldn't jump up and down on it, and any scratches might compromise it to some extent. I told the calculator the glass is tempered, 1/2" thick, 18" x 54" with supports spaced 4 feet apart. Make sure you know the glass ...


2

If the wood is dented rather than cut/gouged, you can steam dents out with a clothes iron (preferably a steam iron, but not required if you keep the washcloth damp), a damp washcloth, and some patience. If it's actually cherry, and not just "whatever, with stain, called cherry since we used a reddish brown stain" it is best to remove and not replace the ...


2

Why not both? I have built cabinet doors where the rails and styles were attached to each other using glue and pocket screws. I left the center inserts free floating. The doors swelled and shrunk overall, as new wood will, but the joints are tight after several years. I agree that more flexible fastening between the top and the base makes sense since the ...


1

To support loads at the edge of the table, your brackets apply a torque to the wall. Let's say you're using two brackets, and 3/4 of the 50kg is on the edge of the 25" deep table (maybe it isn't, but someday someone's going to lean on it...) The top anchor bolt in the bracket pulls out from the wall, and the bottom edge of the bracket pushes in, generating ...


1

Adding a second thin sheet of glass probably won't do a lot to reinforce the first, thicker sheet. First, the weight carrying ability of a sheet of glass increases at somewhere between the square and the cube of the thickness, so a 1/2" sheet can carry between 4 and 8 times as much weight as a 1/4" sheet. Plus, the thinner sheet is more flexible, so at any ...


1

If you have a right sized hole saw or a dowel you can shove in there, up to the screw then you can put on another caster on or the old caster if just its mounting was broken. If you don't have those, then a square peg in a round hole will do the same. With those wood options it would be best to have pieces long enough to go past the screw above, so you can ...


1

If you use only four support points, your glass top is actually sitting on a square about 2.12 feet on each side. So your overhang for a 4 foot circle is about 11 on each side. Tempered glass is very strong (note that annealed or hardened glass is also strong, but much less so than tempered). This calculator suggests that a 1/2" tempered glass shelf 11" x ...


1

Definitely not! Unsupported ends & center is a big no-no. Support means that it won't bend AT ALL. Why? Because glass doesn't bend...for long.


1

I agree that replacing with tempered glass is your best option. But if you want cheap, there are other options. I don't know about regular super glue or Krazy glue. It would probably work fine. Loctite makes a super glue specifically for glass. I used to work for an art glass/leaded glass company 20 years ago and we used a glue that was cured by UV light....


1

A simple 2x2 cut and then mounted to wall so the table half will rest on it. Then from the underside of the 2x2 attach the table with screws that will pass through the 2x2 but short enough they will not go completely through the table top.


1

I had a similar stain on a counter top with a gloss acrylic type finish that appeared to absorb the printing from a plastic shopping bag. I knew from past experience that any kind of strong base solvent (acetone) will quickly dissolve and strip it, and harsh abrasives scratch. Several ordinary household cleaners did nothing. I tried a simple mix of olive ...


1

Just used GooGone to remove stains caused by a plastic shopping bag. If you use a little elbow grease and a cloth like a facecloth should take it right off and no damage to the table top in my case.



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