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9

Put the table/chair on a very flat and very horizontal surface. Ensure and double check with a levelgauge. shim the table/chair so that the top surface of the table/chair is level using the level gauge Take a pencil and tape it on a small block that is about the height you want the legs to shorten. Ensure that the block has parallel bottom and top planes. ...


7

Looks to me like you have a GALANT leg. From IKEA's website The legs shall be fitted on to the frame before the table top is put in place. If you only have the table and legs, you may not have everything you need. Based on instructions found at the customer service site linked to by alt, you need to put the legs onto the frame bar piece, then put the ...


7

An easier method to using dividers is to get a piece of string, wrap it around the circumference of the table surface, and mark the and where the string meets itself. Measure the length, divide by 3, then mark off the thirds on the string. Put the string back on and use the third marks to find the leg positions. It's not as exacting as @woodchips method but ...


6

Your task is to find the studs.. Electronic versions of stud finders abound, plaster is difficult for most of them. I have a 1/2 dozen of them.. I keep hoping. The problem with plaster is the lath used to support it. The lath can be a variety of materials: wood strips, metal mesh and even pasterboard. All of these materials are attached to the studs ...


5

First, figure out how much you want to take off. Let's say it's 3". I can think of a couple ways to do this. Both ways require a perfectly flat floor - so you should actually double-check that with a long level first, to be sure there isn't any major sagging or something. One way is to use a level and measuring tape, and place a mark exactly 3" up, plumb ...


5

User is right saying you should cut the rough shape with a band saw. If you don't have one, you can use a jig saw but use the most rigid blade that will follow the form. The next step will be to use a table mounted rotary sander/ drum sander to work the piece to the scribed line. It will be next to impossible to make a well shaped piece without this step. ...


4

Put chairs next to it! Honestly it will rot. However most of the rot will either come from bugs or water sitting on it. If you can spray it for termites/bugs and sit something decorative on top of it, it will last longer. Maybe your "tree table" could be your "table leg" for another form of table top. A big circle picnic table top (or whole thing) might ...


4

It will rot. Eventually. However, there's no reason why you can't enjoy it as a table for many years. I'd smooth off the surface after it dries a bit and seal it with a deck sealer. This will help preserve the top. But it will continue to rot from below, and eventually you'll have to remove it. How long from now "eventually" actually is is dependent ...


4

Per the question, I used Minwax until it faded, but it was still quite obvious and visible (close to the last pic in the question post). Then, taking a page from the "mayo and ashes" tip, I mixed 1-part mayonnaise (Hellman's) to 1-part baking soda (not baking powder; I used Arm & Hammer brand) as a cigarette ashes replacement. I rubbed the mixture ...


3

There is a way to create such a composite timber. Actually, all other things being equal (the species, cut and quality of the wood), a built up sandwich is actually stronger than a solid piece of wood. This is done by laminating the three boards together. A generous layer of wood glue, such as Titebond II, is spread over one face of one of the boards. The ...


3

42 inch Closed ... For up to 135" of leaves ..." http://www.moinhardware.com/page15/page15.html ... OR ... check out the table demo at 3:22 into this video: http://vimeo.com/55389782 also here: http://www.resourcefurniture.com/space-savers/space-saving-tables/goliath "...extends from 17” to 115” utilizing a unique aluminum telescoping mechanism."


3

Short answer, vertical and strong. I have an old Saginaw Expand-o-Matic that opens from 24" to 90" and is designed to only use the end legs, no middle support. Not sure where you could find this hardware today though. You want the sliders to be vertical because the majority of the stress will be vertical stress of the table and contents weight. It also ...


3

Use a bandsaw to get the rough shape (jigsaw blades tend to deflect when cutting thick stock). In order to keep the leg strong, make sure that you have at least a small section of wood that runs undisturbed from the floor to the table top. I have a very old buffet that was made with curved legs, and it has a weak spot in the leg that tends to shear off and ...


2

Depends on what the table is used for. Given the description of wear, let's assume it's a college project work table, that needs to handle anything from homework writing, gaming, to x-acto knife cutting, to light woodworking, painting, etc. I would suggest hardboard (aka Masonite). It ain't fancy, but it's cheap, widely available in 4 ft x 8 ft sheets (so ...


2

The plies (layers) in plywood are run in alternating directions, so approximately half of the layers visible on any edge will be end grain and half will be the long grain. End grain usually absorbs more finish which makes it look darker. If you want to minimize the difference between the plies you could seal the edges of the plywood with shellac before you ...


2

You'll be leaning over trying to eat off of it since your legs have nowhere to go. You could always carve the sides or add a top if you are determined to make a table. However, I would do something else like use it for a planter. I saw a large diameter stump the other day with beautiful plants growing out the top, it looked really neat. Besides, it is ...


2

Using two legs at a "T" will result in a table that is very prone to tipping. In the diagram below, the sum of the moments (torque) about the R1-R2 axis must be zero for the table to remain in equilibrium. Just before the table tips, all the reaction force from the legs against the floor will be concentrated at R1 and R2. If the weight of the table at the ...


2

Not quite what you're looking for, but one option would be to cut the bevels off one end of each table, and join them together with pins, mending braces and glue. You'd need to really carefully plane the cut edges down to get a nice join. Then you could just continue to use the leafs as designed. The only drawback is that you'd have a 120" long table in ...


1

Deep scratches and broken edges are a bad sign. If you want to learn about stone polishing, this would be a good learner project. Don't expect to be able to craft a Michelangelo. A matte finish would be reasonable, and expect to leave the deeper scratches in place. Matte marble finish should be polished out to 1500 grit. Gloss finish out to 3000 and ...


1

A stripper gel is worth a shot. Never tried myself. I'd definitely use a heavy duty respirator with that stuff. A big no way on the pressure washer ;). You might also try contoured sanding pads. I use these all the time. Sanding just sucks and takes devotion.. http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2005237/10568/large-contour-sanding-pads-6-piece.aspx ...


1

Not to get really in depth because your tastes are your tastes but if you are looking for a lot of weight and performance I would make the legs out of 4x4s and the top/bottom trim out of 2x6's, attaching the 4x4s to the 2x6s with 2 lag bolts in each post - corners would have 4 bolts - 2 on each side. Edit: There should be the sets of lag bolts (so 4 for ...


1

You could use some laminate surface. Melamine has very good protection on water, it's very easy to clean, is as flat as the surface and dice will roll as much as you want. Plastic laminate with a wood edge has the same protection but it kinda looks like wood. All you need is a lot of patience and contact cement. If you want to use wood i would go with ...


1

There is a rather simple tool called a protractor which is taylor made for this situation. Here is an example of one: These are available in various sizes in the school supply section of many retail markets. Simply draw a line from the center of the table top to the outside perimeter (1). Then use the protractor to measure off an angle of 120 degrees ...



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