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Improper Electrical Wiring constitutes a serious life safety hazard. It can be the source of structural fire and potentially fatal shocks. I am not saying that you can't splice a common electrical wall switch into an extension cord. I am saying that it is not a good general practice. Consider Instead Installing a suitable hardwired outlet and wall ...


2

If there are studs at either end of a two gang switch box, that means they are approximately 4 inches apart. A three gang requires 6 inches. A switch box is usually about 3.5 inches high; with thickness that means turned sideways, it will fit in a dual ganged space. So you have room for 20 switches if you want: (from here)


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Pretty simple question that seems to have gotten out of hand. I believe the OP was trying to fix or modify a work bench like this one, pictured. These would be the correct off-the-shelf parts... pretty legit if you ask me. Good luck finding a non-Decora GFCI for it, no wonder they needed a seprate GFCI.


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I agree with the other comments and answers that call out that the components you've identified seem dodgy and that you could be using off-the-shelf parts. That said, I agree with the general idea of what you're trying to do and I have built a similar system in my shop; let me describe it for you. First off, the shop outlets and the shop lights are on ...


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Any thoughts? Plainly something is messed up. I have many times taken apart a switch and discovered that the previous homeowner was creative in their choices. A recent one: white was hot and black was neutral, ground was open, the switch was wired to interrupt the neutral, the white wire from the lamp was connected to the black wire from the wall, and ...


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You'll start by connect the grounding conductor to the green screw. The black wires that are currently attached to the old switch, will attach to the black and brass colored screws on the new switch. Finally you'll have to locate a grounded "neutral" wire; or group of wires, within the box. Using a twist-on wire connector, connect a short bit of wire to the ...


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The neutral is required to power the motion sensor and solid state timer. It cannot function without at least 1 hot and one neutral. Since all neutrals should be joined in the breaker box to one terminal block, any neutral in the house will work. Also (while not recommended, by the NEC you could wire neutral to anything in the house that's grounded, ...


2

You can do it using only 12/2 and 12/3 cables like this. Or you could use 12/2 and 12/4 cables like this. Because there will be so many wires in the box, you'll want to get at least a 34 cu. in. double gang box. Like this one. NOTES: I've excluded grounding conductors from the images to increase clarity. Do not forget to connect all grounding ...


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What you're describing is called "scene lighting" and is customarily achieved using automation modules either at the switches or fixtures. Each of the four configurations you have shown would be its own scene, and you would program each automation module to respond as either on or off when each scene is selected. I have use Insteon automation modules for ...


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It could be the connection or the sensor. If those connectors move a lot when you wiggle them, they may just be loose, and vibrations from the furnace affecting them. So the first thing I would try is pulling the connectors off and squeezing them a little bit with a pair of pliers, so they dig in a little tighter when you put them back on. That costs ...


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With almost all relatively new (last 15 years) bath fan/light kits you will be able to do this. You simply wire vanity and light together with hot on switch and give fan timer. To do you one better I have been installing lutron dimmers-timer in all of my new remodels. So the top half of the switch is simply a dimmer - we hook this up to the fan light. ...



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