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Based on the information you provided, you will need to pull a new 12/3 cable to your new 3-way switch. You will also have to replace your existing switch with a 3-way switch. You wiring setup will look like this:


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Looks like it might be an EJ500 Astro In-Wall Timer, or similar device. Here's a link to the Installation Instructions (PDF). According to the instructions, the switch at the top of the device is an "air gap" switch. Which is "designed to turn power off for routine maintenance". You remove the battery holder "by prying left and right of the holder ...


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Do you know what the part pointed to by the red arrow is for? I am not familiar with this unit but the indicated item seems like it could be a catch to allow the control panel unit to be removed from the wall mount. It is also possible that this could be a manual override switch although this seems more unlikely from looking at the pictures.


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http://www.kyleswitchplates.com/push-button-light-switches/ will get you what you are looking for


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OEM builder grade anything is not the best. replace with a heavy duty switch and use the things on the side called screws. builder grade is meant to have a life time that exceeds the home warrantee but cheap enough so they feel that their profit margin was boosted enough so they con focus on other corners to cut. I know I installed thousands of them as a ...


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Yes, you just have to buy the right dimmer. Here in the USA, most dimmers are compatible with 3-way circuits. I'm not sure if that's true in your area, so you'll have to verify when buying the dimmer. NOTE: In the USA we would call this type of circuit a 3-way, while other countries (yours included) refer to it as a 2-way circuit.


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In addition to all the other comments, I would suspect you have reversed colour code- IOW, the wiring may have been installed using white as hot FROM THE BREAKER BOX. I knew of a house that was wired switched neutral all over the house BY A LICENSED CONTRACTOR. The woman's son died from this gross violation. Many licensed contractors hire untrained ...


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OMG what a mess!!!, you are correct this is a switched neutral situation. the white wires are neutrals and should be tied together with out a switch. the black wires should go to the switches. a white wire can be used on a light switch or a switched plug... if it is then make sure it is the sire going to the load and not the hot side. black red blue ...


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See this little tab here? Turn the power to this box off at the circuit breaker, and verify it's off. Then grab the little tab with a pair of needle nose pliers, and bend it back and forth until it breaks off. Once you restore power, half of the receptacle will be controlled by the switch, while the other will be always on. A couple other notes about ...


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You are right to be concerned about switched neutrals. A dangerous situation. You can test it by using a non-contact tester similar to this one Turn on the breaker (after making sure no terminals are touching anything metal). Check the wires going to each of the switches. If wired correctly, one of each should be hot. If they are not, you have a ...


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To make one outlet switched and one outlet on all the time, you need to break off that little brass tab on the outlet in between the where the black and red wires are screwed in. To make both outlets switched, you need to disconnect and cap the red wire that is screwed into the outlet and not break off that brass tab. Don't mess with the tab on the neutral ...


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Sounds like you have your switch leg ( switch loop ) mixed up. You need to isolate it. It is the wire going to the switch. A simple continuity test will determine which wire is the switch leg. You need a continuity tester and most voltage testers check continuity. As for the ground, there is none available unless you provide a new circuit to the panel ...


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The first step is to read through the user's guide, and make sure it's not in a "test" mode. If after reading the manual it still wasn't working, I'd exchange it for a different unit. If the new unit didn't work, I'd either try a different brand/model, or forget about using an occupancy sensor.


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With GFCI Protection of Devices If you want to provide GFCI protection of the fixture, you'd feed the switches from the LOAD side of the GFCI device. Without GFCI Protection of Devices If you don't want to provide GFCI protection to the devices, you'd feed the switches from the incoming feeder. NOTE: I've labeled one of the dimmer terminals as "C" ...


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Turns out im an idiot. This new fan is one with a Bluetooth speaker built in. From the manual: To operate the fan in speaker mode, turn the switch to the on position. To operate the fan in fan + bluetooth mode, turn the switch off and then back on again within 2s. Doh! Thanks for the help everyone


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This is symptomatic of a poor connection somewhere, or a bad-on-arrival fan. I'd rewire the switches using the screw terminals as a first step (don't forget to hook the grounds up when you do), and if that does not cure it, I'd try Craig's troubleshooting suggestion of switching the fan and the light. If the fan still acts up, then return the fan to ...


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So the blue wire in your fan fixture is power to the light on the fan. The black wire is power to the fan. Current code calls for a neutral wire in any switch box, even if you don't use it yet and have to cap it with a wire nut. If you want to control the lights and the fan independently from the wall switch (so the fan doesn't come on ever time you flip ...


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Nothing complicated about it. Power to switch. Power from switch to fan. Power to thermostat. Power from thermostat to fan; or, more likely if you cannot source a thermostat rated to switch the motor load directly: Power to thermostat. Power to relay. Power from thermostat to relay coil. Power from relay contacts to fan. [in this case, the switch could ...



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