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You do not need to attach the green tail to the grounding wire in the box. By properly attaching this device to a properly grounded metallic box you are inherently providing an adequate grounding path. NEC 2011 404.9 Provisions for General-Use Snap Switches (B) Grounding. Snap switches, including dimmer and similar control switches, shall be ...


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It's possible that you are detecting residual voltage from the neutral through the lamps at one switch (in the order of 50V often), you can use a multimeter in voltage mode and see how much voltage you actually detect. Or take out the bulbs from the fixtures and check again. Other wise you can (with the breaker off) connect 2 wires at one switch then check ...


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You would be best advised to shut off all live power feed to this box. Then pull the existing bare copper GND wires out of the back of the box and add an additional bare copper wire pigtail to the bunch. Then reattach to the box with the proper green grounding screw. The new pigtail will get wire nutted to the green wire on your new dimmer switch using an ...


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you have a relay in your light box hence the yellow wire it is mounted threw a k.o. in the box your switches are connected to the relay outside the box in attic space, relay coil is 12or 24v. its an automated house. check your voltage again at switches. you should have 12vac or 24vac dick


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The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


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Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


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It sounds like you have power entering the junction box at the light fixture, then running to one of the switches. If you actually have power entering both switch boxes independently, this will never work and you need to look at the connections at the light fixture. EDIT Here's a 3-way switch: Here's what should be happening in your case in order for the ...


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From what you described and showed, and assuming that it was just a regular single pole switch you replaced that worked fine before, the wiring does look correct (though I'd skip the extra black pigtail wire that goes between the white and orange wire nuts). Sounds like the switch itself is defective, and the best course of action would be to exchange it ...


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I'm surprised that the box or paperwork that came with the switch didn't have instructions, so here is my advice (25 years as an electrician): The black wire goes to the hot bundle, the green wire is ground, and the blue wire goes to the light that is being switched. If there is a pig-tail that acted as an individual wire to the old switch, you can either ...


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I had the same problem, intermittent flames, sometimes no response no matter how long I leave the switch to on position. Thanks to the knowledge here I measured the voltage on the wire and it was 320 millivolts. So I cleaned the contacts and the wire and reassembled the switch. Voila, works perfectly now. Thanks everybody. Just a little sandpaper on the ...


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You could go the route of having no switches in the bathroom, and only a plug and switch upstairs Loft. Step 1: Get a standby plug adapter, which will shut off power to the TV when its in standby mode. this will reduce electrical risk, fire and save power. - the unit has an infra-red reset switch, so when it senses your remote IR beam, it will energise the ...


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I am also remodeling our bathroom and have placed the on/off switch next to the light switch which is outside the bathroom door as you enter. I guess the other way would be to use a normal corded isolation switch mounted on the ceiling. Good luck ( I am also not a qualified electrician but do have a friendly one who checks what is done and would recommend ...


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You should read the instructions included with the new switch. You'll likely find that the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) wire, the white is a grounded (neutral), and the red is the switched "hot" wire. If there are only two wires coming into the box, you won't be able to connect the timer. The timer requires a grounded (neutral) connection, which is ...


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Does anyone know what voltage a "healthy" thermopile produces? A little Googling does not give me a clear answer; I've seen everything from 30mV to 750mV, but I am leaning towards 750mV being the correct answer. I have the problem described in this thread and my thermopile is producing 300mV DC from the pilot light, measured at the switch. I've taken an AA ...


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First off, if there's not a grounded (neutral) conductor in the box, you cannot connect this device. Based on your description of the wiring, it's difficult to tell exactly how your current switch is wired. If you're not sure yourself how the current switch is wired, it might be best for you to contact a local licensed Electrician to install the switch for ...


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As discussed in the comments above, I removed all crud & corrosion, so by process of elimination I am hopefully getting closer to an answer which is contained in this very elaborate detailed response; check it out


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I've never seen an electric shower (looks to be a European thing?) but based on the diagram in that article you've got electrical contacts near moisture. Corrosion is quite likely and would cause intermittent problems like you describe. Turn off all power to the device then open it and check for "crud" on any of the electrical terminals. a fine brass-bristle ...


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Tester is spot on about the lack of a neutral conductor, all you have is a hot and switched, the outlet doesn't have the necessary wiring. You'll need to run another line with a neutral. If that line also contains another hot then you can break off the tab between the two hot screws and wire the bottom with the new hot/neutral. If that hot comes from a ...


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There doesn't appear to be a grounded (neutral) conductor in the box. Looks like it's a simple switch loop, that somebody tried installing a combination receptacle on. It looks like the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) conductor, and the white wire is a switched ungrounded (hot) conductor. There's no way to add a receptacle here, unless you pull a ...


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Can you take the cover off a switch and take a photo to show us? I rewired my 1959 house in 2011. Although the switches and receptables were not grounded, there was a ground in every box. (Although electrical code can vary by jurisdiction, I would be surprised if your electrical boxes were not grounded.)



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