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2

Without running an additional switched hot lead, it can be done using radio frequency transmitting switches which control a RF receiver/relay which you would have to wire into the ceiling box. Leviton makes devices like that. They are neither simple nor cheap. In my opinion it would be easier, quicker, and cheaper to fish a new wire or even open the wall. ...


2

The easiest option would be to run a new cable directly from the switch, up to the ceiling fixture. You'll want to either install a larger box and a new switch, or a double switch, so the light can be controlled independently. If you're working in a home constructed of solid wood framing, you should be able to run the new cable fairly easily. Since you ...


2

Depending on the condition of the floor above your ceiling, it might be easier and cheaper to access the ceiling void through the floor. For example, if the floor upstairs is going to be renovated too, or if the floor cover is a carpet, which can be lifted and put back easily, or even better - if it is just the original floorboards, you can easily lift one ...


2

First, never notch the bottom of beams. All electrical runs should be in the center third of any timber. This is for structural support as well as protecting the electrical. If you want to keep the wall outlet switched, consider knocking out the current one gang and replace with old work two gang. Run a new line up the wall, through the top plate into ...


0

If I understand your question correctly - let me verify that first. You have one switch controlling two outlets. You want to add a ceiling fan. It's not quite clear whether your ceiling fan is to also be controlled by the switch, but at this point that's pretty moot. You currently have 14-2 supplying power to the first outlet box, where it breaks out into ...


0

If you are adding a new ceiling fan with a light and currently only have switched outlets in that room ( I am assuming that you are installing a fan rated box properly supported in the ceiling) the outlets no longer need to be switched. At the outlet in your drawing you can remove the color markings from the White in the switch loop and re connect them white ...


1

One red wire on one screw, right? And two black wires under the other screw (or poked into those dang quick-connect holes I hate so much)? If so, that's an ordinary switch, not a three-way. If it actually has three screws on the body of the switch, though, it's a three-way... and given your description of things, there's no really good reason for that. If ...


0

Check the wiring carefully to make sure that the neutral is not switched by the dimmer and the hot run continuous to the fixtures. I was just looking at the type of dimmer you have. Very few good reviews on this product.


1

I can't find any information about the Superswitch 2701 touch dimmer but from the name alone I'm going to make this guess. It sounds like the dimmer uses some electricity to operate. And in order to do this, is just lets some current pass through the switch for it to work. Normally, an incandescent bulb would just let this low current pass through it ...


-1

Your dimmer needs to be adjusted. Check the manual that came with it for instructions. This is usually accomplished by turning an adjustment screw somewhere.


0

When you turn them OFF (switch physically off) or when you turn the dimmer down to minimum? That's an important distinction. The dimmer may always allow some small current through it. If you're getting some small but distinct glow when the power switch is turned off, though, you're getting some sort of parasitic power or drain from SOMEWHERE. I'd suspect ...


3

Commment converted to answer. My guess is that it's an illuminated cover, which no longer works. Turn power off, disconnect the two wires to the cover, and replace with a regular cover. While you're at it, you might as well replace the switch.


2

All AC switches in home wiring have at least two hot leads. These may be in the form of terminals on the switch (either screw, push-in connections, or both), or wires permanently attached to the switch. The most common switches are: Basic switch (SPST) [old] The simplist switch, in the pre-ground days had just two terminals hot in hot out The wires to ...


3

Switches normally just "make or break" the hot lead. Neutral conductors should never be connected to switches except for PIR wall switches and many wall timers. They need to have a neutral connector. So you should have: 1) constant live hot wire (normally black in USA, but you never know without testing) 2) switched hot wire that delivers switched power ...


0

The metal casing of the iPod caused the power strip to short out. The breaker did it's job in tripping when it sensed two much current on the line. The iPod might live, might not. But it is safe to see if it does. The power strip, even it if works, is dead. Throw it out. The circuit should be safe to turn back on. I say should, because if was wired ...


1

I would suspect your daughters iPod charging port has shorted. It is not uncommon, and a known issue with late model 4-5 phones and pods, but heavily denied by Apple. While her room's circuit is off, unplug the iPod and power strip. Then turn the circuit on and test it out with something that is known to work well, a lamp, or if you want something to pull ...


1

Toss the power strip and turn the breaker back on - you'll almost certainly be fine. The circuit breaker did its job by tripping, and you can reasonably expect it to do the same thing if you get another short or arc fault. When you replace the power strip itself, make sure that the one you get has its own over-current protection.


0

Some more options: Attach a receptacle box extender to the switch box. Find some wood the same thickness as the tile+backer (you say one inch). Fiberboard may be a good option as it won't splinter or split. Cut it larger than the area needed under the face plate, router a roundover or other edge shape on the three exposed edges. Cut an opening for the ...


1

There are only three options: Move the light switch. Install the tile differently. Live with it. The first and second options require additional tile work and possibly work to the gypsum board and the electrical system.



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