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If the breaker pops when you turn on a specific burner, even if the cartridge is not plugged in, chances are that burner control switch has gone bad. The power on those units goes through the four burner controls before going out to the cartridge sockets. I had one that if turned on to any setting, would just run the burner on high. If you can depower the ...


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I figured it out after opening it up. The old switches the previous owner installed were actually upside down and the common terminal was in the wrong spot, so when I tired them up the same way the hot was only being properly fed by one switch and when that switch was off the other switch wouldnt work. Once I figured out that that was the problem it was an ...


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Assuming your switches are similar to the Leviton 1463 (wiring diagram taken from their site): there is a resistive bridge between the two travellers that is tapped to feed one end of the pilot light, with the other end connected to the common terminal. When you put two of these in circuit and put the switches in opposite positions, the net effect is ...


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In a three wire switch circuit only one of them has a hot feed. That should be the one that lights up. Apparently, the three wire illuminated switches take the power for the lighted switch from the common not the two travelers. Good luck!


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On 3-ways, the two gold terminals are the travelers. The one black by itself is a "hot" if you will. On one switch, this hot needs to be attached to power. The other will go to the light hot (black) wire. In your switch box, it looks like what was your neutral is not used. The circuit neutral is picked up in the light box. You need to get that neutral to ...


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I think you misunderstand the design of the switch in the circuit. A single pole switch in a circuit just makes or breaks a single wire. When it is off, one of the wires is a hot feed from the main panel and the other goes to the light. When you turn it on, it connects the two together and acts as if the wire was one continuous wire. That is why there is no ...


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From your description it sounds like you have the intelligence to understand this stuff, but are simply lacking certain nuggets of information. You'll want to read up a lot on "switch loops" and particularly "3-way switches". It will all make sense pretty quickly, then. Oh, and one more thing that's a bit harder to uncover: In America, wire colors do ...


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Just because a wire is white doesn't mean it is being used as a neutral especially in an old house. ( I can't tell exactly from your pictures but in the top picture if you have a black, red, and white all attached to a switch then the white wire is most likely a traveler not a neutral. It should be re-identified black, red, or blue.) 3 wire cable in ...


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Call a licensed electrician. How GFCI's work... https://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/118853/099.pdf


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Sounds like a commonplace switch arrangement to me, the kind where the power comes to the switch and then to the lamp. This is the simplest type (in tems of understanding it) where hot+neutral come first to the switch, hot is switched, then switched-hot+neutral proceed to the lamp. Yellow is rarely seen in residential wiring. I think they are actually ...


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I've come across a scenario in which this feature might actually improve safety: Some older European buildings still have TN-C wiring in place. Current wiring codes no longer allow this due to safety concerns (which I'll get to in a minute), but there is no requirement to upgrade as long as no modifications are made (simple replacements, such as installing ...


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Just to point out the other solution: Any the new fixture as a swag lamp, surface-mounted with a decorative treatment bringing the power cord across the ceiling and down to an outlet. That's how my living room is currently lit. Or do a fake coffered/beamed ceiling, running the wire through the "beams".


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The octagon ceiling box looks fine provided you change nothing. All whites are neutral and all blacks and reds are always-hot, except the bulb lead which is a switched hot. Of course you can reactivate the 3-way. The only issues you get into are Code related, as well as the question "Why exactly did the previous owner abandon it?" You may end up ...


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I think you want to leave the kitchen box alone and rewire the 2-gang box like this. I used blue for the white neutral wires: I followed the color scheme of the existing wiring, with the red carrying unswitched hot in the 3-wire cables. Please remember to mark the white traveler with black tape or paint. You can re-use the duplex you have, but you might ...


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That part on the left can't be right. If you closed the sink light switch it would trip the breaker. That is a dead short from hot to neutral. The black tape is not a mistake. That should be the feed to the switch and the black is the switch leg that returns to the light. Then the light is connected to the neutral with the others. The black wire to the 2 ...


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Green in house wiring is always ground, White is neutral. Hot is usually black or red but can be many other colors. The green wire goes to the bare copper ground. The white goes to white the neutral. Now the question is what black wire is hot, The black that is connected to both switches is the line side or hot leg. The switched leg is the black on the other ...


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If the kitchen light(s) are tripping the GFCI then there is a problem in one of the lights. They should work just fine on GFCI whether connected to 3-ways or not. Do not ignore the problem. Track it down and repair it. The reason GFCI's or circuit breakers trip is because something is broke (technical term). This is your first sign of a problem. Ignore it ...


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The kitchen light has a ground fault. That's why it trips the GFCI. It may not have anything to do with being a 3-way switch. Good chance somebody did something dumb in the wiring, like use the ground as the neutral return for that light (maybe they didn't have enough wires, what with all the messenger wires). You might want to look into that. The ...


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It is possible for the 3-way switches to run on the load side, but I wouldn't recommend it. The way a GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupted) receptacle (outlet) works is by tripping when there is a ground fault. If the outlet is tripping for one there is a short to ground making the outlet, and everything after that outlet lose power. I would ...



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