New answers tagged

1

If I understand your description, here is one way to alter your wiring: Basically you use the existing white wires to extend the neutral node everywhere. Use the black wires to extend the unswitched hot all the way to the Zwave. Use the red wire in the third leg to bring the switched hot back to the first two lamps, which have their hot sides connected ...


0

If your wiring is connected as shown in the first picture then you will not be able to put the Zwave switch in the right hand box. The reason being that there is no neutral in that box. To be able to use the Zwave switch you would need to add another Romex cable run from the right switch box up to the light box where the neutral is present. You could either ...


3

I have recently had issues with different electrical appliances ... Having the outlets very low down must put a strain on the leads where they enter the plug. Other than that any suspected problems with the electrical supply need to be discussed with the supplier. / light bulb ... Incandescent bulbs tend to fail when there is problems with the ...


3

Maybe the reason J Box 1 and J Box 2 were empty is that the previous owner gave up trying to get it to work. If so, this would indicate the problem is in the cables. If J Box 2 is in a position where a light would be installed, then the circuit was most likely originally intended to be wired like this: (Put black tape or black paint on the ends of the ...


1

OK here's what I see. Imagine Junction box 2 did not exist. Go back into in Paint, select the white brush and remove everything relating to Junction box 2 including the 3 wires. That looks like a common two-switch configuration using two 3-way switches and the lamp in the middle. You should have found that on any of your web searches. Black and red are ...


3

I need a little more information on the wiring to give an answer. Typically the white neutral wire is bonded to ground, but only at the panel. If this is a switch box, the white wire could be bringing power to the box or returning power back to a light/outlet/switchable device. Essentially, power has to feed "into" the switch with one wire and back "out" ...


2

Neutral (white) doesn't go anywhere on a plain old fashioned switch. It is used by smart switches. Based on the way the house is wired... If the switch is "on the way" to the light, then the neutral passes through the switch on its way to the light... that is to say, it is spliced to another white wire, probably with a wire nut. If the switch is on ...


0

I think you have a hot-neutral reversal somewhere. You don't show it, but I'm going to assume that you have a ground wire in there somewhere. If you have a multimeter, the voltage between white and ground should be 0 (or almost 0, a couple of volts at most). If not, then you need to take apart all of the connections in the circuit and test each one to figure ...


2

As TFK mentioned, this is likely not going to be an easy task. It will surely require installing new wiring, and modifying the existing wiring. However, you have not provided anywhere near the detail required, for somebody on the other side of the internet to tell you how to do it. If you're not experienced with electrical work, you're likely going to have ...


2

There are too many unknowns here for us to help you out. We don't know which switches you intend to use afterwards (locations), what access you have to joining the circuits together, or what the possibilities of joining them would be without knowing of your personal setup. Your setup, roughly as described to us is... <--- S --- S --- Kitchen Lights ...


1

Unfortunately, your 3-way switch install isn't compatible with Z-wave switches -- even if a 3-way Z-wave switch existed, all the Z-wave devices I know of require a neutral to function, and you don't have that. Instead, you have an old-style switch loop where the white wire is retagged to be a traveler, hot, or switched hot instead of a neutral.


3

Assume we have 6 switches (S1-S6) and 5 lamps (L1-L5) -- also assume that we don't want any lights in the stairs on when the stairs are not in use by anyone (even if there's someone on top of the tower), and that someone walking up the final flight of stairs doesn't want the light below them on. Finally, we can assume that nobody's flipping light switches ...


-2

Based on what you've provided, I made this diagram to go along with what all you will need for the new installation and how to accomplish it. This is the only working solution without first running a new neutral from the existing light down to the existing switch. You will have to pull power from the light, not from the switch. Also, as you had mentioned, ...


2

If the wall switch only has 2 wires, it is called a switch loop. The closet light and switch cannot be extended from the current switch. The closet switch and light need a neutral, and that seems to end at the lighting fixture. If you can run a two wire cable from the fixture to the closet switch and then to the closet fixture, the setup is simple: Connect ...


2

I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


4

As Wolf says, a combination of SPDT and DPDT switches. One switch on each floor, top and bottom are SPDT, all others are DPDT. The number of switches is one more than the number of lights. Here are a couple of ways to wire it: The left diagram shows the sane way. Blue is the neutral leg. The right diagram shows how to use the Carter three-way pattern to ...


0

Rephrasing the question a little "the vents doors cant all be closed...if the AC is powered". So you add a fifth switch (which is just a relay) that either opens one door if the AC is powered, or turns off the AC if all doors are closed.


0

Sounds like 3-way switches. Two of them, ganged together so they throw on the same physical switch handle. It's like a single 3-way is SPDT, 2 ganged 3-ways is DPDT. So, 1st floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 2nd floor. 2nd floor lighting controlled by 1st floor and 3rd floor. 3rd floor: 2nd and 4th. Etc.


3

The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


5

For that many locations, I'd strongly consider one of the types of switches intended for home automation applications. One switch would actually control the pump, and the others would signal that switch to turn on or off. Some of them offer battery operated remotes that can be used without any permanent wiring, or you can mount a switch in a normal ...


0

If the blower is continuously blowing, then one of the limit switches is open. It may not be the high limit, but it's certainly one of them. Without knowing more about the unit (model number, photo of the schematic, etc.), it's difficult to offer much more assistance.


8

This is commonly used in industrial controls: I've drawn it as a ladder diagram because I think it's easier to see the individual circuits and the interactions between them. You can translate from that to the actual wiring. I'm using a second relay contact to power the load so that the control circuit only has to handle the relay, which is almost ...


1

First, just to prevent any confusion, it's a "3-way" switch setup, not 2-way. 3-way switches take power in (or let it out) through a singular wire, which then is switched between two 'traveler' wires. It's referred to as a 3-way switch for the same reason as a 3-way intersection - there are 3 paths in/out of the switch. Next, you need to ensure that the ...


11

Yes, you use 4-way switches. Here is an animation that shows how they work. You can have as many 4-way switches as you want, in the middle. http://users.wfu.edu/matthews/misc/switches/4WayAnimation.html Changing the switch causes the pump to change. If it was on, it will be off, or vice versa. The switch position will not tell the user whether it's on ...


14

Yes, the first switch in the circuit from the panel would be a three-way switch. The last switch in the circuit before the pump would also be a three-way switch. Then the other 10 switches would all be four-way switches.


1

Yes, that should be very straightforward. Simply wire the switch to interrupt the "W" wire, which is the one the thermostat uses to ask for heat. Its request will be unanswered obviously. Do this between the thermostat and what I presume is a big relay with a 24v coil that switches the 240v power on to the heaters. Turn the 240v off at the breakers ...


1

Simply move it further towards the right on the wall (closer to the door) so that it clears the meter and you're good. The clear space required is... Depth: 36" [NEC 2014 110.26(A)(1)] In front of the box. As long as you're over to the right far enough that the meter isn't directly in front of the left corner of the transfer enclosure, you're clear. ...


0

Yes, it is possible and relatively easy since it is all low voltage and simple circuitry. If you have multiple heat zones, you need to be sure you have the termostat controlling the basement zone. If you have one heat zone for the whole house, just set up the thermostat in parallel with the other thermostat(s) in the house. Note, you might want to use a ...


1

I think your location may have more than 1 issue. Normally the maximum height is 6-1/2’. The door on the transfer switch must be able to be opened to 90 Degrees. The space in front of the opening usually requires 36”. These requirements are in the NEC 110.26(a)(1), 110.26.2 & 110.26.3.


0

It looks like cable C is not what you think it is, or is shorted between black and white somewhere. If your house had been wired by a sane electrician I would advise searching out the short in the C branch. Of course this is just a wild guess -- but given the context it's possible that the switch on the C branch was changed to control half of the outlet. ...


2

First, your illustrations are Mad Awesome. You could illustrate electrical books. Literally. You might even talk to Mike Holt or others doing electrical docs. That said, it appears to me you are trying to stretch the limits of a little knowledge. That's a mistake. In fact it's the mistake that caused the last guy to do such terrible work. Stop doing ...


0

What it sound like you may have is a 1/2 switched outlet, this is done a lot in house. You are going to need to check line C (the switch) for continuity with a meter. First turn off the breaker that controls that area. Second check the switch, with a meter or non contact voltage tester, that the power is off. Third, knowing that the power is off, turn on ...


0

From your description the wiring is normal not "jerry rigged". You can add a new wire to the switch but from the wire count you may not be able to fit everything back in the box and your wire fill would exceed code. It may be better to purchase a 2 gang old work box cut the hole the right size for the box pull the old box and install the new 2 gang box. It ...


-3

Destroy the iPod, immediately. It severely threatens the life and safety of all people around it by creating electrical faults. Destroy it at once, before it KILLS YOUR DAUGHTER or someone else!


3

Based on your description, this would be the wiring setup. The yellow 'smudges' are wire nuts and the black ones are re-identified wires, grounds are not shown. Power coming in with /2, feeding down to the switch box with /3, and then going over to the secondary light with /2. I'm only showing this based on perhaps if you're trying to reuse existing wiring ...


0

I assume you want to control both fixtures separately, since you said "2 gang switches". Not with a single 14/3, you can't. A 12/4 would do the job. Leaving grounds and neutrals out of the discussion: you need a black for your always-hot down to the switches, the red for the switched hot back to fixture #1. To control fixture #2, you need a third "hot" ...


0

To answer A.I. Breveleri's question, I wanted the switch to turn the five lights in the chandelier on my front porch anti-clockwise in a strobe effect if a politician knocked on my door, gently turn on when I can home late at night and play jingle bells at Christmas. Maybe I'm asking too much. LOL! Seriously, the wiring in my house is nothing like that ...


0

I'll split it up below into three pieces: wiring at the switch box, wiring at the above sink light (at least with it being second in line), and wiring at the fan/light unit in the ceiling. The grey wire throughout is the neutral, the yellow boxes are wire nuts (you'll need more than shown to splice the hots and grounds at each box), and the ground wires are ...


1

You should follow the instructions included with the device. Connect wire "C" of the RPLS530A/RPLS531A to the "common" wire, identified when removing the old switch. Connect the other two RPLS530A/RPLS531A wires to the two remaining wires. At the other 3-way switch, connect the jumper wire between the "common" screw and the screw where ...


0

For full 3-way functionality: Turn off the circuit, of course Wire the incoming black wire to the C terminal on the timer Wire the outgoing black wire to the 1 terminal on the timer Wire the outgoing red wire to the 2 terminal on the timer Jumper the two black wires in the switch box together


0

Wire it this way if you want the front porch light switch to override the timer and force the lights on:


0

While the partial solution in my earlier answer does provide at least some dimming functionality at a four-way location without replacing the switches at all locations with multi-way communicating dimmers and matching companion devices, it is possible to construct a true four-way dimmer from a single-pole, three-wire (switched/dimmed hot) dimmer and 3 SPDT ...


0

This will work, as long as you don't overstuff the switch box Your proposed scheme will function, electrically speaking. However, there is one Code concern with your scheme: box fill. Single gang boxes are not hard to overfill with wires, and introducing the extra cable into your switch box makes it likely that you will do just that. The simplest fix for ...


2

If it was wired with knob and tube originally, it's possible that the 3 way switch was old enough to be wired as "Carter 3-way": Image from Popular Mechanics, October, 1971 In this setup, the load is switched between H-N (on), H-H (off), N-H (on), and N-N (off). Since the 3 ways have the load on the common terminal, the "travelers" can both test hot. ...



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