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19

The sockets I've been using for the last 15 years have standard screw connection, holes behind that location where the screw pulls a plate against straight stripped wires and the push-in holes. After you've encountered a few burnt sockets from using the push-in connection in the first couple outlets in a daisy chain, you start to realize something. The ...


11

You've probably connected one of the 2 power wires to the incorrect traveler terminal on the switch. This switch can be used as both a standard two-way switch as well as a three-way switch. (A three-way switch is used when there are 2 switches controlling the same device.) In standard two-way arrangement, one of the power wires should be attached to the ...


9

It's probably just a broken switch. My guess would be that the switch contact is worn out to the point that it does not make contact, but jiggling it a bit (by turning off and on again) may solve the problem, at least for a little while. Replacing a light switch is a pretty simple matter for a DIYer. I recommend swapping it out and seeing if that solves ...


6

Let's see if I can draw this all once again... CAVEAT: I'm an electrical engineer, not an electrician. My description of the circuits will be correct, but someone should double-check me on the color-coding conventions. The basic concept of a three-way circuit is that you have two single-pole, double-throw switches hooked up back to back: Switch 1 ...


6

So, the box in the ceiling has two pair coming into it. Two black white pair. One comes from the power source. Think of that one as Line and Neutral. The other one runs to the light switch wherever that is. ( If you open the switch, you should find a black and white on the two screws. ) Therefore, the two black wires are connected and beep your ...


5

Improper Electrical Wiring constitutes a serious life safety hazard. It can be the source of structural fire and potentially fatal shocks. I am not saying that you can't splice a common electrical wall switch into an extension cord. I am saying that it is not a good general practice. Consider Instead Installing a suitable hardwired outlet and wall ...


5

If one switch is overriding the other in a three-way circuit, that usually means one of the switches has been hooked up incorrectly. If you get the common and one of the travellers exchanged, you will see exactly this behavior. Double-check each switch to make sure you know which contacts are the common and the two selectable terminals, and double-check ...


5

It's not that we are afraid of anything. It's that it makes poor business sense to use such a failure prone connection. Thing is, they are just unreliable. It's not that they are unsafe.


4

Commment converted to answer. My guess is that it's an illuminated cover, which no longer works. Turn power off, disconnect the two wires to the cover, and replace with a regular cover. While you're at it, you might as well replace the switch.


4

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


4

They DO pass current through the switch and light at all times - just a few mA. The indicator is wired in parallel to the switch contacts. For most types of bulbs its not enough for the light to turn on. However with modern LED light bulbs these types of switches (as well as dimmers, and home automation switches) that dont use the neutral can cause the ...


4

There doesn't appear to be a grounded (neutral) conductor in the box. Looks like it's a simple switch loop, that somebody tried installing a combination receptacle on. It looks like the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) conductor, and the white wire is a switched ungrounded (hot) conductor. There's no way to add a receptacle here, unless you pull a ...


4

Typically you'd run 14/2 to the vanity, and 14/3 to the fan/light combo. In the switch box, Connect all the grounded (neutral) conductors. Connect all the grounding conductors. Connect the ungrounded (hot) conductor from the vanity to the switch. Connect one of the ungrounded (hot) conductors from the light/fan to the switch. Connect the other ...


4

You have a single pole switch It is wired in a way that lacks quality workmanship, to save a moment's time, and a wirenut The top backstab (i like that much better than push-in) is connected electrically to the top screw. The backstab has almost no contact surface area, and this is the reason that they are frowned upon. So rather than making a pig-tail to ...


4

You've likely just swapped a couple wires, if you even have to do anything. If the fan and light are controlled by simple snap switches, then you don't really have to do anything (other than relearn which switch is which). If you have specialty fan controls and/or dimmers, you'll want to switch things around. In the ceiling box above the fan, there should ...


4

Based on the photograph, I'd say the black wires are feeding voltage from the panel (hot) and carrying the voltage onto another switch or outlet. The red wire is presumably going to the light (load). You need to connect the black wires to one screw of the new switch and the red to the other. Leave the green (ground) screw unconnected. It's generally not ...


4

Pressure Switch I've never seen a "safety cut-off" on a pressure system before, but typically the switching is done by a single box (known as a "pressure switch"). Pretty much all of them (at least from the last ~20 years) look something like this: The large nut is used to control the pressure (both cut-in, and cut-out) and the small one controls the ...


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


3

If there are studs at either end of a two gang switch box, that means they are approximately 4 inches apart. A three gang requires 6 inches. A switch box is usually about 3.5 inches high; with thickness that means turned sideways, it will fit in a dual ganged space. So you have room for 20 switches if you want: (from here)


3

Switches normally just "make or break" the hot lead. Neutral conductors should never be connected to switches except for PIR wall switches and many wall timers. They need to have a neutral connector. So you should have: 1) constant live hot wire (normally black in USA, but you never know without testing) 2) switched hot wire that delivers switched power ...


3

You could leave the switch as-is but then install one of various types of switch guards to prevent accidental switch setting changes. Here are a few examples...


3

Basically you need three 14/3 cables between the two boxes. Wire each pair as a set of 3-way switches. Here is a basic diagram. Just do this for each set of 3-ways. The only difference is that you will need to pigtail three leads onto the incoming feed wire to feed each switch in the first box, and splice all the white wires together since they are all ...


3

Turn off the breaker Remove the face plate. You should find two (usually) black wires on opposite ends of the switch. Remove the switch, and join the two black wires with a wire nut. Turn on the breaker, and test the outlet Put a blank face plate on the (now junction block) Install cabinets Cut a hole in the back of the cabinet to access the junction box. ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


3

If you've replaced most of your lightbulbs with CFL or LED bulbs, they present a more inductive load to your power line than incandescent bulbs. This inductance, usually caused by a power converter inside the bulb, doesn't like it when the switch opens. This inductance will actually force current through the switch as it opens, causing a much larger arc ...


3

If you live in an apartment, then the chance of your neighbor having the same fan is pretty high. Try setting the dip switches on the fan receiver and remote to a new setting. Just make sure they're the same.


3

Most 3-way lighted switches work by adding a light between their line and load terminals: This actually causes a small current to flow through the load (light) -- with incandescent or fluorescent bulbs, it's not enough to actually cause the light to go on. But with your LED blub, it's enough to at least start the bulb. Your potential solutions: Replace ...


3

Not as long as you have at least one switched outlet. There's a difference between outlets and receptacles. In your case the switched outlet is the overhead lights you added. No other provisions are required.


3

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


3

The first step is to read through the user's guide, and make sure it's not in a "test" mode. If after reading the manual it still wasn't working, I'd exchange it for a different unit. If the new unit didn't work, I'd either try a different brand/model, or forget about using an occupancy sensor.



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