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8

This is perfectly normal. One of the two travelers can be hot at all times if the switches are wired correctly. Which traveler is hot depends on the orientation of the switches. That said, you shouldn't touch any wire in a circuit box when the branch is live. If you happened to have provided a better ground path, someone else very well could have been ...


6

Yes, I would replace any switch that is consistently making the "popping" noise. This noise is from sparking of the switch contacts and is a bad thing and could lead to switch failure or even a fire. When choosing a new switch choose one that has a quality snap action to it. Lastly stop teasing the switches by moving them slowly. This is a bad practice ...


5

It's not a switch, for one thing. It's a dimmer - a switch, in the same circumstances, would be just fine with full rated amperage of LED or CFL. Unless you have a great deal of interest in dimming, your best option if you have 200W of LEDs on the circuit would be to use a switch. The limit comes from the interaction of the power supply circuits internal to ...


5

The thermopile in your fireplace puts out millivolts, nothing near the 120V the light switch was designed for. It's probably just a matter of finding a switch with a low enough on resistance. A generic low voltage switch from a electronics store, or ripped out of a toy, would probably do it (for example a 12V SPST). Really here the smaller the better, but ...


5

If one switch is overriding the other in a three-way circuit, that usually means one of the switches has been hooked up incorrectly. If you get the common and one of the travellers exchanged, you will see exactly this behavior. Double-check each switch to make sure you know which contacts are the common and the two selectable terminals, and double-check ...


5

Improper Electrical Wiring constitutes a serious life safety hazard. It can be the source of structural fire and potentially fatal shocks. I am not saying that you can't splice a common electrical wall switch into an extension cord. I am saying that it is not a good general practice. Consider Instead Installing a suitable hardwired outlet and wall ...


4

If your hypothesis is correct, which it most likely is, that the switch controls one of the outlets, then the extra pair of wires in that outlet have to do with the switch. Either they provide a separate loop to control just one half of the outlet (some switched outlets are like that: a switch just controls one of the receptacles out of the pair). Or else ...


4

If it switches the mains power supply to the fence charger, yes, of course. If you are using it to switch the energized fence wire, no of course not - that's generally tens of kilovolts, and far exceeds the rating of the switch.


4

A 2 ways switch should totally do it: wire the common of the switch with the line cable wire one of the switch ways to the bathroom light and the don't walk light wire the other switch way to the walk light wire all lights second wire to the neutral cable if your walk/don't walk sign has a metal frame, wire it to the protective earth cable Just ensure ...


4

It would be easy to change the half switched outlet to always on (by replacing it), but not trivial to make the switch control a different outlet. There is a dedicated wire running from the switch to the top half of your outlet (see red wire below). To control a different outlet, you'd need to run that wire to it.


4

Commment converted to answer. My guess is that it's an illuminated cover, which no longer works. Turn power off, disconnect the two wires to the cover, and replace with a regular cover. While you're at it, you might as well replace the switch.


4

Let's see if I can draw this all once again... CAVEAT: I'm an electrical engineer, not an electrician. My description of the circuits will be correct, but someone should double-check me on the color-coding conventions. The basic concept of a three-way circuit is that you have two single-pole, double-throw switches hooked up back to back: Switch 1 ...


3

I had the same problem, tried everything, replaced the switch and the thermopile, no avail. Then finally I removed the pilot light assembly, the top just pops off and using a straw blew a bunch of dust out of it. The result was a better flame on the thermopile which allowed the valve to open, try that.


3

I've annotated your image... It's not possible from the image to tell which of the wires marked with red is the feeder from the breaker, and which is the feeder to other devices on the circuit. However, since you're simply replacing a switch with a timer, you'll not have to touch these wires anyway. The neutrals can also be ignored, unless you're ...


3

The loop in the black wire is normal when electricians are running a hot wire from device to device. It saves them time and is really safer since it involves fewer wire nuts. The orange wire is the wire that is going to the light. The power enters the switch where the black wire is looped over the screw, and exits to the light through the orange wire. Yes, ...


3

If this is, in fact, a split outlet, you should be fine wire nutting the blacks and a black pigtail, the reds and a red pigtail, and you can connect the whites directly or wirenut them and a pigtail, as you prefer. You will need to break the tab connecting the receptacles on the hot side, at least (my guess is that they broke the hot tab and left the neutral ...


3

It's possible that the switch does power an outlet, but that the installer did not remove the fin that connects the top and bottom outlets. When the fin is removed, the top and bottom outlets are isolated from one another so that they can be independently powered. If the top and bottom outlets are wired with two wires of the same phase, you would not ...


3

You can use the switch to operate both the fan and light, if you so choose. In fact, this is a common feature in single user public restrooms. As long as the switch and wiring are rated for the amount of current, which unless you get a huge fan, it should be. If you have the ability to install a new cable (or pull an extra wire, if the wires happen to be ...


3

Switches normally just "make or break" the hot lead. Neutral conductors should never be connected to switches except for PIR wall switches and many wall timers. They need to have a neutral connector. So you should have: 1) constant live hot wire (normally black in USA, but you never know without testing) 2) switched hot wire that delivers switched power ...


3

The problem is, whenever you turn one set of lights on, power can go through that shared light into the other circuit. So each switch controls all lights. While it -might- be possible to make 2 light groups (1 common light) work the way you want with two 4-way switches back-wired through each other, you're asking for something even more complicated. Each ...


3

If there are studs at either end of a two gang switch box, that means they are approximately 4 inches apart. A three gang requires 6 inches. A switch box is usually about 3.5 inches high; with thickness that means turned sideways, it will fit in a dual ganged space. So you have room for 20 switches if you want: (from here)


2

Pretty simple question that seems to have gotten out of hand. I believe the OP was trying to fix or modify a work bench like this one, pictured. These would be the correct off-the-shelf parts... pretty legit if you ask me. Good luck finding a non-Decora GFCI for it, no wonder they needed a seprate GFCI.


2

The trivial way to do this is to buy an off-the-shelf power strip with a switch and 15A circuit breaker, and plug that into a 15A-or-more GFCI outlet. If you don't want to replace the existing outlet, you can do what I did: Buy a standard 15A 3-prong power cord, a GFCI, a box with an outlet faceplate, and a strain relief. Knock out an appropriate size hole ...


2

I'd use a toner-tracer designed for locating telecommunications wires. Remove each breaker, hook up to the bare wires, and use the tracer to find the first segment. Pull it, and lather rinse repeat to the end of each run. These are also called "fox and hound" units.


2

After receiving help, I realized that the switches were just faulty and my wiring is correct. I did also consult with an electrician who also told me that 1 in 4 of these switches can be dead on arrival. In my case, 3 of the 3 were dead. For some more additional information on the dead switches: Measuring with a multimeter of traveler wire to ground. ...


2

No. You do not have the required conductors at the box. It sounds like you simply have a switch loop, where one conductor is ungrounded (hot), and the other is an ungrounded switched conductor. To power a ceiling fan, you'll also need a grounded (neutral) conductor. If you could pull an additional conductor (or cable) from the power source of the ...


2

I'd start by turning off the power at the breaker, and verifying it's off using a non-contact voltage tester. Remove the cover plate, and remove the screws holding the switch in place. Gently pull the switch out of the box, being careful not to pull too hard. Verify that all the wires are firmly attached, and are not broken or damaged. If nothing looks ...


2

In my previous house I installed an X10 relay to trigger the fireplace from across the room. I never had the switch problem or a problem with the relay.


2

You can purchase a door bell button mounted in a cover plate that is designed to mount on a single gang electrical box. The one I located is sold on-line only through the big orange box's web site. Here is what it looks like:


2

You're looking up parts with the wrong terms. What you want is a transfer switch. You don't need the kind that includes breakers, etc., since you're using an interlock; just a simple transfer switch. In a transfer switch where the neutrals are bonded or overlapped during switching, the advantage is reduced arcing and transients during switching. The ...



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