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12

Yes, the first switch in the circuit from the panel would be a three-way switch. The last switch in the circuit before the pump would also be a three-way switch. Then the other 10 switches would all be four-way switches.


9

Yes, you use 4-way switches. Here is an animation that shows how they work. You can have as many 4-way switches as you want, in the middle. http://users.wfu.edu/matthews/misc/switches/4WayAnimation.html Changing the switch causes the pump to change. If it was on, it will be off, or vice versa. The switch position will not tell the user whether it's on ...


7

This is commonly used in industrial controls: I've drawn it as a ladder diagram because I think it's easier to see the individual circuits and the interactions between them. You can translate from that to the actual wiring. I'm using a second relay contact to power the load so that the control circuit only has to handle the relay, which is almost ...


4

As Wolf says, a combination of SPDT and DPDT switches. One switch on each floor, top and bottom are SPDT, all others are DPDT. The number of switches is one more than the number of lights. Here are a couple of ways to wire it: The left diagram shows the sane way. Blue is the neutral leg. The right diagram shows how to use the Carter three-way pattern to ...


4

For that many locations, I'd strongly consider one of the types of switches intended for home automation applications. One switch would actually control the pump, and the others would signal that switch to turn on or off. Some of them offer battery operated remotes that can be used without any permanent wiring, or you can mount a switch in a normal ...


3

The following assumes that only one switch controls the outlets. Turn the breaker off to the outlets. Confirm there is no power with an outlet tester. Remove the switch cover. Loosen the switch. Confirm there is no power to the switch using a no-contact tester. Remove the two wires attached to the switch (should be a combination of black, red or white). ...


3

Assume we have 6 switches (S1-S6) and 5 lamps (L1-L5) -- also assume that we don't want any lights in the stairs on when the stairs are not in use by anyone (even if there's someone on top of the tower), and that someone walking up the final flight of stairs doesn't want the light below them on. Finally, we can assume that nobody's flipping light switches ...


2

If the wall switch only has 2 wires, it is called a switch loop. The closet light and switch cannot be extended from the current switch. The closet switch and light need a neutral, and that seems to end at the lighting fixture. If you can run a two wire cable from the fixture to the closet switch and then to the closet fixture, the setup is simple: Connect ...


2

I'd first check if someone incorrectly wired a single half switched receptacle. To do this, you're going to need to check the outlets for a hot and then determine how the circuit is run through the walls for the switch. Turn off the switch and check outlets to see if there's still a hot connection anywhere. I'd try with a non-contact tester first, and if ...


1

First, just to prevent any confusion, it's a "3-way" switch setup, not 2-way. 3-way switches take power in (or let it out) through a singular wire, which then is switched between two 'traveler' wires. It's referred to as a 3-way switch for the same reason as a 3-way intersection - there are 3 paths in/out of the switch. Next, you need to ensure that the ...


1

Yes, that should be very straightforward. Simply wire the switch to interrupt the "W" wire, which is the one the thermostat uses to ask for heat. Its request will be unanswered obviously. Do this between the thermostat and what I presume is a big relay with a 24v coil that switches the 240v power on to the heaters. Turn the 240v off at the breakers ...


1

Simply move it further towards the right on the wall (closer to the door) so that it clears the meter and you're good. The clear space required is... Depth: 36" [NEC 2014 110.26(A)(1)] In front of the box. As long as you're over to the right far enough that the meter isn't directly in front of the left corner of the transfer enclosure, you're clear. ...


1

I think your location may have more than 1 issue. Normally the maximum height is 6-1/2’. The door on the transfer switch must be able to be opened to 90 Degrees. The space in front of the opening usually requires 36”. These requirements are in the NEC 110.26(a)(1), 110.26.2 & 110.26.3.


1

Unfortunately, your 3-way switch install isn't compatible with Z-wave switches -- even if a 3-way Z-wave switch existed, all the Z-wave devices I know of require a neutral to function, and you don't have that. Instead, you have an old-style switch loop where the white wire is retagged to be a traveler, hot, or switched hot instead of a neutral.



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