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4

There doesn't appear to be a grounded (neutral) conductor in the box. Looks like it's a simple switch loop, that somebody tried installing a combination receptacle on. It looks like the black wire is an ungrounded (hot) conductor, and the white wire is a switched ungrounded (hot) conductor. There's no way to add a receptacle here, unless you pull a ...


3

Yes you can. You need to replace the current switch with a three way. Run the new three wire cable between the old switch box and the new switch box. The wire that carries current to the old switch is attached to the common terminal of the replacement three way. The wire that brings current to the light in the existing switch box is connected to one of ...


2

Tester is spot on about the lack of a neutral conductor, all you have is a hot and switched, the outlet doesn't have the necessary wiring. You'll need to run another line with a neutral. If that line also contains another hot then you can break off the tab between the two hot screws and wire the bottom with the new hot/neutral. If that hot comes from a ...


1

You would be best advised to shut off all live power feed to this box. Then pull the existing bare copper GND wires out of the back of the box and add an additional bare copper wire pigtail to the bunch. Then reattach to the box with the proper green grounding screw. The new pigtail will get wire nutted to the green wire on your new dimmer switch using an ...


1

The switch must be in a listed and labeled enclosure, or the switch itself must have a built-in enclosure. The switch should also be rated for the voltage, and current, to which it will be subjected. You'll also want to make sure the switch is attached in such a way, that normal use will not rip it from the enclosure. Pull chains can be subjected to a lot ...


1

It sounds like you have power entering the junction box at the light fixture, then running to one of the switches. If you actually have power entering both switch boxes independently, this will never work and you need to look at the connections at the light fixture. EDIT Here's a 3-way switch: Here's what should be happening in your case in order for the ...


1

I had the same problem, intermittent flames, sometimes no response no matter how long I leave the switch to on position. Thanks to the knowledge here I measured the voltage on the wire and it was 320 millivolts. So I cleaned the contacts and the wire and reassembled the switch. Voila, works perfectly now. Thanks everybody. Just a little sandpaper on the ...


1

Does anyone know what voltage a "healthy" thermopile produces? A little Googling does not give me a clear answer; I've seen everything from 30mV to 750mV, but I am leaning towards 750mV being the correct answer. I have the problem described in this thread and my thermopile is producing 300mV DC from the pilot light, measured at the switch. I've taken an AA ...



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