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4

Your problem is that you have looped/paralleled the neutral (white) wire both through and around the 3-way switches, which can be interpreted as a NEC 300.3(B)/310.10(H) violation. What I would do instead is run a 14/4 between the two 3-way switches, with black as the unswitched hot and red and blue as the travelers, then run a 14/3 from the 2nd switch box ...


3

You have confirmed my suspicion that, with the switch off, the outlet and the light are in series. That is the reason that both light dim when a 100 watt light is plugged in. The fact that the outlet shows hot/neutral reversed when the switch is off tells me exactly what the "electrician" did. The outlet must be wired as follows: the hot side of the ...


3

You need a "switch dummy". Also commonly called a "switch blank", "blank insert" and "blank filler". The big box stores may not carry this item, if not, electrical supply house should have available.


3

You have a 2-way switch. One of the black wires is probably the line and the other carries power to some other device on the circuit; they are connected together by one using the backstab connector and the other the screw. The red wire is probably the load (it's also possible the red is the line and you have two loads controlled by the switch).


2

Different devices have different characteristics when the timer breaks the circuit. They usually rate the contacts of the timer by resistive (tungsten) or inductive (motor) style loads. Even though the contacts are rated for 20 amps a resistive load may be more likely to pit the contacts so they derate the timer for a resistive load. Good luck! EDIT - ...


2

I figured it out after opening it up. The old switches the previous owner installed were actually upside down and the common terminal was in the wrong spot, so when I tired them up the same way the hot was only being properly fed by one switch and when that switch was off the other switch wouldnt work. Once I figured out that that was the problem it was an ...


2

Possibly. They do make gadgets designed to control a ceiling fan + light separately, using wiring meant for a light only (which is your case even though it's a fan only). They include a control module which goes behind the fan shroud, and an intelligent light switch. The module doesn't care if the fan and light are separate items. They also make lights ...


1

Just use outlet box #1 as both a junction box & outlet box. Having enough room in the box shouldn't be a problem, but you can always get a deeper box if desired. Wire nut the supply to another 14/2 running to the switch. Then, you'll run a new 14/2 back to outlet box #1 to power the outlet. Finally, simply run another 14/2 from outlet #1 to outlet #2. ...


1

Open up the switch box, and have a look how it's wired. Without more information (photos, diagrams, etc.), the following information is an educated guess. One of the colored lines (red, black) is likely always hot, while the other is controlled by the switch. The white is most probably neutral, and the bare/green is almost certainly ground. If this is the ...


1

Assuming your switches are similar to the Leviton 1463 (wiring diagram taken from their site): there is a resistive bridge between the two travellers that is tapped to feed one end of the pilot light, with the other end connected to the common terminal. When you put two of these in circuit and put the switches in opposite positions, the net effect is ...


1

Perhaps I could be wrong on this but when I worked as an electrician in California many years ago, the coast 3 way switching was developed for the following reason. Many homes and offices were wired using steel flex (aluminum came later). Most cities in California at that time had their own electrical code, governed to some degree by the state code and NEC. ...



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