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3

Not really. Your option is pretty much replace the switch with a quieter one. Switches are $2 to $5. Since SE archives questions, I'll mention that some switches are loud because they are special switches rated to switch high current - in that case, don't downgrade.


3

I believe that you have mixed up the light-hot and the panel-hot wires. So when you flip the first switch it supplies power to the (whole) switch. You need to move the light wire (yellow in the picture below) and put it on the brass screw corresponding to the one you thought was the light wire. The wire that you thought went to the light is the power/panel ...


3

Anyone able to point me in the right direction as to what wiring i have here? Red - permanent-live feed from lighting circuit (240V AC) Black with red sleeve - switched-live from switch (to luminaire). Green - earth to metal backbox. Yellow - earth from metal backbox to metal body of dimmer - no longer needed, remove. A typical UK light switch will ...


3

Single Pole Switch Diagram Turn power off at electrical panel by turning off the breaker. Connect the two black wires as shown. Connect the ground bare wire to the green screw making a clockwise hook so the ground is nice and secure. And tighten. When you push the switch in make sure the ground is tuck back out of the way as to avoid any problems from ...


2

Just use outlet box #1 as both a junction box & outlet box. Having enough room in the box shouldn't be a problem, but you can always get a deeper box if desired. Wire nut the supply to another 14/2 running to the switch. Then, you'll run a new 14/2 back to outlet box #1 to power the outlet. Finally, simply run another 14/2 from outlet #1 to outlet #2. ...


2

Look closely at that light switch. See the two switch blocks (one blank) and the almost-square translucent fringe around both of them? That lights up. That is a backlight designed to help you find it in the dark. You may have known this and forgot to mention it, or maybe it doesn't work for a particular reason. Here is how those switches are wired ...


2

If the power enters at the first receptacle outlet, then you can wire it as follows: At the receptacle outlet box 14/2 feed into the receptacle outlet box. 14/3 between the receptacle outlet box and the other outlet box. Connect white wire from 14/2 feed to the silver screw on the receptacle, and the white wire from the 14/3 cable going to the other box. ...


2

You're over-thinking this. Get a replacement plug from the hardware store. Disconnect the "downstream" lights and put the plug on to that wire. Then use an extension cord.


2

Rejoice in the conduit. It makes modifications easy - for instance if you ever install a smart switch that needs neutral, you can just add a neutral. You only think of white and black because those are the colors in Romex. Since you're in conduit, that's not a factor. It's a mark of quality for an electrician to use a multitude of colors in an apparent ...


2

First off -- the only guarantees found in North American electrical code are that neutrals are white or grey (but not all whites are neutral) and grounds are green, green/yellow striped, or bare. Things that are neither ground nor neutral can be any other color -- the reason black, red, and to a lesser extent blue are common is because those colors are what ...


1

This looks like a 3-way slide dimmer. In the first picture it looks like there are five wires. Two black, two blue and one white(?). Is that correct? Can't tell what the white(s) is(are) connected to, if at all. Just looking at the pictures(which are leaving out some needed information) and seeing that these are 4-square boxes, the box in the second ...


1

Never gonna work. Take the dimmer back and get the right thing. It won't be the first one the shop has taken back for that reason. But, know this -- a dimmer switch that works with an old-style 3-way** is a hard problem. The device that can solve it is sophisticated. Basically it has to be able to power itself off either of the two travelers, supply ...


1

Yes, no, and pigtail a ground from the other two. To clarify, the black wires are a hot from the panel and an outgoing hot to the light loop (which comes back as the neutral in the same cable). The switch simply breaks that loop, and you can connect a typical switch in either configuration. Older switches didn't have ground screws, but now it's standard ...


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[much better answer by Tester101. Will delete this answer tomorrow once OP has a chance to see redirection]


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It's illegal as per the NEC to have a bathroom circuit leave the bathroom unless it's to anther bathroom outlet, and then it can only carry the GFCI's in multiple bathrooms.... No lights or any other uses, so this discussion is starting off badly and will end badly if you ignore the electrical codes



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