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4

Based on the photograph, I'd say the black wires are feeding voltage from the panel (hot) and carrying the voltage onto another switch or outlet. The red wire is presumably going to the light (load). You need to connect the black wires to one screw of the new switch and the red to the other. Leave the green (ground) screw unconnected. It's generally not ...


4

You've likely just swapped a couple wires, if you even have to do anything. If the fan and light are controlled by simple snap switches, then you don't really have to do anything (other than relearn which switch is which). If you have specialty fan controls and/or dimmers, you'll want to switch things around. In the ceiling box above the fan, there should ...


3

Orision, My take on this is that you understand what you want pretty well, and understand electricity only at a very surface level. That's not a great mix. My suggestion would be for you to do some googling on home automation products and see if you can come up with a way to set up a system that accomplishes this with off the shelf home automation products ...


1

Be careful when reading residential voltage with a DVM meter. My Fluke will read 121VAC at a single pole switch with the switch On, and 50vac with it off. But the scale changes from V to mv (milivolts). The scale changes dynamically and the v in milivolts on my Fluke is very small. 50-60mv is typical voltage float on ground. I have never measured a true ...


1

You are describing a 3-way switch, which is among the most cheap and common electrical elements you will find. You can pay up a bit for a 3-way switch with "pilot light" which will illuminate the switch when the circuit is closed (or open, depending on how wired), so that users will know whether toggling the switch will be turning the receptacle on or off. ...


1

From your question it sounds like you have a series of fixtures, some between the two switches and some past one of the switches. The key to a successful 3-way switch setup is maintaining the two traveler conductors between the two switches and then choosing one of the two switches as the "in" and the other as the "out". Usually the "close" switch (the ...



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