Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


1

There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


1

GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


1

Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...


1

As others have suggested, you should conduct a risk assessment and consider the likelihood and severity of a flood or other fault condition. Another option I've not seen suggested is to install a float or level switch connected to an alarm sounder/beacon which would indicate a rising level and potentially warning of a pump failure. A friend of mine did ...


1

Most pump failures that I hear about are due to one of several causes. The pump runs on a regular basis due to poor drainage, high water table etc. Eventually it wears out and fails. Usually it fails in the middle of a flood. On other occasions it cycles very infrequently and it corrodes due to it being in a humid/damp sump well and rarely running. The other ...


0

If you frequently have power outages, a redundant system could well be worth the cost. This is especially true since power outages are common during storms, which could be a cause of rising waters. If you do get a redundant system, you'll want to get one that doesn't rely on the same power source as the primary. So you'll want a battery, or water powered ...


1

Only you can answer if it's "worth it". I would imagine if it did flood, the damage would be more than $400 and you'd be kicking yourself that you didn't spend that $400. If you die at 100 years old and it never flooded, I guess then you could say it wasn't worth it.



Top 50 recent answers are included