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If it ain't broke, don't fix it. The pump is likely plugged into a single receptacle on a dedicated circuit, because there used to be an exception in the code that allowed a setup like that to avoid GFCI protection. It's possible that the pump will not play well with the GFCI, and then you'll be up shits creek (literally). It's quite possible that the ...


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There should be no technical problem just replacing both outlets with GFCI units. For end of circuit branch they install pretty much just like a regular outlet. Just make sure to connect the wires in electrical box to the "LINE" terminals of the GFCI unit. When purchasing the GFCI units keep a lookout for the newer lower profile types that use up less back ...


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GFCI is not required for dedicated circuits when a nuisance trip would be unfortunate - usages such as freezers or sump pumps. So, I would not put a GFCI on those circuits. They must, however, not have outlets that other appliances could be plugged into. The ejector pump is okay, but the sump pump does not conform to code, as it has another outlet. Two ...


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Current code leans to GFCI the heck out of it, and if it nusiance trips or fails (as they do with some regularity; typically about 10 years) and backs up sewage or water, tough noogies. People who sell GFCIs write the codes, and they have been expanding places where GFCIs are required for years. As of 2002 code (at least) there was still an exception for ...



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