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Nothing beats a steel stud. Fire Proof, rot, mold mildew resistant and strength. In a basement, underground steel all the way. Steel can be cheaper, and is straight as an arrow. It is lighter, but residential grade steel studs are very flimsy and can have that office tinny feel. The higher gauge studs are more sturdy, but are more expensive, heavier, and ...


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Look for studs at 4 foot marks from one or the other outside corner. These are often edges of plywood sheathing and are important for the framers layout to hit. Other studs can be off or shifted due to plumbing or structural issues. Once you find one of the 4' breaks you might be able to find studs on 16" centers from there.


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Option 1: Measure 15 1/4 inches minus the thickness of the drywall (or panell etc.) from another exterior wall. If that misses, measure 23 1/4 inches minus the drywall. If that misses, go to the other side and measure from the opposite wall. Option 2: locate an outlet. A stud will (probably) be on one side or the other. Option 3: read more on How do I ...


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I have used wet rags / towels and a heat gun if I take two long in making bent wood "butcher block" counter tops. With bad 2x4" I will use them in shorter pieces for fire blocks (ok now 2x6) or find other uses because if not dried straight they may twist again if only anchored at top and bottom in a wall. If you have a large number I did see 1 contractor ...


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If the 2x4 is not too twisted, then you can probably just use a clamp or a block. Start by fastening one end of the stud in place, and then use one nail to fasten the other end. The nail should be placed such that one of the edges of the stud is centered (as it should be). The other edge (lets call it edge B) will not be on center until a clamp or block is ...


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Use a long small (1/8" or smaller) drill bit and go under the house, drill up through the floor as close as you can get to the floor beam. Go in the house and locate the drill bit, now you know where the floor beam is and the very small hole is negligible. I also use this method in my sheet rock ceiling to locate the ceiling walls in the attic.


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A photo would help us narrow down possible solutions, but the bottom line is that you must have at least two solid anchor points. I find it hard to believe that you don't have studs at least on 24" centers. It could be that you're hitting the floor system, but that probably just means that you have solid backing in a horizontal orientation. If you can't ...


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It sounds like you may have metal studs. That would explain the difficulty drilling through, followed by the void beyond.


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What you used originally is what it used every day by professionals, handymen and DIYers alike. A drywall gun with fine thread drywall screws. For heavier studs drill-point drywall screws can be used. If what you did works for you then keep at it. It's just a lot slower than a drywall gun. So if this is just for you and small projects there is nothing wrong ...



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