Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Another alternative is to build out one side of the wall that is away from the brace side. For example you could attach 2x2s to the edge of each stud to open up the wall cavity to another 1.5". This actually removes only a small amount of finished space in the room. If done all the way across one wall surface you would probably hardly realize that that one ...


1

One thing you could look into would be flat oval ducting: You can get it as small as 3" in the smaller dimension, but it will likely be a lot harder to find and a lot more expensive. Also, it will compound the issue @iLikeDirt pointed out in keeping it clean, especially if you have transitions to round pipe anywhere. I would also limit yourself to one ...


1

I definitely agree with iLikeDirt, but if you have no choice you can use oval duct such as this: http://www.deflecto.com/products/pc/Skinny-Duct-Aluminum-Dryer-Vent-br-4-Oval-Duct-Adjustable-27-48-4p445.htm If anything, as a safety precaution you should foil tape ALL joints and even elbows. I do this as standard even for exposed duct work. DO NOT use ...


2

I wouldn't build it that way in the first place. Hiding a dryer duct within a wall and venting it through the roof (I'm guessing here, but that's what it looks like to me) is just begging for nobody to clean it until it eventually catches fire and burns the house down. I recently re-did my utility room and discovered an in-wall rigid steel duct just like ...


0

If you are concerned about the weight an easy solution is to put a sheet of plywood (or nicer wood, if it will still be visible once the TV is in place) across 3 studs. Secure it with 2 screws into each stud. Then screw the wall mount into the wood. Doing it this way will definitely support the weight of any TV you might try to mount. And allows you to ...


3

I would knock that sucker out with impunity. If it is to serve some purpose, it most likely would not be code compliant. Fire blocking is the first thing that comes to mind, but it is only in one stud section.


0

You are most likely referring to Cross bridging or blocking. They must be installed to keep the joists from twisting.


0

For USA jobs, the national electric code mandates a minimum of 1 1/4" from the edge of the wood to the cable (reference NEC Section 300-4). In other words, if your screw mounts less than about an inch into the wood, and the wire was installed correctly, you're fine. I'd recommend using a bracket with a series of shorter screws rather than one big one. ...


1

If the mounting hardware would hit a cable, you need only move the mirror a few inches to avoid it. Cut a small hole in the drywall / plaster and look in the wall. See where the cables go and hang the mirror in a way that doesn't hurt them. Cut the hole in a place that the mirror will cover, and you don't need to worry about doing a good repair job on it. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included