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11

You can do all of this using weatherproof boxes and conduit especially if you are not opposed to having conduit visible. It will only require a single 3/4" hole through the wall. Supplies: 1-gang rectangular weatherproof box. round weatherproof box. 1-gang In-use cover. 3/4" PVC conduit. 3/4" male terminal adapters 3/4" PVC conduit clamps. ...


5

The mold and mildew won't "go away" but if it gets no more moisture, it will die off and not cause any further damage. However, in my book it is NEVER acceptable to just cover up the damage to make it look good. That's the lazy I don't give a ** way of doing things.


5

Based on other Googling, I found I had two choices: big holes through the stucco, plugged with silicone caulk and screw anchors (if I needed to hang something heavy, I definitely would go that route) or Loctite Stik'n'Seal Outdoor Adhesive. So I Stuck'n'Sealed 'em. Note to anyone who goes this route: it seems to take FOREVER for the glue to set! If I had ...


4

That looks like a good justification for a phone call to the local sandblaster. Stucco's too abrasive to be depainted with metal tools.


3

Fastening rigid board by screwing through the stucco into the cladding (or framing) will hold the stucco in place, so its poor condition matters little. Remove any mold or rotted stucco, and remove any organic debris. I wouldn't bother trying to glue to flaking stucco. Additionally, the stucco left in place will continue to provide a moisture, thermal, ...


2

I recently used DAP All-Purpose Stucco Patch. It comes in a tube too so you can just attach it to your caulking gun. It needs to be painted over. You need to repair those cracks so water does not get in and DAP will seal it along with a coat of paint. You'll need a plastic spreader to spread the mix.


2

If it were my house I'd get painting! Paint is intended to seal hairline cracks of this kind. Depending on your locality you may find that it's feasible to spray a paint finish over stucco, which can be by far the easiest and cheapest way to do it.


2

Since you're going to hang something on it, you're going to make a hole anyway. Just make that hole your test hole, and if you hit wood or brick, it will be pretty obvious with even a small bit. Then get the appropriate bolt/screw for the wall, expand the hole as necessary, and do the install. I'd recommend against checking from the inside since the first ...


2

It is not an acceptable means of repair. You should remove and replace wet, rotted and fungus infected wood. Covering it over is a bad idea. The rot can continue until the wood loses all structural integrity. It sounds like the repair you got was a schlock job.


2

I've used two methods: a silicon like adhesive called "Lexel", and epoxy an elevator bolt to the wall. I prefer these methods to penetrating the stucco, and both methods have been in service for several years. With the adhesive you want to account for expansion by leaving gaps between numbers. With the bolts, hold them in place with tape while the ...


2

It sounds to me like the caulk is meant to prevent water from getting into the wall, not to prevent water from entering the electrical box. To seal the box, you'll want to use a weatherproof cover with a weatherproof gasket. If the box is in an area protected from the weather, you can use a cover that is weatherproof when nothing is plugged in. ...


2

Yes as an exterior (no as an interior). The general rule is that the hardest surface must face the side that water would be attacking from. If you reverse it, any water that penetrates cause a pressure build up when it meets the harder surface and cause the softer material to crack.


2

What's the proper way to seal a exterior surface mounted lamp from water entry? Here's what I ended up doing. I applied a bead of paintable silicone caulk directly to the stucco, tooled it for good adhesion, and smoothed it with a soapy finger. This in essence built up a nearly invisible gasket. The fixture already had a weep hole. Fastening the fixture ...


2

What is mandatory for contractors is suggested for homeowners. Lead dust is what you want to avoid: Manual scraping is much better than power. Hand sanding is much better than power sanders Wet wipe down is much better sweeping dry HEPA vacs are much safer than ordinary shop vacs Common sense stuff: N95 (or better, EPA suggests N or P 100) dust ...


2

I thought I remembered that you had asked questions about other portions of work related to your house. I checked back to it and seen you are prepared to do anything that is going to give the best result, with good reason. Shortcuts can work, and may even give the same look, but if you are going to go through a major renovation, a shortcut can cost in the ...


2

I asked a couple of sandblasters and they all told me that sandblasting off the paint would likely destroy the stucco in the process, so I would probably need a new brown coat and color coat after they were finished. In the end, the cheapest real stucco option (i.e. not just adding another layer pf paint) seemed to be to skip sandblasting and apply wire ...


2

Should I assume that someone skilled at stucco work is also skilled at plaster work? No you should not!


2

You can use any of those materials, or none of those. Waterproof paper (properly installed such that water is prevented from penetrating the repair seams) and wire mesh alone, with no substrate, may be just fine. An important part of the job that you do not mention (and is not apparent in your picture) is the waterproof paper/membrane.


2

The important part is breaking out the old stucco to create a rough edge, and expose the wire to tie into. Sheath what you have with wood. Slip new paper (two layers of grade D in the USA), under the old, and wire. Now an alternative is to cut cement board in the shape of the old window and caulk the edges. But here you'd want to recess the cement board ...


2

A caulk rated for outdoor use should be just fine for this sealing job. If there is any fine particulate in the area left over from drilling through the stucco do brush or blow it away before applying the caulk.


2

The best way is to knock out enough stucco to find the studs, mount a backing plate to the studs, and stucco over that. Now, that's a lot of work, so there are quicker& easier ways. Perhaps you could cut a small plug out of plywood or similar material which press-fits each hole, then do a skim-coat over it to match the stucco. It comes down to ...


1

I think I've answered my own question: I'm going to do the footing insulation first. This will increase the effective thickness of the footings and result in a metal flashing plate over the footing foam at the bottom of the existing walls (for drainage and termite control/visibility). I can use that for the wall project by resting the wall's new foam ...


1

Is there a second floor? You don't really want an extra "vapor barrier" on anything that is (now) an interior surface. And in general you want one and only one vapor barrier: all building spaces need to exchange humidity in at least one direction. Put up two vapor barriers and the space in the middle will have the wrong humidity.


1

1) Yes. It would probably be easier and more cost efficient to simply cover it (drywall, paneling) or fill it in with more stucco (requires more skill). 2) Brick or block. 3) Purchase a TV mounting kit suitable for your make/model TV and use masonry anchors (http://www.doityourself.com/stry/h2anchorconcrete) to mount it. Good luck!


1

What's the proper way to seal a exterior wall mounted luminary from water entry? Caulk it with a high-quality, paintable silicone caulk like this. I have been using this caulk for 8 - 10 years and have never had to re-caulk after applying it.


1

You can do it either way, I would use a corner bead, but use the variety that has expanded metal lathe on the edges too. Although corner could be done "freehand", using the trowel as a guide on one side and scraping the stucco over the edge of the trowel (an 18" concrete trowel) let that set, then do the same for the other side. This is done for the first ...


1

I've finished pulling the old door and jam out and installing the new one. The method did work but was a bit harder than I thought. First, my front door jams where nailed flush to the framing with no shims making getting the saw in there pretty hard. Because of that, the stucco moding did seperate from the stucco some but no bad, I will need to go back ...


1

It is conventional that the wire that comes for use by stucco is backed by a special paper that prevents the stucco from contacting to the underlying wood or plywood. The wire should also be installed with special nails that have a pair of spacer washers (the ones I've used had fiberboard washers) on the nails. These are designed to hold the wire a certain ...


1

Sounds like a good idea. You will need to put a layer of roofing felt over the plywood, as stucco will absorb water. You will also need to attach the mesh with galvanized nails or lath screws so they don't corrode. There are two kinds of stucco: base coat and finish. For small jobs like this, you can probably get away with using just two layers of base ...


1

My house was originally built in 1953 and I lived in it for 10 years. It was too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter. Drains got clogged easily, Water supply was getting clogged. None of the electrical outlets were grounded, there weren't enough outlets or enough amperage in the breaker box or electrical service. Roof was starting to leak, windows ...



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