New answers tagged

0

It sounds like you need to support the 2x6 or 2x8 from below with a load bearing wall or beam. If you will be walking around up there, then you should build it like floor not a shelf. Nailing floor joists to the ceiling trusses would probably be slightly less optimal than not nailing them together because flexibility of the joist is part of the strength, but ...


2

First you need to determine the weight of the items you plan to store. If the trusses were designed under the IBC/IRC or the UBC (and maybe the BOCA and SBCCI) codes, then they should of been designed with a 10 psf live load on the bottom chord. If you keep below this loading you should be okay, but you might want to check out the code requirements for your ...


3

From the information you've provided, it seems as though the post is likely not needed. However, none of us have been to your house, seen the plans, nor talked to the builder or engineer. So we cannot say for sure, what the purpose of the post is. I've seen temporary braces, and even tools left behind on builds. So it's definitely possible that it's no ...


2

These are definitely just temp posts, probably to help during the metal beam install. if supporting they would be capped and anchored around metal they are 2x4s - I can't imagine a house loading using 2x4s they are too close to the metal post. If they meant anything at all there would be some sort of space between the metal post and them - at least 5-10 ...


2

Here is the answer to my actual question: http://awc.org/codes-standards/calculators-software/spancalc Edit: Sorry if I'm not on the same wavelengths as anyone else. I already know about insurance and inspectors, and that was not at all what I was asking about. I just wanted to know what length of wood would span a certain distance given various ...


0

A. I. Breveleri provides a good starting point but I'd beef everything up to 2x6s and you'll definitely want some cross members front to back in the top of the stand. As A. I. mentioned you need something to keep the legs from moving. I'd build another frame like the top around the bottom. Since this is for an aquarium being level is VERY important. Not ...


4

I am not a licensed carpenter but I have replaced walls and doors in my old house. Here is how I would do it. I think you should not try to use a cantilevered or bracketed shelf for this. Make a strong table to hold the aquarium. In the following I am assuming wood construction, with your walls made of the usual 2"x4" studs and wallboard. The front ...


2

They could simply be thermal expansion and contraction, delayed due to the large heat capacity of a home. It takes quite a while for the solar gain that has soaked into an attic to be released, for example. I'd stake out your attic Columbo-style and give it a good listen and feel. Chances are it's not a sign of structural problems, but it's surely an ...



Top 50 recent answers are included