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3

In my experience, most spark ignition ranges spark all the burners at the same time. So, it's probably just an issue with that burner not sparking - spark gap shorted out with food is the usual cause. Broken wire is possible but much less likely. Try looking at the left front burner spark (which you see when trying to light the front right) while lighting ...


0

It is possible that the element that you purchased has a defect in it. The element may act as if it has continuity for electrical current to flow through it when cold. As it heats up there is some expansion going on and this could cause some part of the resistive electrical conductor to open circuit and interrupt the current flow till the unit cools back ...


1

Smooth-top stoves can be damaged if an element gets too hot. To prevent this, each element has a thermostat which cuts off the heat at a certain temperature. It probably won't happen if you have a properly-sized pot of water heating up, but if you put the element on high with no pot then the element will definitely start cycling off and on at some point.


4

See table 220.55 in the NEC, as well as footnote 4 to that table: Branch-Circuit Load. It shall be permissible to calculate the branch-circuit load for one range in accordance with Table 220.55. The branch- circuit load for one wall-mounted oven or one counter-mounted cooking unit shall be the nameplate rating of the appliance. The branch-circuit ...


1

Absolutely not. You cannot just stick two or more appliances together and call it a combo and think it will be okay. Edit unless you follow the NEC 220.55 code calculations. If the manufacturer calls for a dedicated circuit then the above exception may not apply. As a final note, circuits should be brought up to current electrical standards if need be. ...



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