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OK, I did it. Here is how: Remove the jet holder from the stove, put it in a vise (gently) Insert spiral bolt extractor. Tap it in with two hammer taps. Attach socket to end of bolt extractor. Use electric impact wrench, short bursts, and break it free. Was able to remove three of four no problem. The fourth was frozen completely, and I will replace ...


1

Assuming there are vertical side-cabinet panels at the areas you want to cut out (ie, you won't be leaving a section of countertop or shelves hanging in mid-air) and that the countertop is a laminate over wood(-ish), then a handheld circular saw can make the bulk of the cuts, with a jigsaw to get the back corners. You can screw a straight piece of wood to ...


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Is the remaining portion of the tube a soft metal like brass? Even if it was steel I would think that you could use some strong pliers to get ahold of the upper edge and start to bend it inward. doing so would start to free the metal from the base it was screwed into and possibly even getting it to the point it would be able to turn. Try the bending process ...


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I'm about to do this on my bus stove pipe. Copper is an excellent heat transfer material. It does become annealed at around 800 °F. However, this is far from the standard stove pipe temperature. Don't let people ruin your vision of what is safe and what isn't. Building codes are written to protect people from themselves and shady contractors, and to ...


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Go the stove manufacturers' websites and read the installation manuals for the stoves, checking particularly for installation clearances. You could also replace the drywall behind the stove with 5/8 or 1/2" (depending what the surrounding drywall is) tile-backer (cement-board) and/or cover it with 1/4, 1/2 or 5/8" spaced off the wall surface by 1/2" to 1" ...


1

No idea what your paying for the new range but I would think another $20 for a new cord would be a safe investment. Just be sure to check your existing receptacle. Based on your stated age of you old range it is likely you only have a receptacle with 3 prongs. Two hots and a neutral but no ground. All codes and manufacturers now require grounds. Be sure ...


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Personally... New! Especially as you know it is at least 40 years old. Irrespective of how well things are looked after they degrade over time and I don't think I'd sleep well at night knowing there is a potential issue just waiting for the most inopportune moment to rear it's ugly head.


8

A nearly 40 year old power cord is going to be nasty. Dust, grease, possibly cracked insulation internally, possibly asbestos insulation if the "original" cord was itself recycled. All are fine unless you disturb the cord. Pulling the stove out disturbs the cord. Pulling out a stove is a fairly major operation, I would take the opportunity to completely ...


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As long as nothing is burned or melted on the plug end, and provided it is appropriate for the application (amperage wise) you should be fine reusing the old cord.



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