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13

I would say that this is highly dangerous. It is against US and Canadian code to not have outside ventilation for any fuel-burning appliance in your home; that's your furnace, HWH and stove/oven, assuming all are NG or propane. It is only acceptable to have a "filter-only" vent hood for your stove if it's all-electric (which BTW is the case for every single ...


11

There's two issues here. The first is the CO alarm. SOMETHING is wrong. It may be the stove, or some other combustion device in your house, but it's definitely something to pay attention to. I'd suggest getting a second CO detector and place it around the house and monitor the levels carefully. If it's the stove, it's less of a ventilation issue and more of ...


9

It makes complete sense to replace your water heater early, because the failure mode for most of the older ones is "break and drain all over the inside of your house" -- and the 'drip pan' can only catch so much. You don't say where you're from, so I can't give you any climate or region-specific suggestions on what to replace and what not to replace. I ...


7

Do you have the manual for the thing? I've done a little poking around (I even found a bunch of parts diagrams at Sears website), and I'm getting the impression that it's got a spark ignition system, not a pilot. Is the range plugged in? Is there any chance that the circuit it's on has tripped it's breaker? I've got a cooktop with a spark ignition system, ...


6

Get the 220v outlet while you can. With that wiring, you can run two 110v circuits in the future or install an electric oven if you change your mind. Running another line in the future would be much more difficult, so now is the time to have it installed. The only change you'll likely have to make is replacing the double breaker with two single breakers if ...


6

Have a look at the 2006 International Residential Code. Here are a few sections that may apply. Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems SECTION M1501 GENERAL M1501.1 Outdoor discharge. The air removed by every mechanical exhaust system shall be discharged to the outdoors. Air shall not be exhausted into an attic, soffit, ridge vent or crawl ...


5

There should be a vent cover on the outside of the house, at the end of the exhaust with a damper or louvers. Something like this The damper or louvers will be shut when the hood fan is off, preventing air from coming in or going out. If you don't have a vent cover like this, you should install one. If you already have one, you'll want to inspect it to ...


5

There are no definite answers here. Lifespan of your appliances depends on how often you use them, how well you take care of them, quality of the appliance in question (bargain basement vs premium brand), and dumb luck. You can replace your water heater now as a preventative measure, and you'll be kicking yourself when your fridge dies tomorrow. However, ...


5

If your refrigerator really is 20 years old, you should investigate whether it makes sense to buy a new, more energy efficient one. The electric utility may provide a rebate in addition to what you will save on electricity. Most of the appliances you mention should last a very long time with little maintenance. For the dryer you should keep the lint trap ...


5

Why did they turn off the gas? To do some work? If that is the case then there is probably air in the line. The pilot orifice is small compared to the burners which means it will take longer for the air to "bleed out". Alternatively, there may be a button somewhere that you have to hold down (to get the gas flowing to the pilots) in order to light the ...


5

In most cases when you purchase a free-standing electric range, you'll be required to purchase the appliance cord separately. The sales person should ask if you need a 3 or 4 prong cord, at the time of purchase. NEC Article 250.140 Frames of Ranges and Clothes Dryers. requires 4 prong receptacles and appliance cords to be used in new installations, but ...


4

To increase the amp rating of your circuit breaker, you almost certainly need to increase the gauge of all the wiring on that circuit. Circuit breakers are there to protect the wiring for overloading, overheating, melting the insulation, and eventually starting a fire. Typically, you have the following wire gauges (this may vary with long circuits and your ...


3

Just as a combination answer bringing together several very salient comments: The space for your stove is gas-ready if and only if there is a gas line, generally either copper or steel and with NPT threads, protruding from the wall or floor behind your existing stove, with a shut-off valve installed. A line that is capped at the end without a shutoff valve ...


3

Look behind the stove. If it's set up for gas, there will be a gas pipe+valve behind it. If not, then you'd need to get it added.


3

Putting the stove in the corner like you propose also gives you some nice space to work with for routing the pipe up into the ceiling / roof area or out an exerior wall. Seems to me that re-routing the vent to the previous riser location is a total non-starter. Many hoods vent up into the small cabinet above the hood and your re-routed vent pipe is going ...


3

I don't think there is enough information provided in your question to absolutely answer this, as well, we try and stay away from location-specific codes on this site. As Tester101 mentioned, whether you can re-use the existing vent will depend on the distance as well as the size of the vent and the number of bends. The capacity of the hood will also play ...


3

In case the range is not square? Huh? Don't hire the person that said this! Ranges come in standard sizes, and as you see, your 30" range is NOT 30". The standard is to set the space between the base cabinets is 30"


3

When living with stoves old enough to have pilot lights, I and my family have always had them turned off by the repairman to eliminate the fire hazard. The pilot lights were controlled by a small valve under the stovetop, in the small-diameter lines feeding the pilots. The risk from turning them off that I know of is that the valve may not shut off ...


3

Any house can be equipted to run a gas stove. Some houses have gas service from the utility, others have on-site tanks. If you already have gas service or some type of gas distribution in your house, then you can add a stove by having a licensed contractor run a line to your kitchen. The process is similar to running new pipes or electrical circuits. ...


3

Assuming it's anything like the US, you'll have a dedicated breaker for the stove in your electrical panel. Shut it off first (really, it would be a good idea to do that before moving the stove for the renovation). With the power turned off, you can remove the wall plate (I don't see screws in your picture, so you may just have to pry it off) and/or remove ...


3

You need to use a listed insulating stovepipe anytime combustible construction is penetrated. These pipes are also listed to be enclosed by construction. Thus it seems acceptable to me to install the listed stovepipe and enclose it inside a decorative copper tube. For good measure, you should probably have some provision for venting the resulting annular ...


3

The basic chemistry of efficient natural gas burning is about a 10:1 air to fuel ratio. The air at high altitudes has less oxygen per volume (the air is less dense) There are a number of ways to compensate. Derate the burner by decreasing the fuel orifice size. This returns the burner to the correct air-fuel ratio, but produces less heat. This method ...


3

Before you do anything else, look at the appliance's rating plate. It is probably located somewhere inside the door or maybe on the back. While this one is for an electric clothes dryer, all appliance ratings plates have the same information. You can see it clearly indicates the amperes required, in this case 24. So a 30 amp circuit would be fine. If ...


2

Since you already have a gas fireplace (natural gas or propane) then that means you have some kind of gas service. It is entirely possible to have a gas range. As Steven says in previous answer, the cost is going to vary depending on the path the contractor has to take to run a line to the range location. If the gas service in in an unfinished basement or ...


2

For an accummulation of gas, you would smell rotten eggs. I suspect something spilled on the floor under the appliance, or something plastic fell back behind it.


2

I can't comment on replies yet (at least not these) -- I agree with the receptacle adapter and keeping the 220 circuit as-is. Something else to consider though, is placement of the gas line stub. Some stoves have specific requirements for placement, and not knowing could you require you to have a plumber come in to relocate it. Older stoves had more ...


2

I'll bet the control switch is broken. This is not a difficult fix, but usually requires lifting the range top to access the wiring harness and install a new switch. Most appliance stores with a service department will also sell the parts. If your range is a new solid state computer controlled, you may have a bad control board. If that is the case, the ...


2

I will assume this wood stove has a proper air jacket from which heated air can be drawn? The possibility of dangerous gases infiltrating into this jacket is a valid concern and entirely dependent on the integrity of the firebox. This can only be done by careful inspection and possibly some sort of pressure test. In theory, this can be just as safe as any ...


2

There is an inexpensive commercial product called an anti-tip bracket. It is screwed directly to the floor and the foot of the stove slides into the slot. It's primarily designed to go on the rear foot, so that a child climbing up the front of the stove won't pull it down on top of him/her self. But you slide the stove into the rear bracket, and then ...


2

In order to produce the maximum amout of heat the natural gas and air are mixed at precise ratios. Because the amount of oxygen in a given volume of air varies with altitude, air at high altitiude doesn't contain enough oxygen for an efficient mixture. .High altitude burners allow more air to mix with the gas to maintain optimal fuel/air ratios.



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