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7

In this case, you would simply not hook up the neutral wire. Instead you can just put a wirenut on it and tuck it neatly into the electrical box. Typically 240V appliances require the neutral wire so that they can run the electronics at 120v or provide a plug on the appliance. In this case, these devices are hooked up to one leg of the hot and the ...


5

Induction hobs work by creating a magnetic field which causes electrical currents in the base of the pot or pan. These currents heat the pan through normal electrical resistance. The further away the pot is from the hob, the weaker the magnetic field, so you're going to lose a lot of efficiency right there. From a safety point of view, there are several ...


5

Tempered glass is almost impossible to cut without shattering it after it's tempered, so you'd have to find a piece exactly the right size. And even then I don't know if it would withstand high temperatures -- in fact it may get hot enough to un-temper it, in which case it would be a lot weaker and likely to break in normal use. I have no idea if you can ...


4

Given the direct flame exposure, and that the flames are actually quite a bit hotter than BBQ paint is rated for (1950C for natural gas, 2392C for propane) I'd suggest sticking to clean, coat with vegetable oil (wipe on a thin layer) and bake. This makes a pretty good finish, and does not involve anything that's not going to happen in normal food preparation ...


4

Yes you can paint them with high heat BBQ grill paint. You can find this paint at any hardware store, walmart or lowes etc. It is rated for 1400 degrees normally. Be aware, however, that the surface in contact with your pans will wear off fairly quickly. I personally would paint the grates, then burnish the paint off where it makes contact with the pans so ...


4

Typically no caulking is used when setting a range top into a counter, however in your case where you are getting water from the sink under the lip, a small amount of silicone would not be a problem. The very outside mounting flange of you cook top should not get very hot. If you can touch it when the range is in use, then a standard silicone would be fine. ...


3

OK, my understanding is that you have a stove on a section of counter that doesn't have a wall immediately behind it. This could result in a "peninsula" design, or an outright "island". Either way, what you want is an "island-mount vent hood". They're designed to install in the ceiling instead of against a wall, for stoves that are out in the middle of a ...


3

The heaters are probably thermostat controlled and what you see is a normal behaviour of the thermostat maintaining a target temperature. Many electric heaters work this way (some are able to control input power instead, but such device is a lot more difficult to produce for most electric heater types).


3

I had the exact same experience after my wife bought a glass top stove for our kitchen. I had many pots boil over and burn the first year and I hated the beast. It took some experience and practice to get a feel for how the glass stove performs. I eventually learned how to anticipate something coming to a boil and turning down the heat early enough to ...


2

You want silicone caulk. Silicone is the classic caulking material and can be extremely heat-resistant. The fancy flexible bakeware that has become popular in the last 5 or so years is molded silicone. I've used the silicone caulks from the home improvements stores before, but I don't know for certain their heat resistant qualities. Search for the terms ...


2

The problem is clearly with the gas feed. If other portions (like other burners) work okay, the plumbing in common to those and further upstream is all fine. The problem would be the last portions to the burners. I would start by removing the grate, lifting off the burner caps, and lift up the burner assemblies. Any foreign matter in there? If there is ...


2

We have the same stove and this is a flaw in the Whirlpool design. The heaters are electronic (they look like IR LEDs) and thus switch on and off very fast. This makes it very difficult to cook some foods (e.g. grilled cheese) because the stove may be effectively on "max" for 2 seconds and then "zero" for 10 seconds. The toast burns before the cheese ...


2

Stoves in the USA are designed to be able to produce the maximum heat setting on both 240 volts and on 208 volts. At 208 volts it will be on a higher percentage of time, but not as red. At 240 volts it gets hotter when on, but goes off for more time to make up for that. Many residences, particularly those in high-rise or large buildings, will get their ...


2

Already answered but assuming this is a US house you don't have 3 phase industrial power. Most likely you don't even have the other 2 phases on the utility pole. You have split phase residential power. A neutral isn't needed since it's balanced no current would flow thru it in the cook top. Basically one phase off the primary side with a center tap. The ...


2

Those lights are driven by thermostat switches in the glass top surface. Sometimes there is only one, sometimes there is one for each burner. You'll need to open the stove to figure out what kind you have, and then disconnect them one by one to figure out which one is stick. From there you should be able to order a replacement.


1

IMHO: The number of coils does make a minor difference in the time it takes to heat the burner; on the one with the extra coils, the coil's elements are usually smaller and therefor heat faster and cool faster. The extra turns make up for the smaller coils. You have to look at the ratings of the different coils. Are they the same wattage? Are the ...


1

First of all, you are mistaken about your assumption that there is a difference in voltage on different size coils on an electric range top. The switches, wiring harness and sockets are the same for all the range top coils. there is no difference in voltage and all feeds are interchangeable except for the length of the wire feed that helps keep the ...


1

The self-clean temperature won't get high enough to melt the metal -- and the burner pieces are subject to pretty high heat anyway. I have cleaned aluminum and enameled parts in a self-clean cycle and the only time I have had problems is with large surface-area part (think a frying pan or something) -- in this case you might warp the metal by subjecting it ...


1

The gas grill lines aren't OK but CSST, which is a flexible line usually painted yellow for interior or black plastic coating for exterior, should be OK. Here is a safety website about CSST http://www.csstsafety.com/


1

You have two main options: Option one is what Keith mentions. It's basically a free standing range hood. I kind of like the looks of these myself. Down draft vent. This is where the exhaust fan is part of the cook top or counter top and vents downward (out an exhaust through the lower cabinets). These are kind of neat from a technology perspective but not ...


1

Heating a pot thru a sheet of paper works perfectly well as long as you stay below the paper's flash point. This is actually useful when making jam or similar sticky foods, or when you want to use a cast-iron pot but are afraid it will scratch the surface. The classic demo is boiling water, for the same reasons you can boil water in a paper cup. But paper ...


1

We looked at this for a commercial unit in our church, and the consensus was to just buy two residential-class stoves with electronic ignition rather than pay for the retrofit. It was that costly. I would imagine that residential stoves, which aren't designed to be messed around with much, would have a similar problem; you're basically replacing everything ...


1

One other option to try before replacing it would be to check with a glass supplier - my local auto glass replacement place, for example, also does a lot of glass for wood stoves. If they have the ability to work with that type of glass, they may also be able to help with a replacement piece for your stove.


1

If it's only chipped, and not actually a crack forming, I'd think that you'd be able to just add a little bit of trim over the very edge. The glass doesn't tend to get too hot over on the sides, but there'd be a good chance of taking a hot pan, and it coming into contact, so you'd want something that could take heat (so not most plastics). It's possible ...



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