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11

Around the elbow no good, for ropes they get tangled and for cords they get ruined over time. See my instructions below, but check out this animation for reference. Keep in mind, I am right handed and this is how I do it: Start by placing one end of the rope between your left thumb and forefinger, and grab the rope with your right hand about 2 1/2 - 3 ...


11

You could build a drywall storage rack. Start by building 2 or 3 triangular frames out of scrap 2x4s. Space them out to the desired length. To prevent sheets from sagging between supports, lay a sheet of plywood on the rack before placing drywall on it. A rack like this may be overkill for a short term storage solution, but could come in ...


9

It's stored on it's side (beveled edge up/down) all the time on job sites. Just make sure to protect bottom edge and keep it off the ground if there's a moisture risk. The best solution is to get 3 or 4 of the blocks of drywall that they have when delivering it (allows them to get the forklifts under a stack) and use those to keep it off the ground. In ...


8

Use the garage if you're worried about the floor's capacity. Place the drywall blocks on the floor first (the truck delivering the drywall usually has a bunch of these to protect the drywall and to make it easier to get the lift under the stack). On top of the blocks, put some plastic if you're worried about moisture in the floor. The drywall goes on top of ...


6

To get perfect coils: Don't twist. When you wrap hand-to-elbow, you're introducing a twist with every loop of the coil. You can make figure-8s (great for small stuff, like this) or you can alternate the twist of each loop (as Gunner directed). If your rope already has a twist, you should take the twist out by overhauling. Start at one end and pass the ...


6

The attic needs to be able to breath to reduce the heat buildup during the summer and prevent condensation and ice dams in the winter. So don't do anything that would block the air flow from the soffit to ridge vent, and don't place anything in direct contact with the roof. The result is that the rafters shouldn't have any storage items installed between ...


5

Your best bet is to use a solution to kill the bacteria that might be living in the pot. This happens with steel / aluminum water containers as well, in my experience, so never fear! According to the official Clorox blog: It is good your daycare is using bleach for disinfecting, and now you can pass along some information to help them use it correctly! ...


5

If all your tools are steel or other ferromagnetic material, I would try something like this: It's a magnetic knife holder that you should be able to buy at any kitchen store. Alternatively, you could build something along the lines of a traditional knife block by glue-laminating pieces of wood and leaving appropriate gaps for each square. Although, ...


4

Since you say you have a ceiling system and no direct rain in this protected area, I would think you want a material that will pack down firmly so wheels of equipment and walking won't depress into the material too much. I have used 3/8" stone dust, which is a by-product of the stone crushing process mixed with 3/8" pea stone. This material is heavy, forms ...


4

I have two of these Racor Heavy Lifts in my garage now. I also had one in my old house. They now have a rod that you can connect to a drill to raise and lower the platforms. At $127 they are very affordable and work quite well. I store my lawnmower on it in the winter and the snowblower on it in the summer along with some other items that are not used ...


4

I used to work for a tree service, and I've coiled rope thousands of times, from 1/4" throw line to 1 1/4" bull rope that was usually between 150' and 200' long of several different braid types. I am about as professional at coiling as you can be. Many ropes (especially larger ones) are designed to be coiled by a right hander. TomG above has the right ...


4

This is really tough to explain, but very simple to do. Coiled rope (and electric cord) should be loose, and a simple toss should be all that's required to unravel entirely - lifeguards and sailors are taught the trick to coiling rope tangle-free, as a tangle can literally be a matter of life or death in their profession. To coil, consistent loop sizes are ...


4

I have an idea for you. Instead of insulating and heating the entire garage to save a few gallons of paint, perhaps you could build a small insulated paint locker. Build a box or cabinet large enough to store all your paints. Insulate the inside with some 2 inch rigid foam or R-11 blanket insulation and put some foam weather stripping around the insulated ...


4

Latex paint is composed of a mixture of components that when frozen can cause the solids to expand and separate from the mixture. Effects of using damaged latex paint can result in degraded performance such as un-even coat, less gloss, cracking and peeling of paint much sooner when exposed to the environments (sun light), and etc. It is not recommended to ...


4

Don't use brackets. use two by threes to make shelves of the size you want. frame with them edge up and screw 1/2' or 3/4" plywood on top. bolt the back edge into every stud. every five or six feet on the edge furthest from the wall bolt in another 2 by three that is oriented vertically and goes all the way to the floor. I support a very large amount of ...


3

I'm not completely sure this is on topic, but I'll try. I assume you mean one of these: If you want to cut a hole in it, you'll want to cut it in the "front" and make sure you don't go all the way across it from left to right. Alternatively, you can just use a boxcutter or utility knife to make the seam deeper for the front flap, so you can just reach in ...


3

The plastic contains Volatile Corrosion Inhibitor (VCI) molecules that are adsorbed onto the metallic surface, protecting the metallic surface by forming a film. The Zerust FAQ claims that the inhibitor “passivate the electron flow between the anodic and cathodic areas on metal surfaces and interrupt the electro-chemical corrosion process.” Zerust products ...


3

I'm rather late to join in with answers, but this looks like a good reference question and no one has yet mentioned our fool proof method. There's two issues that need to be addressed to have tangle free rope, wire, cable, etc. One is you must not introduce twists in the material, as kinks will develop. Some variation mentioned already of alternating ...


3

The first thing that comes to mind for me, would be to attach multiple gears to a long axle driven by a motor. Since you don't want to drive all the winches at once, you'd have to devise a way for the axle to spin independently of each gear. So the first pieces you'd need are gears with collars, that would fit just over the axle. Putting a hole in the ...


3

It's probably not a problem, but to be safer you can dump in a bunch of dry ice and let the CO2 displace the air. This will work best if the only opening to the tank is at the very top, since the CO2 is heavier than air. See here for a website promoting this idea.


3

This is just my preference/opinion on the subject. Both types have their uses. If you have space for more than a single board, I would advise a mixture with more peg boards then slat boards. If you only have space for a single board then I'd recommend a pegboard because I find them to be more versitile overall. The slats are good for hanging bins while ...


3

Since you are contemplating shelving, I am going to assume that you want to store more stuff in a given square footage than you can without shelving, and that you want to be able to access that stuff randomly, that is, without removing items piled upon the item that you want. What is the Maximum Weight I will be Storing? I've got a shelving unit in a ...


3

If the radiators are still hot you'll have to get the shut offs repaired first. The heat and the resulting drying action will raise havoc with the wood. The issue isn't so much a fire hazard as a drying hazard. The wood is going to shrink in the winter and expand in the summer. The seams and joints will split. I would also make the design so that you have ...


3

The first step is to make the floor designed to support a load. It's not unusual for an attic to be designed with only the materials needed to support the roof and hold up the drywall ceiling below. So you'll need to install proper floor joists, cross bracing, and then a subfloor. To get the joists in place, if there isn't a load bearing wall in the center, ...


3

Ventilation This is basically what you're trying to achieve, with respects to ventilation and insulation of the roof. Soffit (eave) vents Start at the bottom of the roof, with soffit vents. Baffels Baffels are used to provide a channel along the underside of the roof decking, to allow air to flow from the soffit to the roof vents. You don't ...


2

Based on your comment that you'll be storing heavy items, it's worth it to go with a more sturdy metal rack. If you're worried about carpet damage, dents are relatively simple to fix with steam, ice, or other methods. In the worst case, you'd probably prefer a few square inches of flattened carpet than your possessions broken.


2

I would go with Option 2 - and then use that reasoning to insulate and heat the garage! :D In all seriousness, I am currently having that dilemma in my condo - owning a bunch of power tools with nowhere to store them all conveniently. I've divided my tools up into two groups, one that gets used regularly (impact driver, drill) and stuff that doesn't ...



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