Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

The US has a mixture of systems. I'm not sure what the prevalence is, but I've lived in homes with both steam and hot water heating. Steam offers the following advantages: One-pipe systems More heat transfer for a given radiator surface No distribution pumps Steam offers the following drawbacks: Furnace needs to be a low point Corrosion Finicky ...


10

Insulate the pipes. You are likely losing a lot of heat into your basement if they aren't insulated. Unless your basement is finished (and therefore you want the heat there) you want to keep as much heat in those pipes as possible so that it gets into the main part of your house. The heater (and other similar equipment like hot water heater) should heat ...


8

This is basically going to be landlord work unless you plan playing heating technician and checking the basement pipes. Here's the gist: Air vents on the radiator must flow air out so it can be replaced by steam to heat. They sometimes have adjustment valves on them so you can balance the system. Air vents that are producing a lot of noise are either too ...


3

As pointed out by others, luminaires above or near a tub/shower must be "steam-proof" (rated for damp locations). This means the fixture will be sealed in some way, to prevent moisture from entering the housing and causing damage and/or an unsafe environment. NEC 2008 410.10 Luminaires in Specific Locations. (D) Bathtub and Shower Areas. No parts ...


3

My favorite pipe thread sealer is RectorSeal #5. Here's a link. I see according to its datasheet that its rated for steam pipes. You might have to let it dry a little while before pressuring, but after that its good for 2600 psi.


3

If your pressuretrol is truly acting up, I would replace it. I'm sure you've already ensured the pigtail is free of sediment, etc. In my experience as an HVAC controls tech, once mechanical controls start to act up, it's usually more cost effective to replace the item in question than continuing to rely on a compromised pressuretrol. (Murphy's Law is in ...


3

To echo what @acrosman said, yes insulate the pipes. I'd suggest using fiberglass pipe insulation joined with foil tape, and loose fiberglass / PVC caps for turns. Wear a respirator. Cuts can be made with a sharp, long utility knife. here's an example:


3

Don't change them. Single line steam radiators are tricky at the best of times, and most modern plumbers have little experience with them. In addition base board radiators make it impossible to put bookcases in. (In our climate they use up all of the external wall.) There are lots of ways to dress them up Recessing them is a bad idea, as the space to ...


3

Dry steamers are the preferred model as they reach upwards of 240 degrees Fahrenheit and leave less moisture after treatment. Wet steamers, still effective on bed bugs, don’t reach such high temperatures and can leave surfaces wet; the higher the temperature, the more effective in tight spots. http://www.badbedbugs.com/bed-bug-steamer/ So they aren't ...


2

The vents on a steam system, by releasing the air, allow the steam to rise. Often, the risers far away from the boiler will have their own vent to get the heat there quicker. If you capped it it would probably take longer for that part of the house to get warm. From an efficiency point of view you want that air purged ASAP. You can balance a system with ...


2

I used a reciprocating saw with a metal blade to cut though my cast iron pipe. It's $60 if you don't already have one, but they come in handy. You could also use a angle grinder with a metal blade, but that's louder, sparkier and smells more.


2

I'd re-scrape, then smear a layer of white/clear caulk of the tub/tile/sink variety, working it into the 'wood' as much as possible.


2

If this is the only area that's being damaged then you could try screwing some stainless steel sheeting beneath it to act as a heat and steam shield from the dishwasher. You'll need to make sure that the very edge of the steel is not exposed so make sure it doesn't protrude out. And you may need to put some epoxy or similar right to the edge to stop the ...


2

The container doesn't have to be a PVC pipe. Wood boxes were the traditional solution, and still seem to be more common among woodworkers than the PVC approach. There are steam generators available from woodworking stores which are a bit more effective than an electric kettle. They may or may not be significantly more energy-efficient; boiling water takes ...


1

I have made and used one of these. I used a section of downspout for gutter systems. The parts I was bending were less than an inch in diameter. The chamber was in 2 pieces, 1 pc 3' the other 7' the crimped ends that downspouts have as the slip joint for separation. The ends were cut and folded to seal the ends and pop riveted to hold, no sealant used. The ...


1

The suggestions were appreciated, but we tried something different. First we smoothed it out as best as we could with razor blades and sandpaper (it still wasn't very smooth), then I put on 8 or more coats of Rustoleum protective enamel oil based paint. I'll see how it holds up. As you can see, it looks pretty ugly from underneath, but you can't see it ...


1

The particular model in the diagram should have the orifice hand tight. If the orifice is left loose it can vibrate loose and fall off. There are other models and other brands that are adjustable. By turning the cap you expose more or less of the orifice. The larger the orifice the faster the air is expelled. This allows the steam to enter the radiator at a ...


1

First of all I assume that the radiator is functioning properly and gets nice and hot(215F for steam) If not than it is not a problem of sizing. To figure out if this radiator is appropriate for the given room we need to calculate how much heat it emits. It is all based on its surface area. This radiator looks like it could be National Aero Four Tube ...


1

My interpretation is that if the fixture is at all over the shower/bath, it has to be steam-proof.


1

you are trying to get a comparison on apples and oranges as both work on entirely different principles: steam cleaners use steam to sterilize and loosen dirt for mopping up with a rag which may or may not be attached to the steam cleaner vacuum cleaners just suck up loose dirt vacuum cleaners are better for carpets while steam cleaners are better for ...


1

I talked to the guy who originally installed the boiler and he suggested that the pressure was probably a bit high (was set to 1.5 PSI) for our house; if the pressure is too high, then more steam than the radiators can handle is sent out at a time, and therefor the steam doesn't condense back to water at the radiators at first, so the water level gets low ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible