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1

You really need another skirt board for the wall. When I have my druthers, I make the skirt board the same thickness as the base that will meet it at the top and bottom so it ties in continuously. If need be, I rip a base so the top element, if it has a profile, will make it look like the base goes right up the wall along with the treads. As a mention, the ...


1

I recently put in a set of hardwood (oak) stairs and finished with a water based stain and water based coating (several coats until I liked the look). We have thousands of trips up and down and there is absolutely no visible wear. Not to say there won't be BUT it is impressive so far that there is no wear. Three dogs up and down with us most trips too!


1

That's a very wide piece of wood, and, unsurprisingly, it cracked. However, assuming that it structurally sound, the easiest way to fix it that will look reasonably good is Cut a long thin wedge-shaped piece of wood that matches what you have (I'd guess pine); the piece should look like a long knife) Clean out the and scrape it down with a chisel apply ...


2

If it's easy to remove the tread (and it may be) it's likely easiest to just replace it. If it's not so easy to replace it, what you could do is put in a couple of pocket screws using a pocket screw kit. Kreg is a popular brand that makes pocket screw kits that you can find at most any big-box store. You'd set up the jig, drill your holes, squirt a bit of ...


1

I would do this for a quick, strong fix, assuming the wood is not loose or rotten: Get yourself a tube or two of heavy duty construction adhesive (Liquid Nails, Titebond, etc.). Inject a bead as far into every joint as you can, both where the treads are cracked and where they meet the risers. Carefully scrape off any adhesive laying on or above the wood ...


0

I will agree with ojait and say that a wood filler like dyed opoxy would be your friend here. Unless you want to replace the wood pieces yourself, or if your contractor will not take care to fix the shrinking. The problem is of course that your drier home during this time of season has shrunk the wood and that really isn't something that the contractor ...


1

Due to climate changes in your house (moisture and heat fluctuations) and the natural tendency for wood to be effected from them, wood will move. The drier and more unsealed the wood is the more it will swell and contract. Also depending on how it was milled and what section of the tree it was cut from will determine how much moisture it can absorb and ...


3

The building code does address the width, profile, and the rounding of the treads. From the 2009 IBC: R311.5.3.3 Profile. The radius of curvature at the leading edge of the tread shall be no greater than 9/16 inch (14 mm). I believe the reason for rounding the leading edge of the tread with wood is to reduce the likelihood of splintering. Also, ...


1

OSB is used for one of two reasons in my area: just builder's grade prepackaged stairs. I can order a set of stairs for a couple hundred and have them installed in a basement in 2 hours by getting OSB (I never do this but could). in a cheaply built home these could be used as is and carpeted. I would personally never leave the OSB under the treads ...



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