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You can use 2 pcs of 5/4X6" to replace each tread. It will keep the same dimension as your originals, 5 1/2" + 5 1/2" + 1/4" gap = 11 1/4" This is a very typical detail. You should have an overhand at the front corner, call a "nose". Your originals may already have that, if so, simply follow the same detail, but using the two pieces per tread.


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Grip Pliers (Vice Grip) to clamp the tip of the screw and unscrew. Thats what I would do. unless the head will get stuck as its going out the other end. You will need to clamp the head parallel to the board so that you can get maximum torque.


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If I were doing this, I'd use a hole saw with a portable drill press. If the hole saw leaves a rough hole, you can follow up with a larger forstner bit. Then fill the holes with plugs. You can make them with a plug cutter, but they're cheap to buy online.


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In the end I went with the spring bolt plus wood glue. I have no doubt that a spline would have worked well, but I wanted something hidden from view. The first spring bolt failed: I might have over-tightened it, or I might have not waited long enough for the glue to set. Second spring bolt held better. It's been 4 days and so far it's solid. The ...


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You could use a plug cutter to remove the screw and surrounding wood.


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A spline across that miter would work very well to reinforce it. Depending on the thickness of the rail, you could even use two. This is very similar to this question


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Treads and risers install should start at the bottom step. First the riser and then the tread. However, on the tread you leave a 1/4 inch gap on the back edge and then install the next riser. Your riser your be at least 1/2in thick and the tread no less than 1 inch thick. This gives support to the back of the tread and the 1/4 inch gap allows for expansion. ...



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