Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

You will need to completely redo the stairs to convert to an open stringer. If you were to cut the stringer flush to the top of the stairs you will not have enough structural support left to safely support the stairs. From the pictures you provided, there would be about 2-3 inches of material left from the cut. Do you really only want that much material ...


0

What if you temporarily supported the stairway from underneath (use 1x10s or 2x10s against the bottom of the stairs, supported by vertical 4x4s) then cut out and remove the outside stringer completely. You could then use the bottoms and backs of the existing treads and risers as a template to cut a new heavy-duty stringer. Then you could replace the treads ...


1

The problem you have is that on a staircase designed with open stringers, the tread sits on top of the full thickness of the stringer, and often sticks out a bit over. In a closed stringer setup, the tread is wedged in a dado (a groove) cut into the inside face of the stringer. Generally the groove is about half the thickness of the stringer. If you cut off ...


2

It depends on how the particular stair was constructed. Although the absence of a central stringer is evidence that the treads are capable of spanning without the support of a riser, it is not proof that they are adequate for the span. Likewise, the absence of a central stringer does not mean that the stair is laterally stable without risers. Even assuming ...


0

I'd have two concerns. The first is the structural aspect. Composite wood is quite bendable, so if you wanted to do this, you would need to space the rebar much more closely together than using pressure treat. I'd also worry about decomposition. Composites aren't rated for direct contact with dirt, and they can decay. I probably wouldn't do it.


2

Composite wood is not usually rated for structural uses. Whether this is structural or not is debatable, but you'd likely need to drive more rebar if you opt for composite boards to prevent buckling.


1

At that length and with a decent thickness (>=1 1/2") you'd probably be fine just using a solid wood plank as long as the species is appropriate. Here's a chart of the modulus of elasticity for some common woods http://www.woodworkweb.com/woodwork-topics/wood/146-wood-strengths.html To be honest, when designing something like a staircase you should really ...


0

I know this is way after the fact but if you want to brown up wood a cool method is to use Potasium Dichromate (Bichromate of Potash if your an old timey cabinet maker). Its a water soluble mineral that reacts with the tannin in the wood and accelerates the natural aging process. It won't eliminate the red completely but it makes it more of a brown tone and ...


2

It may make some cringe, and it is not for the faint of heart, but I would use an extension ladder of the proper height, placed on the stairs so the angle is good for climbing, one of these for either end of the long run of the stair, and place a walk board, a 2X10 or 2X12 (in the US), that is the main work surface. Access to it would be by another item ...


2

There are three ways: 1) Lean a ladder against the lower wall, put boards connecting it with an upper stair, and put a ladder on top of that. 2) Use a baker scaffold. Baker scaffolds can be set up with varying height legs. Then put a ladder on the baker scaffold. This is my recommended solution. 3) Use a 2 wheel edging paint pad that will allow you to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included