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1

The purpose of the solvent is to not remove but redistribute the stain that is already applied, although it will remove some of it. It will not remove what has penetrated into the grain of the wood, but it will lighten it. The solvent may even push it deeper into the grain, and that is ok too. You can sand your project at this point, the scratches will ...


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I know this is way after the fact but if you want to brown up wood a cool method is to use Potasium Dichromate (Bichromate of Potash if your an old timey cabinet maker). Its a water soluble mineral that reacts with the tannin in the wood and accelerates the natural aging process. It won't eliminate the red completely but it makes it more of a brown tone and ...


1

If you're feeling adventurous you could try spraying on a tinted top coat, that way you could achieve the ebony(ish) color and preserve the grain pattern. Its a tricky technique and it must be sprayed but it can be done. There are a few variations but in general you add 10-20% dye stain to a finish like urethane or lacquer and spray on enough coats to get ...


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Seeing how it isn't real wood, rather just a thin laminate on top of MDF, I wouldn't bother trying to stain it and instead would just paint it. Painting it shouldn't be any different than painting anything else really - lightly sand, prime and paint! Depending on the color and type of paint, you might need two or more coats. If you haven't yet assembled ...


1

With real wood, proper technique with stain is to apply, let it soak in, wipe off excess which wasn't absorbed (by the less porous parts of the grain pattern), let it dry completely, evaluate the result, and repeat the whole sequence if/where you aren't getting the contrast you want. Then apply varnish over the top to seal it and protect it, again letting it ...


4

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


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At a minimum, all the horizontal surfaces should be prepared. My method of choice has always been to use a pressure washer and wood cleaner. If it is particularly bad you can take a firm nylon bristled broom/scrubber and help work it in. Once the cleaner has been on for a few minutes (check the label) pressure wash the deck clean, it is the easiest and ...


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You can buy a liquid stripper that is formulated to remove old deck stain. Rent a pressure washer from the hardware store. Use a pump sprayer to spray the stripper, and use a stiff nylon brush on a pole to loosen the old stain. Pressure wash until the deck is clean. It should only take a few hours. Allow it to dry for one week before staining. DO NOT SAND ...


1

The picture shows a "semi-transparent oil-based stain" over very pretty and smooth wood. Probably expensive lumber! If the wood looks good, the semi-transparent stain will look good. Do not use any clear coats as they disintegrate under UV and you will have a nightmare on your hands.


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1 full year is usually enough time before staining treated lumber. If you are worried about it wait one more year. When the wood starts to change colors is a sure sign it is okay.


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It soundless like the previous layer of stain was not ready for re-stain. That is why the new stain is not drying. It will eventually dry (maybe a month) but you will be unable to use deck in meantime. oops. Next time try a water-test to see if stain is actually absorbing or repelling water. If water beads-up on it still you cannot stain yet.


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Semi-solid stain (Cabot's) is a great choice over untreated pine. Pressure wash and allow to dry. If you want to brighten the wood (so it is not grey) you can buy a "Wood Brightener" and apply when you pressure wash and by using a stiff nylon scrub brush on a pole. Do not sand! Allow to dry for 1 week. Apply with a 4" deck brush on a broom handle (one ...


1

Pressure wash (use bleach/Jomax -- read the directions first) and rinse. Allow to dry for one week. Don't add moisture the day before! Sweep off any debris and stain. (Usually wait 24-48 hrs after staining before light traffic). SIDENOTES: Wear vinyl/latex gloves that can be discarded. Wear old clothes. Work in shade or cooler times of day when ...


3

Yes you absolutely need to treat spruce and pine with something or they will weather and splinter ferociously. You've got two basic options 1: a protective finish such as a varnish or polyurethane or 2: a penetrative sealer like linsead oil, water sealer, etc. Both have merits and weaknesses but either properly applied will get the job done. More important ...


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I doubt this will help you now seeing as its been over a year but I would say that every product I've ever used says "apply to clean dry surface" or something to that effect, even water borne stuff. Which is to say that you'll get the best penetration and adhesion with wood that's perfectly dry. If you're using a product that has a staining effect you'll ...



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