Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Sometimes if you're staining the same color you can avoid sanding the whole thing. If you're staining though you want to be aware that some stains get darker with layers. So if you have a spot with no stain it will look different than the spot next to it. You can lighten this by "pre-staining" or sanding everything as close to bare wood as possible. ...


0

That sounds like what we call "water marking", which is an unsightly doubling of color where the brush strokes overlap. Typically it's what happens when you don't apply your subsequent passes of stain soon enough. Your best bet is to remove the strain with a cabinet scraper and resand. I've heard of wetting the whole area to be strains with mineral spirits ...


0

Old decks get slippery when from organic material and worse with wax based sealers. Then there is the cosmetic blemish of aging with black stains from slow drying areas. Stain looks great but slows down the drying out process which aggravates spots where water collects whereas as unfinished dries the quickest but turns grey from UV. Appearance will vary ...


-1

I did my living room floor last year. Pulled up the nasty carpet where I found thick white paint all over these beautiful hardwoods. I learned everything I did on you tube and I was at Home Depot almost everyday. My floor turned out AMAZING! Im now as we speak doing my bedroom, and redoing my hallway. Be careful sanding because the stain will look horrible ...


0

Well you can do one of a couple things. Stain the entire board. This may be the easiest option, just clean up the drips down the side a bit (sanding them). Then stain the sides and the back side of the board as well. Rub it on, let it sit for a couple minutes and then wipe it off. Unless of course as Keshlam mentioned you are working with a ...


2

There should be no permanent cosmetic damage unless you have something seriously wrong with your liner (in which case the damage is already done). Replacing water is very rarely the solution for algae. In practice you can just leave it until next season. Of course make sure it's winterized — i.e., if you're in a freeze zone ensure all lines, pumps, ...


0

Prep is always the most important step. Make sure the wood is dry. It shouldn't make too much of a difference that it rained after you sanded it down as long as it still has pores to absorb the stain. I always recommend placing a large tarp over the area so that if it does rain, you don't have to worry too much about your work.


2

Nope. Don't use Water Seal. The main issue is that cedar is a pretty soft wood, and it wears. No matter what you put on it, the wood beneath will wear, and it will look like a leper with a sunburn. What you want to use is an oil. @Jeremy above suggested Australian Timber Oil, which is as good a solution as any. The idea is that oils will penetrate ...



Top 50 recent answers are included