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I have used Behr Oil based stain for the first 5 years on a flight of stairs outside and 3 decks and an entry area on my home. It always dried within 4 hours. 6th year I thought I'd try another brand and two weeks later still sticky. They tried to tell me I was suppose to strip my decks every year. Whatever defective product. I purchased another gallon ...


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It looks like you neither sanded with the grain or used a fine enough sandpaper in order to prepare for staining. I think you have to go sand it down and start over. Those likely would have been visible before staining.


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Sanding The core of the sanding must be done before you finish your work; in other words, just after stripping. Most paint strippers won't do a perfect job, sanding will help you remove the leftovers. Sanding can also be used to remove any existing scratches or dents. Raising the grain (Optional) Once your piece is perfect (no visible scratches and ...


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I agree with James. Use paint stripper, and give it a thorough rinsing. The can of stripper will have the instructions on rinsing. After that, then have at it with the sanding. The reason being, the finish will sand differently than the bare wood and the bare wood will lose, dishing it out slightly before the finish is removed. The stripper will allow the ...


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In general, finish coats will not absorb any stain. The finish seals the pores of the wood preventing anything from penetrating. True stain can only be put on wood that does not have a sealer on it. Where you sanded, you removed the sealing finish coat. That let the stain penetrate and darken the wood more than the surrounding areas. The only real fix now ...


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No mineral spirits are not a good conditioner for wood. Solvents in general will dry wood out and break down any oils that are in the wood. This leads to decay of the wood. What are you conditioning it for? Do you plan to stain and seal it or are you simply trying to protect the wood?


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Well first off: that's not oak. It's larch or southern yellow pine (maybe even hemlock) from the look of it. As for color, that looks very near to the natural color of softwood after some yellowing from age but its hard to say. It appears to be production grade furniture (although of a fairly high quality) which means the colorant(stain), if any, is a ...


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Go to your local paint or big box store and get a color chart for the stains they carry. Often they show the stain on both oak and pine. As Veritas pointed out, you have pine. Pick the colors that come close (recommend three: one as close as possible, one lighter, one darker) and buy the smallest can possible (usually a half pint). Test each of these on an ...


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Your best bet is to have Sherwin-Williams do a stain match. The only thing I suggest otherwise is that when they ask you the wood type, you reply to them that you have white pine as that is what the furniture is. If I were trying to come close I would grab natural stain and satin polyurethane.


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After experimenting with a lot of different options, I found Australian Timber Oil (Natural) works the best and has the best color for cedar.


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First off, I would not recommend staining particle board. If I'm picturing it correctly, you're working with an Ikea product that's essentially compressed sawdust held together by glue and two thin sheets of veneer, right? If the veneer is real wood, then you have a shot at staining with a good result. Otherwise, stick with paint. For staining, you'll need ...


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If its what I'm thinking it is( a thermal-foiled particle board) you are doomed to failure. Most production grade furniture is made of this material and it will never take stain or finish the way you want it to. Basically they take particle board and wrap it in a micron thick layer of (usually) pvc foil with a wood grain printed on it. The foil is ...



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