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I did the same thing. I had to start over. But only in the small area that had the drip. I am redoing my kitchen cabinets, and while putting the glaze on the doors some dripped and got on the other side of the door, did not notice it until it had dried. So on the small area I repainted and then glazed. Can't even tell it happened.I was using The Rust-Oleum ...


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I have used a gurney on my decking taking away old paint comes up a treat Remember not to get to close if it is a powerful one as this could start ripping up the timber You can purchase a decent one from Bunnings for around $200 then I'm sure your use it on other areas as well


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The wood looks to be in good shape; this is fortunate. I think your best bet is to use a large drum sander from a rental place; just make sure all the nails/screws are sunk below the level of the boards. If you use small power tools, it will take a lot of time, effort, and sandpaper. If you plan to re-use the spindles and they are painted, a grinder worked ...


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Here in Norway the local 'wisdom' is to install the pressure treated timber one season and stain it the next. As a builder I agree with some of the above comments that the timber can take a considerable time to dry out. However, a few weeks of good weather should get it dry enough to take a finish, but I'd use a moisture metre and check the (finish) ...


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We have a similarly old house, and I can say, if you are patient, stripping, sanding, and refinishing can be done in place. We have done casing trim, and baseboards in place, but chose to remove the window apron to refinish that. For grooves, look into dentist picks to pull any paint. For sanding, use odd shapes of scrap with sandpaper adhered to it.


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I had this happen in 2007. I put too much stain(MinWax) on the floors and the air conditioning went out in the house so it was too moist for it to dry. I wiped it all down but found it too dark in spots. We ended up resanding and starting from scratch. I would try wiping it down and if not too dark, good. I would also turn up the air conditioning if you have ...


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If conditions are hot and dry, my experience is 24 hours is plenty. As long as it is dry to the touch you should be ok. A quick note on the stain itself. Two years ago I discovered Behr Deckover. This product is more expensive than traditional stains and goes on thick. However, after two years not a crack or blemish. Looks like it was just applied. ...


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Most oil-based deck stains need at least 24 hours of dry time. High humidity and/or low temperatures will increase that time, so will over-applying the stain. I would not apply it unless I was fairly confident that I had at least 48 hours with no rain. Better to wait.


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I waited two years. The wood naturally aged, but still took stain just fine. I stained it two more times before I had to strip it and start over.



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