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10

The key to any finishing or refinishing job is proper preparation. 1) Clean the deck, railings etc well, removing as much dirt, grime etc with a power washer on medium setting 2) Wet the area with a mixture of 2/3 gal water, 1/3 gal bleach, and 1/2 cup TSP. 3) Let the mixture set for 5 minutes, then scrub it in with a stiff bristle push broom wetted in ...


10

The finish color is dependent on two things...the stain, and the substrate (well, and some other variables as well...such as application method, length of time before you wipe it, how many coats, etc.). You can't use one stain on two substrates and expect a match anymore than you would expect finding a match with two different stains on one piece of wood. ...


9

Remove the door knob and latch mechanism. Sand the damaged area, focusing on feathering down the edge between the old finish and the now unfinished areas. Start with an 80 grit and work in steps up to 120G or even 150G depending on how much you love this door. Be careful not to get too aggressive, this looks like a veneered hollow-core door and you want to ...


9

If the pros couldn't do much, It sounds like the stain is there for good. Some suggestions: small throw rug/welcome mat. Just cover it up! bring in a pro to swap that bit of carpet with maybe something in a closet, or just a far corner. A good carpet pro should be able to seam it all back together. dye the entire carpet a shade or two darker. I know such ...


8

The other answers not withstanding, please keep in mind that a glossy finish will probably be more slippery when it is wet (maybe even when it is still dry). This may be why you are having a hard time finding a glossy deck finish. I think you will find that surfaces that are great for traction and safety (rougher, sandpaper like) will be the exact opposite ...


7

It'll be fine. You should always wait at least one year anyways to make sure the wood is fully dried. I think I waited almost 3 years before I stained parts of my deck, with no detrimental effects.


7

Painting a pressure treated wood deck is always tricky. Pressure treated wood does not seem to hold paint well, even with a good primer. Stain is usually a better alternative, but since your deck already has paint, it would have to be stripped completely before using stain. In order for the paint to stick fairly well, the surface needs to be as clean and ...


6

First, a quick note on technique - start with a coarse grade sandpaper on the floor sander and work down to the the finer grade. The coarse grade removes the old finish and levels out the imperfections, then the fine grade makes it nice and smooth. If you go the other way around, you'll definitely curse every time you see the grooves in the sunlight. ...


6

It might be better if you didn't stain the wood. We have varnished the floors in nearly all the rooms in our circa 1900 house and in each case we used clear Ronseal Diamond Hard varnish - it's quick drying and "does what it says on the tin" * - and with three coats it still darkens the wood quite nicely. It isn't necessary to stain before varnishing and ...


6

There are 2 basic categories for wood finishes; those that penetrate, and those that coat. Linseed oil, wax, "hand rubbed polish" finishes are all examples of a penetrating finish. Varnish, lacquer, shellac are examples of coating finishes. There are many different reasons to choose one over the other. Some factors: what type of wood how will the wood be ...


5

Have you been in contact with the company that did the original job? I'd certainly say it's their responsibility to fix the problem at no additional cost to you. As far as the method of fixing the problem, sanding is probably your best option. When I was figuring out how to properly stain test scraps, I made a few mistakes (see this question). Just to ...


5

I would suggest using outdoor polyurethane varnish.


5

When ever I prep a deck for restaining, I clean it with a mixture of TSP, bleach and water. I apply the mixture, scrub it with a stiff broom and rinse it well with water or a power washer. Let it dry well, then apply stain. The cleaning solution helps remove the dirt, grime, spills, etc. Pretty basic stuff, I admit. As far as why your stain doesn't want to ...


5

Regardless of the religious factor involved in painting hardwood trim, (lololol) if you must do it, you need to buff sand the wood, 150 or 220 is fine for this step. PRIME the trim with BINs Bullseye, pigmented shellac. After the Bins dries, very lightly sand it again with 220-400 paper or 4/0 steel wool. It will be smooth as glass. The shellac will seal ...


5

If the wood feels smooth to the touch and you're happy with the color then I wouldn't worry about it. Some woods absorb extra stain without a problem. If you are worried about tackiness Apply mineral spirits with steel wool or a scrubby sponge. Clean the gunk off and dry overnight. This may make the color splotchy or lighter than you intended. If so, a ...


5

The Minwax website says to apply another coat of stain on top of that and then once it softens up the dried stain just wipe it off like you normally would. I'm currently having the exact same problem. But I think this makes sense so thats what I'm going to try.


5

If the surface is edge grain and the previous finish was only wax, wiping down with mineral spirits and then sanding using progressively finer grits up to 220 or so should be pretty good preparation to refinish. Skip the soap and water treatment as it won't dissolve any wax and only complicates finishing. Before applying any finish the wood should be ...


5

You would (unfortunately) have to sand and stain the whole thing. Stain color is very dependent on a whole bunch of varied factors, and so the final color is always a bit of a guess. In your case, you could reapply stain to the areas you indicated, since they seem to be lighter in shade. Reapplying will darken the color and maybe get it "close enough". ...


5

Do what a professional would do - don't touch it when wet. Sand the affected areas with fine grit and re-stain, leave until it dries completely, then move, flip over and do the opposite side, etc. Apply the poly in the same manner. You cannot handle pieces until they dry fully. You also cannot handle them with hands that are wet with finish.


4

One option is to replace the board. You would need to: Cut out the old board. Find a board that matches the type and grain of the rest of the floor Install the new board. Stain it to match. Buy your dog a chew toy. :) UPDATE You can remove most of the old board by: Cutting it out with a circular saw. Using a hammer and chisel (or even a flathead ...


4

I would buy something close and tint it yourself. You can run sample swatches on scraps of your unfinished lumber and stop when you get it right. This will also allow you to experiment with different techniques to see which is the best match, e.g. how long to let the stain soak in before wiping it off. See ...


4

I'd give it a once-over with 180 or 220 grit. I've made the mistake of assuming surfaces were smooth enough to paint/stain and found rough spots while in the process of finishing. Nothing will make you want to kick yourself more than realizing that first coat of paint/stain you just applied needs to be sanded back off so you can properly prep the surface. ...


4

Have you considered wood dyes, not stains? You can buy dyes in a wide variety of colors/shades from woodworking specialty stores online. The dyes may seem expensive, but they are very concentrated, and because you can dilute them and mix them as you wish, you have a better chance of being able to fine tune the mix so that you get something that's close. ...


4

Quick Google search turns up Modello Gel-lo Modello Gel-lo is a thickening agent for liquid coloring mediums such as acid and water-based stains for concrete. The addition of Modello Gel-lo allows for more controlled color application and helps to reduce "wicking" of the stains under the edges of the Modello patterns. And Stain Muleā„¢. ...


4

This treatment only affects the surface of the wood. It's not going to weaken the table. That said, the effect of a vinegar/steel wood stain is going to vary a lot depending on the type of wood you're staining. It will be best to test your entire finishing process including the clear finish on the actual table. You can use the bottom or some other ...


4

I really like using a sealing primer like Bin's Bulls Eye. this is a pigmated shellac based primer that can be sanded smooth as glass. It cures very hard, blocks any stains well and is an excellent base for topcoats. For a top coat, you can use a couple of coats of good grade latex gloss or semi gloss (personal preference). If you want a really hard ...


4

The water based paint will come off eventually with rain and normal activity on the paving slabs, but it will take a while. The only guaranteed way is to use water and a scrubbing brush or, if you don't want to get down on your hands and knees, a stiff bristled yard brush.


4

Using a plug is your best option. Getting an exact match is pretty much impossible. A drill press is the tool of choice for a perfect plug if is conjunction with a good hole saw bit or plug cutting bit. If you can cut the plug from the same stained material in an out of sight location, this would save a lot of time. Color matching is tough to do. Keep in ...



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