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15

Short answer : money. Longer answer: Inquiring at Google Contracting Services and doing some back of the envelope math, I came up with the following price ranges for the mentioned insulation types. Spray foam is about $0.15-0.21/square foot/R Fibreglass batts are about $0.03-0.07/square foot/R Rigid foam panels are about $0.10-0.15/square foot/R As we ...


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It wouldn't even be cost to me. You have tons of crap running through your attic - electric, venting, whatever. Why would you want these things set in stone? What would you do if you needed to properly secure more electric after spraying. Does not make sense to me at all. I have been up in my attic 20-30 times over the past few years moving electric, ...


3

I used spray foam in my attic. Here's why: I wanted the A/C units in the attic to be in the thermal envelope of the house. Placing anything but sprayed open cell or closed cell foam on the underside of the roof deck was the only option for me. I could have used SIP panels if I was replacing the roof. To get R-value for my area (central FL) I would need ...


2

If you look on the web, you will read many horror stories regarding sprayed foam: shrinking, cracking and falling off roofs and walls. To spray, you need the right mix for the time and day, the right temperature on the base you are spraying and the right humidity - getting this right is not easy. On the other hand, sheet polystyrene is better than ...


2

I'm in a temp range about 5C more in each direction. Attached garages tend to be about half as cold as outside so a thermal break is less important here. It wouldn't be a huge loss if you just screwed the gypsum board directly to the underside of the floor joists. However, it's easy to get a thermal break without much more effort, and it's almost as easy as ...


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There is an expanding foam product made specially for injection into stud wall cavities. I don't think standard "spray foam" insulation is appropriate for injection into an enclosed cavity. Generally spray foam is applied to exposed surfaces. At any rate, in terms of the required personal protective equipment, you should be able to get a hold of a MSDS ...


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Cheap masks are for debris not chemical inhalants, you'll need a respirator. One-component Cans only require fan ventilation. *See page 15 of referenced link. If you not actually spraying it you might get by without a suit but due to some prep and finish work required, wear gloves. Dependent on the laws in your county, but most require >15% flame ...


1

A lot of spray foam companies have popped up lately, I suspect rising heating and cooling bills are driving this trend. Many seem to recommend an open cell (cheaper for them) installation on the backside of the roofing the attic (easier for them, particularly in houses with existing cellulose). As you can see at this link, open cell foam on the roof is ...


1

I am also in the Northeast and have had to tackle this type of situation a few times. There are several ways to attack it. In your case, the best solution, but unfortunately the most expensive would be to use an open cell foam kit to fill the joist bays. They are fairly easy to use and give you about an R-4 rating per inch. They are a two tank kit with a ...



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