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17

Short answer : money. Longer answer: Inquiring at Google Contracting Services and doing some back of the envelope math, I came up with the following price ranges for the mentioned insulation types. Spray foam is about $0.15-0.21/square foot/R Fibreglass batts are about $0.03-0.07/square foot/R Rigid foam panels are about $0.10-0.15/square foot/R As we ...


11

No this is not normal. Spray foam (or XPS/EPS foam) provides a specific R value per inch in absolute terms. It is not at all related to how framing lumber is measured. Rather then ask for a refund, I would ask the contractor to add more foam to meet the agreed upon thickness. Otherwise, you are trading efficiency and long-term savings for a short-term ...


5

You need to make the foam your vapor barrier, which means using closed-cell foam. Secondly, you need sufficient foam in order to prevent condensation inside the wall. Thirdly, you do not need to fill in the space, but you need to provide enough insulation to bring the total to the required minimum for insulating ceilings. Lastly, foam is nasty when it burns, ...


4

I used spray foam in my attic. Here's why: I wanted the A/C units in the attic to be in the thermal envelope of the house. Placing anything but sprayed open cell or closed cell foam on the underside of the roof deck was the only option for me. I could have used SIP panels if I was replacing the roof. To get R-value for my area (central FL) I would need ...


3

Here is the list of acceptable ignition and thermal barriers for spray foam: http://www.icc-es.org/News/Articles/AY126ThermalBarriersSPF2011-51811.pdf In a nutshell, if the space will not be used as a living or storage space, you can cover the foam with 1/4" thick or thicker plywood. If the space will eventually be used as a living or storage area, you'll ...


3

Polyurethane foam is an excellent insulator, and it needs no added vapor barrier. Depending on your climate and local building authority requirements, you will need anywhere from 4 to 7 inches of foam. The remaining airspace does not need to be filled. It will help prevent your new ceiling from getting wet from inevitable condensation. Alternately, you could ...


3

It wouldn't even be cost to me. You have tons of crap running through your attic - electric, venting, whatever. Why would you want these things set in stone? What would you do if you needed to properly secure more electric after spraying. Does not make sense to me at all. I have been up in my attic 20-30 times over the past few years moving electric, ...


3

I'm in a temp range about 5C more in each direction. Attached garages tend to be about half as cold as outside so a thermal break is less important here. It wouldn't be a huge loss if you just screwed the gypsum board directly to the underside of the floor joists. However, it's easy to get a thermal break without much more effort, and it's almost as easy as ...


2

here is how we do block wall basement finishing - in almost 30 years i have never had a callback or any complaints about leaks after the fact. you do have to make sure the foundation is in good shape with no failed blocks or footings. 1) hire a foundation waterproofing company to come in and shoot urethane foundation sealer (blueseal is what we use. like ...


2

Building Science Corporation recommends the following model these days for basement insulation: rigid foam (or spray foam) directly against wall stud wall (I prefer steel...easier to put up, no mold substrate, really lightweight) finished wall (I prefer paperless sheetrock again, to avoid having a place for mold to grow) Note the absence of any vapor ...


2

Option 2 is the best or only sound advice. Here's a class on what's been determined. You can skip the "adhering" of the foam boards & have the stud walls hold it in place without issue. If building the stud walls in place you'd just temporarily tack the wall's top plate in to hold the foam boards for you while you tape &/or spray foam seams & ...


2

If you look on the web, you will read many horror stories regarding sprayed foam: shrinking, cracking and falling off roofs and walls. To spray, you need the right mix for the time and day, the right temperature on the base you are spraying and the right humidity - getting this right is not easy. On the other hand, sheet polystyrene is better than ...


2

There is an expanding foam product made specially for injection into stud wall cavities. I don't think standard "spray foam" insulation is appropriate for injection into an enclosed cavity. Generally spray foam is applied to exposed surfaces. At any rate, in terms of the required personal protective equipment, you should be able to get a hold of a MSDS (...


2

If you are adventurous and have a lot of patience, remove the upholstery over the crack to get both sides exposed. That is the adventurous part. Next, widen ALL the cracks, even the little hairline cracks radiating from the larger ones, with a fine tooth narrow blade saw, something like a drywall saw, with finer teeth if possible. Get them all open to about ...


1

Yes, you can do this. But there's no reason to cobble it together yourself; the Huber company (no affiliation) manufactures something called Zip-R that's an all-in-one version of what you're describing, plus a weather-resistant outer face that can be taped and doesn't need an additional water-resistive barrier (like Tyvek or tar paper) over it. Other ...


1

Application of foam from the interior will not stop water from penetrating the compromised flashing seal. The water that does penetrate may very likely end up someplace you would rather not have it. That being said, it will probably be better than doing nothing, judging by your description of the leak and considering the weather that is headed your way. The ...


1

Spray foam is toxic regardless of manufacturer claims. Water-blown does not constitute safe. Read the manufacturer's SDS / Safety Data Sheet and compare them. Some tell the whole story, other's hide the truth behind 'proprietary' disclosure laws. Everything you need to know to protect your family from the hazards associated with this insulating product ...


1

Spray foam is fine here. Hire it out, don't try yourself. You won't save much if any money and this stuff is better installed by pros. Make sure the roof decking is bone-dry on the day they install it. Determine what kind of R-value you want, too. The stuff is so expensive that installers will often try to convince you that 2 to 4 inches is sufficient for a ...


1

Cheap masks are for debris not chemical inhalants, you'll need a respirator. One-component Cans only require fan ventilation. *See page 15 of referenced link. If you not actually spraying it you might get by without a suit but due to some prep and finish work required, wear gloves. Dependent on the laws in your county, but most require >15% flame ...


1

A lot of spray foam companies have popped up lately, I suspect rising heating and cooling bills are driving this trend. Many seem to recommend an open cell (cheaper for them) installation on the backside of the roofing the attic (easier for them, particularly in houses with existing cellulose). As you can see at this link, open cell foam on the roof is ...


1

I am also in the Northeast and have had to tackle this type of situation a few times. There are several ways to attack it. In your case, the best solution, but unfortunately the most expensive would be to use an open cell foam kit to fill the joist bays. They are fairly easy to use and give you about an R-4 rating per inch. They are a two tank kit with a ...



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