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14

I don't think you'll be happy with spackle for anything bigger across than a nail hole. It's not very strong, and also not very sticky. So what tends to happen in your situation is that the spackle will fall through the hole into the wall; if not when you're applying it then it will be likely to do it when you try to sand it smooth before you paint. I ...


8

I had wood paneling at an old house of mine and I ended up just painting it. You could try and skim coat it, DAP makes a product which is escaping me at the moment just for skim coating, but I'd be leary of putting it on paneling. The reason I say this is from my experience, paneling tends to flex quite a bit if put under slight pressure. I'd be afraid that ...


8

That flexing you mentioned in a comment is going to be a real problem for you. Anything you put in those grooves has to be able to flex along with the paneling, otherwise it's just going to crack and/or fall out. One of my brothers had a very similar situation and chose a rather novel solution. He removed all the paneling and reattached it with the revers ...


7

Remove high spots by hand sanding the entire wall with a flat, rigid 1/2-sheet sanding block and 80 grit paper. It's ok to remove too much, but stop wherever you start to see the sheet rock facing paper or joint tape. Ideally, 100% of the wall will have been sanded. For the areas (if any) where the paper shows before all the ridges (as in your photo) are ...


6

Actually, @Edwin gave you a good answer. I'll add a bit to it. The bubbles are usually from not mixing the mud well enough or not applying it with enough pressure. It is not unusual to see lots of small bubbles on the first coat. The second coat is going to be thinner and applied with a bit more pressure and wider knife or trowel than the first. Here's a ...


5

For something that small the spackle should be fine by itself. You might want to fill the whole with spackle first and let it dry, as some will tend to want to bubble out. Once it is dry sand it down and then put on a second (hopefully final) coat of spackle.


5

The reason for waiting is to ensure that the plaster dries completely. If you paint over damp plaster the moisture has to still come out - through the paint causing it to bubble and come away. You will end up having to repaint at the very least. If you have only patched the wall then you should be able to prime and paint it sooner as there is less area to ...


4

Get yourself a drywall sander Sand down the high spots using rough grit (100 grit) sand paper (they sell it to fit the sander - you'll find the sander in the drywall area and the sandpaper in paints) then smooth it with 200 grit. If you have low points, fill them in after sanding. Next time use less mud (little applications, not big ones) and then use a ...


4

There have got to be many ways to minimize the bubbles. These kind of problems you deal with when finishing drywall require a certain amount of skill that, for me, comes only with experience. That said, I have a few ideas: Add a little bit of water. The further along in the finishing process, the thinner the compound should be. Mix well, even if you add ...


4

Wet Sanding If you want a smooth surface, you could try wet sanding it. Purchase a drywall sanding sponge (~$4.00 at any home improvement store), and use that for the final sanding pass. Fill a bucket with water. Dunk the sponge in the water, and then wring it out to remove as much excess water as possible. Using a light circular motion, buff the ...


3

It is hard to tell from the picture but I am guessing you are using a traditional screen and you are moving the screen back and forth along one of the axes of the screen. If the less than stellar ascii art below is your screen, instead of instead of moving N-S or E-W move the screen NE-SW or NW-SE. Or start with the screen rotated 45 degrees and continue to ...


2

(I am assuming the “spackle” is US for filler.) Have a firm base for filler does help, as you need to be able to push on the filler to get it well into the side of the holes. However as it is not the end of the world if the filler breaks when you try to send it, I would try the easy option first. For larger holes I have built up with layers of filler ...


2

Firstly, @Michael Karas answer addresses the "sagging" Cracking: Premixed Joint Compound (JC) hardens by drying out. As such, it tends to shrink. I only use it for final top coats, where the shrinkage is mitigated and application layers are about 1/8 or so. Setting JC is dry and mixed with water to a similar consistency as Premixed JC, but it hardens ...


1

You are getting these because the compound going on is too thick. My drywall guys start with a small bucket of powder and water and mix to the consistency of pancake syrup and then add the premixed stuff in. Basically to the point where it barely doesn't drive you nuts. It will make a mess no doubt because you will have drop everywhere. But this allows ...


1

Spackle on it's own will work just fine for small holes. For larger holes shoving paper into the hole frequently results in lots of paper inside the wall cavity before you get it sitting just right for patching. At least that's how it goes for me. For holes that might be too gig for just spackle, yet a bit small for drywall tape, one trick I've not seen ...


1

I have used a wadded up piece of newspaper pushed into a hole this size. It provided a backer for the spackle or joint compound. As mentioned by the other posters, you need several coats then sand it smooth.


1

For a hole the size of a coax cable, I would just spackle. Any larger and I would use drywall compound. It make take a couple of coats. If its up to the size of a nickle (3/4 of an inch), I would put a piece of fiberglass tape over it like Mike suggests. If its larger than that, I would cut a small piece of drywall and tap it into the whole. Here's two ...


1

I did two bedrooms successfully. I used drywall mud to fill in the grooves I used a special heavy white wallpaper (from Home Depot) to cover the paneling Note: I left the bottom half of the room's paneling exposed and used a chair rail although you do not need to do that I used drywall tape to cover the paper seams and mudded over the tape The wall looks ...


1

My mom had this issue in her basement and she ended up finding a wallpaper specifically for this purpose. It goes right on top of the paneling and bridges all of the gaps. It can then be painted over and looks very similar to a drywalled surface. The wallpaper is thicker than your average off the shelf paper- it's got a similar feel and thickness to ...


1

I just finished filling in most of a room of wood paneling by using Elmer's wood putty (comes in tubs of various sizes). It has almost no shrinkage when it dries and goes on easy. You fill the grooves, let it dry (an hour or two) and then sand it with sandpaper so it's smooth. The end result is a very smooth surface that when painted looks like a solid ...


1

Paneling will expand and contract and tend to crack filler in the joints between sheets. Might be better to just paint it with the grooves. I agree that this doesn't look as well as smooth drywall. Drywall is not all that expensive.



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