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The answer suggesting using a spray foam to fill the cavities in a hollow core door is totally wrong. Hollow core doors have a "honeycomb" card board baffle inside designed to keep the door faces from warping. The spaces created inside are probably 15 square inches or so. Once the foam filled the baffled off space, you wouldn't be able to put in any more. ...


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First, figure out how the majority of noise is getting into the interior. Is it really coming through the windows? Or is it coming through the roof and ceiling and walls? Windows are the hardest to sound deaden, but you imply you are good with acoustic foam on the windows?! What about bricking (in a removable way) over the window? An existing space can ...


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Reducing the road noise when you're in the garden is more or less impossible in this situation. Chalk it up to poor urban planning that this is even a problem to begin with. Huh, maybe "planning" is part of the problem… Anyway, there's at least hope for blocking the sound for people inside the house. Adding more insulation is virtually guaranteed to help, ...


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Yeah a solid wall will be best, but for what it's worth, if you are considering plants, go hedges. Besides hedges, generally, look for evergreens so that the sound will be blocked in winter, too. I think bamboo is also good, but it usually requires a lot of maintenance because it likes to spread. Also a water fountain (maybe for a koi pond) can help drown ...


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Foliage won't do much unless it's very dense and a fairly wide strip--say 50 feet thick or more. Instead, you'll need to look to solid-panel fencing to block and deflect sound energy. The problem is likely that there are other homes nearby, which will reflect sound from several directions. You may not be able to accomplish significant noise abatement with ...


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Have you considered mounting sheetrock on the ceiling using resilient channel? Perhaps in addition to whatever insulation you put in the ceiling. The resilient channel will hold the sheetrock off of the joists. Since the sheetrock doesn't touch the wood, sound doesn't transmit directly from the framing to the sheetrock. Be sure to talk to somebody and/or ...


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Typically you want the basement insulation installed with the paper (vapor barrier) facing the heated part of the home. Moisture from inside air can condense and become trapped in the insulation during cold winter months leading to mold, especially at rim joists or skirts (paper facing outside). However, if you will be spending a little more time in the ...


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It doesn't matter to piping. As a rule, piping likes insulation. Although for cold piping, condensation may be an issue; insulation can hold that water and cause mold and mildew. It's an issue with electrical, because some types of wire need to be able to cool, and they can't do that covered in insulation, and this has caused house fires. I am hoping ...



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