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22

Unfortunately, since you do not own the space and cannot make deep changes to it, your options are limited. The general idea is to "decouple" the sound generation equipment from any rigid structural members, and to then isolate the air space that you are vibrating from any neighboring air spaces, so that the vibrations induced by the moving air into rigid ...


14

I wouldn't tear the bathroom wall apart... I'd tear the bedroom wall apart. What you are experiencing is the noise traveling through mechanical connections to the wall (screwed to studs) and the noise from the water passing through thin copper pipe (probably the Type M pipe rather than the thicker Type L). The only effective way I know of is to insulate ...


11

Make sure you have carpeting, or even area rugs. Get some furniture in the place. Then move up the walls with various artwork, preferably some kind of cloth or canvas. You'd be amazed at how much a hanging tapestry absorbs sound. The emptier the home, the more you'll hear echoes. Edit: I almost forgot, hang some curtains.


11

There's two principles to soundproofing that actually work: Isolation and Absorption. The trick is figuring out the right way to implement them. Be careful of anything that doesn't follow these two principles. The Absorption principle is how acoustic ceiling tiles and carpets work: They absorb the sounds as they pass through the material, or they keep the ...


10

Easier than sound-proofing a room would be to build a sound-proof box for the server using the triangular foam. Since it's a rack-mount server, just building some ducts for the front and the back and lining the ducts with the triangular foam you linked to above may be enough. An even better alternative might be to replace the system fans with low noise ...


9

Step 1: Prevent air transmission between the rooms. Sweeps for the door or a heavier door; look at the heating registers and windows; things like that. You're saying the sound is muffled, which implies the high frequencies aren't making it in, so I don't think this is the major problem. Step 2: Damp the transmitted vibration. Put big heavy bookcases on the ...


8

You might look into ceiling fans with DC motors. While I have not seen a manufacturer talk about quietness, some reviews I've read talk about quietness. The biggest attraction to DC motors is the efficiency of the motors, getting more air movement with less power. My suggestion would be find a local fan / light showroom that has some of these on display ...


7

Hollow core doors are actually not totally hollow, they typically have cardboard glued inside which just serves to stop the panels from warping. Sound moves through both air and structure. Your main concern should be air - are the doors totally sealed, especially the gap at the bottom? The door should shut tight, and ideally be air-tight. You ...


6

You might want to drill a test hole in the wall to see if it's insulated, if not some blown in cellulose or expandable foam insulation should help. It's a bit of labor but a cheaper solution than tearing down drywall. If you eventually want to go with the full monty and tear down the drywall there is a product called QuietRock, it's similar to drywall and ...


6

That's your wet wall...all the plumbing is in there connected to the wall and floor (at least in the case of the tub). Ideally, you'd take down the sheetrock in the bedroom, then install a new row of studs that are not connected to the existing wall. While you are in there, see if you can better isolate the plumbing from the studs using rubber washers and ...


5

You're looking for a Door Shoe A Door Sweep Or a Threshold with a vinyl seal Or a combination of these. These products are typically used to weather seal an exterior door from the elements, but should work just as well in your situation. They should all be available at your local home improvement store.


5

For insulating against sound between floors in our condo builds, we use the following from top down: Carpeting where possible Homasote on top of the subfloor Fiberglass insulation in the ceiling Resiliant channel to hold the drywall ceiling off of the joists (also known as sound attenuation channel) Standard drywall ceiling, installed with 1" tight ...


5

Check out Holmes on Homes, Mike Holmes did an episode in season 5 called Wall of Sound, which tackled this issue. Comment converted to answer.


5

If the sound is reaching the other side of the office, it may be traveling along the ceiling. If there's another floor above the office, you probably don't have anything -- like insulation -- blocking sound waves from traveling along the joists and/or the spaces between them. Something to consider for blocking sound coming through the walls or ceilings ...


5

If sound proofing is your primary concern then you should build the walls all the way up to the roof, past the suspended ceiling. You should insulate the walls with sound-dampening insulation. If you are willing to spend more money and time, you should look into isolating channels that the drywall attaches to. This prevents sound from being carried through ...


4

[I am not an acoustic engineer] There's no magic to sound-proofing - you need some "acoustically dense" material between you and sound (absorption), and some way to kill the vibration in the room (dampening). Most of the ideas above are pretty reasonably for DIY. You could build a home studio of acoustic tiles, but it will look funny and cost a lot. ...


4

Think about what you are hoping for. A 10dB reduction means reducing the sound power by a factor of 10. Dropping the sound power by 60dB therefore means reducing it by a factor of 1 million, or stopping 99.9999% To put this in context, this is equivalent to building a wall that blocks 100% of the sound, (let's say the wall is 9' tall by 10' wide), and then ...


4

You are not going to get a significant amount of soundproofing without losing at least some space on your side. From what you have described, it sounds like there is an exposed brick wall. Adding some 1x2 or 2x2 framing and a layer of drywall will dramatically decrease the sound transfer. In addition, adding insulation in the cavity will cut the noise ...


4

You can get acoustic plasterboard (UK site). It won't block out all the sound (as pointed out on the site) but will reduce it - hopefully to a more tolerable level. Stick this to the wall and then skim/tile on top. You will lose a bit of space from your room, but it's only one wall (the party wall).


4

Both for your own enjoyment and to help your neighbor sleep, the easiest solution would be to install some acoustical panels on the wall. Beyond that, you're looking at installing resilient channels between the drywall and studs and that's a major project.


4

Before refinishing the floor, you might want to consider using something to isolate the subwoofer from direct contact with the floor. You could try a vibration isolation riser for starters. They're a bit pricey at $50, but it's probably worth trying out before you tear out your existing floor.


4

If you have single pane glass, which transmits a lot of sound, and heavy curtains (as suggested by BMitch) don't do enough, you could try making a panel from 2" sheathing foam (it comes in 2"x2'x8' pieces for about $17/piece; it may be pink or blue depending on brand). Cut it to fill the inside of the window frame (you can use a sharp utility knife and a ...


4

Most electronic noise is made by the AC cyclic voltage, which is audible whenever that wave is transferred into something that can vibrate. That noise generally becomes more prominent (changing from a hum to a buzz) when there is something that changes the waveform to produce sharp "corners" (a "square wave"). A particularly noisy combination is a TRIAC wall ...


4

Have a look at my answer on this question regarding acoustic foam. You will be able to cut down sound propagation significantly using it, by coating the walls and ceilings of your rooms with the foam. If you have the capability, you could make a significant difference by mounting the rooms on rubber bushings. This may be overkill for your purposes, but it ...


4

I'd go with either a layer of cork or polyiso rigid foam. Then a floating floor on top. A nearby residential tower actually requires the cork underlay. The rigid foam will work just as well at lower cost. The float floor can be two layers of ply staggered and screwed to each other, or a engineered hardwood product. See also the "Sound Isolation Store" ...


4

As per the comments, no, it's not a good idea. The box / soundproofing should have been installed before drywalling. If you want to do it right, cut a piece of the drywall out to give you room to work and install it properly, then close up the wall again.


3

Start by sealing any cracks with weatherstripping. Then I'd suggest investing in some heavy curtains. You can also try hanging acoustical panels on the wall (either build them yourself, or find somewhere that supplies home theater systems).


3

For starters, find out if it's really a problem. If it's a properly built party wall, maybe it's sufficiently soundproofed as-is. If it's not, then you pretty much need to either gut it down to studs, or build a second wall on your side that is acoustically isolated from the shared wall. A typical option in a new-build is to alternate studs on each side so ...


3

If the pipe is exposed, you can enclose it with a small wall (several 2x4's for the framing and a little drywall). Make sure at any cleanout openings, you include an access panel in the wall. Then, before you install the drywall, put a bunch of insulation in there, surrounding the pipe. Avoid having anything solid connecting the pipe to the wall since ...



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